As part of its 8-K filing to the SEC, Equifax has unveiled the full extent of their massive 2017 146 million user data breach. With the huge amount of people affected, almost half of all Americans, and the massive media exposure, hopefully most victims have been proactive in monitoring their credit to make sure no funny business is going on.

This new report, though, is really eye opening as it shows exactly what information was exposed and for how many people. We are talking about addresses, dates of birth, social security numbers, genders, phone numbers, drivers license numbers, credit card numbers, tax ID, and the state of your drivers license.

Data Element Stolen

Standardized Columns Analyzed

Approximate
Number of
Impacted U.S.
Consumers
Name First Name, Last Name, Middle Name, Suffix, Full Name 146.6 million
Date of Birth D.O.B. 146.6 million
Social Security Number2 SSN 145.5 million
Address Information Address, Address2, City, State, Zip 99 million
Gender Gender 27.3 million
Phone Number Phone, Phone2 20.3 million
Driver’s License Number3 DL# 17.6 million
Email Address (w/o credentials) Email Address 1.8 million

Payment Card Number and Expiration Date

CC Number, Exp Date 209,000
TaxID TaxID 97,500
Driver’s License State DL License State 27,000
Source: Equifax Form 8-K Exhibit

The fact that any company stores such a huge amount of information about an individual, when that individual never worked directly with them, is down right scary to me.  

For anyone who was affected and did not do anything, you should really add a credit freeze to prevent new credit from being taken out using your information. If you take out new lines of credit often, then at a bare minimum you should add a fraud alert so that the creditors call you first before opening new accounts.

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