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Slang And Their Meanings.


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#1 DSTM

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Posted 07 July 2007 - 03:56 AM

Thought this may be an interesting Thread as one often hears slang, and not sure exactly what some Slang words mean.
Please keep it Family Friendly.Here are a few to start the ball rolling. :thumbsup:

A Gas
A lot of fun.

All show and no go.
Referenced to a car that had all the pretty chrome goodies, but wouldn't get out of its own way.

Ape
Used with "Go", "Gone" or "Went". To explode or go completely irate. Example: "When my parents saw my report card, they went ape.

Bad
Awesome.

Badass
A tough guy. A guy you really don't want to mess with.

Bag
To Steal. Example: Who bagged my towel? ; also see Score
Also; "What's your bag" meaning what's your problem or where are you coming from.

Ball
To party, as in Little Richards "Good Golly Miss Molly, Sho Like To Ball".

Bean Wagon
A Lowered all the way around, usually Hispanic owned Chevy, but could be anything.

Beat Feet
Leave the scene in a hurry.

Bench Racing
When a few of guys are sitting down (on a bench, maybe) talking about how fast a certain person's car is, or discussing who could beat who in a drag race.

Birth Control Seats
Bucket Seats

bleepin(See also Twitchin')
Good, Exciting, Awesome.

Blast
A Great Time. Example: "We had a blast at the Prom".

Blew the doors off
Easily beat the other car in a race.

Blitzed
Drunk

Blown
A car engine that has a blower (supercharger) installed. Goes between the intake manifold and the carburetors/injectors. The blower made it go faster, which was always good.

Blue Flamer
Take a B.A. ( also in the slang section ) and add a big..... then ignite it with a match..

Bogart
To "hog" something.

Bone Yard
Auto wrecking yard; Junk yard.

Boogie
really get with it.

Book
Leave the area.

Bookin'
Going real fast, usually in a car.

Boss
A great or cool thing. Example: "The Beach Boys new record is really boss".

Bread
Money

Brew (Brewski)
Beer

Brody
Also, Brody Out; To skid in a half circle with the brakes locked up.

Buddha Head
Someone of Asian descent. (Pre-Political Correctness)

Bug out
Leave the premises

Bummed out
Depressed

Bummer, What a
How depressing

Burn Rubber
To accelerate hard spinning the tires, making noise, and billows of smoke come from the rear of the vehicle.

Cat
A guy.

Cherry
Pristine, Totally Clean. Example: "That rod is cherry"!

Chick
A girl or a woman.

Chicken, To play
Two cars race toward each other; the first to pull to the side is the chicken (coward)

Chinese Fire Drill
Stop at a Red Light. Everyone on the Driver's side would run around and get in on the Passenger's side. Everyone on the Passenger's side would run around and get in on the Driver's side.

Choice
Really cool or bleepin. Example: "That girl with the tight sweater is really choice."

Chop.
To cut down verbally.
Example: "Man, you're so ugly, you gotta slip up on a glass to get a drink of water." (Now that was a "chop".)

Chopped
A section is cut out horizontally through the roof pillars of a car to lower the roof.

Chrome Dome
A bald guy.

Like to hear from Members from other Countries with some of their everyday Slang, and what the words mean. :flowers:

Edited by DSTM, 07 July 2007 - 11:30 AM.















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#2 dfence

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Posted 07 July 2007 - 05:32 AM

hey DSTM, what about we give them the "Code Book" to Aussie speak hmmmm ? lol

http://www.dunway.com/html/aussie_slang.html

There may be one or two words / definitions there that could be a little on the adult side, no offence intended to anyone
I'm not as think as you drunk I am

#3 DSTM

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Posted 07 July 2007 - 05:42 AM

hey DSTM, what about we give them the "Code Book" to Aussie speak hmmmm ? lol

http://www.dunway.com/html/aussie_slang.html

There may be one or two words / definitions there that could be a little on the adult side, no offence intended to anyone

Excellent. 'dfence' I have been searching for a good sight on Aussie Slang and couldn't find a good one.
Anybody who knows all these is a true Aussie. :thumbsup:















#4 MaraM

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Posted 07 July 2007 - 11:16 PM

Good ones!

And I'm keeping this a family friendly thread so please just smile when I share that the first time my cousin came to visit from England, when going to bed he literally said, "Ill knock you up in the morning". Eep! (Expression means to wake one in the morning rather than having to depend on an alarm clock).

And I literally snorted coffee through my nose when another relative from Britian announced that she thought me the homliest person she'd ever met. (Turns out over there that means making one's home welcome to others, etc - while here it means UGHLY! :thumbsup: ).
Never let your computer realize you are in a hurry or just typing the last few words of a vital document.

While outer events might make one happy or sad, happiness itself is entirely internal, and at all times completely within one's power.

#5 BlackSpyder

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Posted 08 July 2007 - 12:01 AM

Some ones your only to find here in the South:

Bubba: generic name for a male (usually a big one)

Darlin' or Sugar Britches: Female

Hoss: Big male (From the saying "Built like a Horse")

Pig Sticker: Large Fixed Blade hunting knife (over 6" blade)

Dykes (always plural): Diagonal Cutting Pliars

Welder (derogatory): Bad electrian

Plex: Plexiglas

to "Give Birth" (mechanical part): when a mechanical part destroys itself (ie: when a brake drum explodes)

Corking: Caulk

Techie: Any IT department personnel

"useless as nipples on a boar hog": Completely useless

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#6 MaraM

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Posted 08 July 2007 - 12:42 AM

:thumbsup: . And who would think we were all speaking the English language?! :flowers:
Never let your computer realize you are in a hurry or just typing the last few words of a vital document.

While outer events might make one happy or sad, happiness itself is entirely internal, and at all times completely within one's power.

#7 DSTM

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Posted 08 July 2007 - 01:34 AM

Here are a few more of our Aussie ones which are common. I think these brighten the dull English
Language,'MaraM' :thumbsup:

I have removed some, and left some words with the first initial. :trumpet:

Dag : a funny person, nerd, goof

Damper : bread made from flour and water

Date : ("get off your fat date")

Dead dingo's donger, as dry as a : dry

Dero : tramp, hobo, homeless person (from "derelict")

Dickhead : see "whacker"

Dingo's breakfast : a yawn, a leak and a good look round (i.e. no breakfast) :flowers:

Dinkum, fair dinkum : true, real, genuine ("I'm a dinkum Aussie"; "is he fair dinkum?")

Dinky-di : the real thing, genuine

Divvy van : Police vehicle used for transporting criminals. Named after the protective 'division' between the driver and the villains.

Dog's b.....s, stands out like : obvious

Dog's eye : meat pie

Dole bludger : somebody on social assistance when unjustified

Drink with the flies : to drink alone

Drongo : a dope, stupid person

Dropkick : see 'dipstick'

Drum : information, tip-off ("I'll give you the drum")

Duffer, cattle : rustler

Dyke,outside toilet.

Dunny : outside lavatory

Dunny budgie : blowfly :inlove:

Dunny rat, cunning as a : very cunning

'BlackSpyder' We say as useless as the T's (nipples) on a Bull. LOL instead of Boar.

Edited by DSTM, 08 July 2007 - 01:39 AM.















#8 dfence

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Posted 08 July 2007 - 02:25 AM

oh i'm sorry but i'm still laughing at BlackSpyder and dyke, :thumbsup: . it's a family show so i won't say why LOL !
I'm not as think as you drunk I am

#9 BlackSpyder

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Posted 08 July 2007 - 04:44 PM

I think that one of those words that have so many uses.

A few more:

bear or smokey bear: Police officer

zipper : Dotted white lines on the interstate

'gator: a tire cap that has come off on the highway

Wet Kit: Hydraulic setup for a tractor Trailer

Edited by BlackSpyder, 08 July 2007 - 04:58 PM.

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#10 MaraM

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Posted 09 July 2007 - 12:43 AM

Wow, one would darn near need a guide book to under :thumbsup: standing local English!

Here's a few 'Canadian' ones ...

A Canadian Could be referring to Molson Canadian beer

Anglo A non-French Canadian

A shot One ounce of liquor

Brain Drain Exodus of Canadian professionals seeking employment in the USA

Eh? What did you say?

Ex Short for Molson Export beer

Forty ouncer 40 ounce bottle of liquor

Francophone A French Canadian

Gradge Garage

Johnny on the Spot Portable toilet used at outdoor festivals and outdoor events

The Can Bathroom, toilet, lavatory

The John Bathroom, toilet, lavatory

Pogey Government assistance

Pop Soda

Polluted Very drunk

Poutine Fries with gravy and cheese curds

Zed The letter after Y

Ant Aunt
Never let your computer realize you are in a hurry or just typing the last few words of a vital document.

While outer events might make one happy or sad, happiness itself is entirely internal, and at all times completely within one's power.

#11 rowal5555

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Posted 09 July 2007 - 02:07 AM

Here is a link to typical KIWI slang. There are 100s of items and I'm too lazy to type them all, so browse if you wish. A handful are more for adults, so be warned.

http://www.chemistry.co.nz/kiwi.htm

Cheers

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#12 DSTM

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Posted 09 July 2007 - 02:16 AM

What happened to the Queens English? :thumbsup:

Face, off one's : drunk ("He was off his face by 9pm")

Fair suck of the sav! : exclamation of wonder, awe, disbelief (see also "sav")

Feral : V8 ute (q.v.) sporting large heavy bullbar, numerous aerials, large truck mudflaps and stickers almost all over the rear window and tailgate. Sometimes seen with a Mack emblem on the bonnet and always with large (multiple) driving lights

Feral (n.) : a hippie

Figjam : Nickname for people who have a high opinion of themselves.

Flat out like a lizard drinking : flat out, busy

Flick : to give something or somebody the flick is to get rid of it or him/her

Flick it on : to sell something, usually for a quick profit, soon after buying it.


Fossick : search, rummage ("fossicking through the kitchen drawers")

Franger : condom

Freckle : anus

Fremantle Doctor : the cooling afternoon breeze that arrives in Perth from the direction of Freeo

Frog in a sock, as cross as a : sounding angry - a person or your hard drive!

Fruit loop : fool

Furphy : false or unreliable rumour

The lights are on and no one's home.: Thick as a Brick.

Kangaroos loose in the top paddock : Intellectually inadequate

Edited by DSTM, 09 July 2007 - 03:14 AM.















#13 rowal5555

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Posted 09 July 2007 - 04:25 AM

And a few more -

ads: TV commercials, adverts, these days you can boil the jug while the ads are on

afternoon tea: short break (10-15mins) from work in afternoon

a into g: get going, ar*e into gear, as in 'I've got to get my a into g'

anklebiter: small child

Aotearoa: Maori name for New Zealand, it means the land of the long white cloud

banger: sausage, often in bangers and mash, which is sausages with mashed potato

bach: holiday home, pronounced batch

beaut, beauty: splendid, terrific, as in 'Beaut car, where'd you get it?'

bit of a dag: hard case, comedian

biscuit: cookie, recipes for Afghans and Anzacs

bite your bum: go away, get lost

bloke: man, usually a stranger, as in 'that bloke down the road'

bludge: to sponge off other people or the government, as in 'dole bludger'

bonnet: car hood

boohai: out of the way, remote or non existent place, often in 'up the boohai' to mean lost, or 'up the boohai shooting pukakas' meaning lost, possibly in the head.

boot: car trunk

boy-racer: young man who drives fast in a car with a loud stereo

brassed off: disappointed, annoyed

bum: rear end, butt

bush: a large dense area of small and large native trees and plants, forest

cardy, cardie: woolen jersey that buttons up the front

carked it: died

cheers: goodbye, thanks or good luck

chemist: pharmacy, drugstore

cheerio: goodbye, also a name for a cocktail sausage

chilly bin: polystyrene insulated box for keeping food and drinks cold, cooler, esky

chocka: choc-a-block, full, overflowing

chocolate fish: chocolate covered marshmallow fish, frequently given or offered as a reward.

chips: fried potato slices, but much thicker than a McDonalds french fry

chippie: potato chip

chunder: vomit

cocky: farmer, most commonly cow-cocky

college: high school, not university

cow: unpleasant, mean, ill-tempered person or uncooperative thing, as in 'a cow of a lawnmower'

cracker: very good

crash hot: excellent

crayfish: lobster-like edible saltwater crustacean

creek: small freshwater stream, the sort of place to fish for eels

crib: Southland equivalent of bach

crikey dick: expression of surprise

crook: sick, poorly, also to go crook at, meaning to be angry with, or to put someone crook , meaning to give someone bad advice

cuppa: cuppa tea, cuppa milo

cuz: cousin

dag: humorous person, joker, comedian, hard case

dairy: corner store, the only shop allowed to open 365 days a year, selling milk, bread, newspapers, groceries, etc on a small scale.

dear: expensive, as in 'gosh, thats dear'

dole: unemployment benefit

dodgy: bad, unreliable

doodackie: variant of thingummybob or doodad, for an object that you can't think of a name for

dreaded lurgy: cold or flu

dressing gown: bathrobe

drop in it: get someone in trouble, as in 'you really dropped me in it with the wife'

drop your gear: get undressed

dunny: toilet, bathroom, lavatory

duvet: quilt, doona

dux: academically top student in final year of high school



eh: pronounced 'ay', often used to turn a statement into a question, 'That was a good movie, eh?', often used instead of what? or pardon?

Eketahuna: the archetypal small country city lacking amenities and which no one is expected to know anything about, similar to "timbuktu". This town does exist.



fair go: appeal for fairness or reasonableness

fancy: to like someone, as in 'he fancies her'

fart sack: bed

fitter and turner: a cook who fits food into pots and turns it into rubbish

fizzy drink: soda pop

flat stick or flat tack: full speed, as fast as possible, as in 'he was going flat stick when I saw him'

full tit: as much power as possible, or very fast, as in 'I gave her full tit and we were still only doing 70'



g'day: universal kiwi greeting, also spelled gidday

get off the grass: disbelief, similar to 'stop pulling my leg'

gimme: give me ..

gizza: give us a ..

going bush: get away from it all, take a break, become reclusive

good on ya, mate!: congratulations, well done

good as gold: good job, well done, not a problem, yes

greasies: fish and chips

ground floor: first floor

gumboots, gummies: rubber boots, wellingtons

guts for garters: in big trouble, as in 'I'll have your guts for garters!'

hangi: traditional Maori earth oven

hard case: joker, comedian, witty person

hard yakka: hard work

heaps: a lot, as in 'heaps of work to do' or 'give it heaps'

home and hosed: safe, completed successfully

hoodackie: what you call someone when you cant think of their name, similar to doodackie, thingummy etc

hoon: young adult with a fast car and loud stereo

hooray: goodbye

hosing down: raining heavily

hottie: hot water bottle

how much would you charge to haunt a ten room house?: rhetorical question to suggest a person is ugly

how's it going mate?: quintessential kiwi greeting

ice block: Popsicle

jack up: to organise, as in 'I'll see if I can jack something up', or 'it's a jackup', a false accusation, being set up

jandal: thongs, flip-flops

jersey: sweater

jumper: also sweater

kai: food, from the Maori word for eating

Kiwi: New Zealander

kiwi: a flightless native bird, endangered

kiwifruit: Zespri, formerly known as a chinese gooseberry

kick the bucket: die

knackered: stuffed, exhausted

ladies a plate: please bring a dish of food to share

laughing gear: mouth, as in wrap your laughing gear around this said by Barry Crump in a 1987 TV ad

L&P: fizzy soda water, Lemon & Paeroa (L&P); originally lemon flavoured spring water from the town of Paeroa, but this is no longer the case.

long drop: outdoor toilet built over hole in ground

Maori: indigenous people of New Zealand

mate: buddy, can be used even with strangers, as in 'how's it going mate?'

metal road: a road with a gravel surface, usually a country road

morning tea: short break (10-15mins) from work in the morning


nana: grandmother

nappy: diaper

nick away: to leave, usually quickly and surreptitiously, as in 'I'm going to nick away before the speeches, ok?'

OE: Overseas Experience, the young Kiwi's mandatory working holiday abroad.

pack a sad: become morose, ill-humoured, broken or dead, as in 'the washing machine packed a sad'

pakeha: non-Maori person

pav: pavlova, a national dessert topped with kiwifruit. The recipe.

pikelet: small pancake often served with jam and whipped cream

piker: slacker, a person who gives up when things get difficult

prang: minor car accident, as in 'he was in a prang yesterday'

puckeroo: something that is buggered or broken

pucker up: give us a kiss


pudding: dessert

quite nice: something you say when you want to be polite but can't really think of anything to say, as in 'his tie is quite nice'

rattle your dags: get a move on, hurry up

rough as guts: unpolished

sammy short of a picnic: brick short of a load, a bit thick or crazy

savs and pavs: saveloys and pavlova, traditional kiwi party food

scull: drink beer quickly

she'll be right: common attitude, meaning everything will be OK, it's not a problem

shark and taties: fish and chips

sickie: to take a day off, apparently sick

smoko: break, rest period

snarky: sarcastic and nasty

sook: silly or a scaredy cat, as in 'just a big sook'

sparkie: electrician

strapped for cash: low on funds

stuffed: tired, exhausted

sunnies: sunglasses

suss: figure out, as in 'I've got it sussed'

ta: thanks

tata: goodbye

take-aways: food purchase to be taken away and eaten, 'take-outs' or 'to go'

take the piss: to ridicule

take a hike: go away

tea: dinner, evening meal

tiki tour: scenic tour, roundabout way

tin-ar*e, tinbum: lucky person

tinny: lucky

tramping: to walk through bush, hiking

togs: swimsuit, bathing suit

ute: utility vehicle, small pickup truck

vegemite: yeast based spread for toast or bread. Seems to be a taste acquired from childhood, but missed by many ex-pats

Waikikamukau: Mythical town that is so remote it makes Eketahuna look like a metropolis. The essence of hickdom. (pronounced "Why kick a moo cow").

were you born in a tent?: sarcastic question asked of somebody who has left a door open and let draughts in

wharfie: stevedore

what's that got to do with the price of fish?: challenging the relevance of some remark

whinge: complain

wobbly: tantrum, as in 'he threw a wobbly when he heard that'

wop-wops: out of the way location, backblocks

wouldn't know sh*t from clay: naive or stupid person

wouldn't know them from a bar of soap: I do not know this person, similar to I wouldn't know them from Adam.

yonks: a long time, ages, as in 'haven't seen him in yonks'

yack: conversation between friends, natter

you ain't wrong: you're right

you get that: resigned acceptance, as in 'well with her sort, you get that'

you make a better door than a window: said to somebody standing in the way, perhaps in front of the TV

you think you're a flowerpot because you've got a hole in your bum: you love yourself

zed: Z

Edited by rowal5555, 09 July 2007 - 05:50 AM.

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#14 xcr0okedx

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Posted 09 July 2007 - 04:28 AM

i am in my early 20's from New York City so i wont bother posting up my slangs because they are on the graphic side


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#15 DSTM

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Posted 09 July 2007 - 04:48 AM

Excellent 'rowal5555'.We are so close Geographically and yet hadn't heard a lot of those.
By your Slang,I'm classed as a "Fitter and Turner" LOL.

'xcr0okedx'
Would like to hear the Family friendly one's. :thumbsup:
We have so many American Tourists,and can't understand their Slang,most of the time.


















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