President Donald Trump

Hacker magazine 2600 said today it would pay $10,000, possibly more, to anyone who provides it with Trump's tax returns. The magazine ran a similar pledge last year before the presidential election but without any success.

2600, which is a web-based hacking magazine in the same category as the more infamous Phrack, accused Trump of acting akin to a dictator and refusing to reveal his tax returns, something that all US presidents did before him. There is no law forcing President Trump to release his tax returns.

2600 does not want people to hack the IRS

After to failing to get Trump's tax returns last year, the magazine reinstated its pledge once more and will keep it running for as long Trump is in office or until someone leaks Trump's financial documents.

The magazine made it clear it does not want people hacking the IRS for Trump's sake. Instead, they're trying to appeal to state workers with access to these documents.

Let us be clear on what we DON'T want. This is not an appeal for people to hack the IRS and attempt to liberate these documents in that manner. First off, we strongly doubt they have this information on any site accessible from the outside world. Second, we don't want people getting themselves into trouble over this. We believe there are enough people out there who already have legitimate access to this information who will see its disclosure as the right thing to do.

Bounty could go up

Shortly after going live with their pledge, 2600 announced on Twitter that the bounty had gone up to $11,000 after other people expressed interest in supplementing the initial sum.

The magazine also hinted that the bounty could grow as more individuals would want to contribute. In the worst case scenario, the bounty would be $10,000 at a minimum.

Others have offered much larger bounties in the past

Last year, an anonymous Republican donor offered $5 million just to see Trump's tax returns. A few months later, LinkedIn founder Reid Hoffman pledged the same sum from his own money, also to see Trump's tax returns.

During the presidential campaign, Democrat candidate Hillary Clinton said Trump was intentionally hiding his taxes to exaggerate his wealth and the people he does business with.

Last month, someone leaked a document said to be Trump's 2005 tax return, which showed he made $150 million, paid $38 million in taxes, and wrote off more than $100 million in business losses to reduce other taxes. The White House later confirmed the numbers, but not the document's authenticity.

2600 said it was interested in Trump's tax returns, but only for 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, or 2015. Earlier tax returns are not the subject of its bounty.

"We believe any of these will paint a somewhat accurate picture of the President's recent financial filings," said a 2600 spokesperson.

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