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Intro To Programming, Can Someone Help Me Out?


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11 replies to this topic

#1 monkpart9

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Posted 28 June 2007 - 03:27 PM

Ok, so now i want to learn how to make programs, surely theres alot of work involved in programming, but i was wondering if anyone can give me a tutorial on making programs or maybe give me some other info that would prove useful.
If you do things right, then people won't know if you've done anything at all.

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#2 ussr1943

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Posted 28 June 2007 - 04:45 PM

Well theres one thing you have to do first.
Pick a language :thumbsup:

There are many types of programming languages and most programming languages can do any job, some are more efficient than others, some or more newbie friendly than others.

Any ways here are some languages
Visual Basic
Java
Pascal
Fortran
C
C+
C++
C#
Cobol
Python

please note this isn't all the languages there are literally hundreds of them
A few good beginner languages would be
Visual basic
Python(atleast from what I have heard)

But you can really pick any language your interested in and find tutorials online, or at a book in the library. Note that for each language there are different compilers and IDEs. Compiling is simply turning the code you write into code the machine can interpret, and an IDE is an Intigrated Developement Environment (like a complete package of what you need for programming for w/e language)

I hope I have helped you some, I would difinately stick around and see what other people post as I know we have some good programmers around here.
"Ideas are far more powerful than guns."
"The only truly secure system is one that is powered off, cast in a block of concrete and sealed in a lead-lined room with armed guards -- and even then I have my doubts." --Eugene H. Spafford
"One man's terrorist is another's freedom fighter"

#3 jgweed

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Posted 28 June 2007 - 06:13 PM

There is a very good thread, somewhat long but well worth reading, discussing learning programming and programming languages:

http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/forums/t/1817/what-programming-language-should-i-start-with/

I think many of your questions may be clarified, if not answered, by reading the thread.
Cheers,
John
Whereof one cannot speak, thereof one should be silent.

#4 Nikas

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Posted 29 June 2007 - 07:51 AM

To add on, if you want any tutorial. Just post and let us know. I have quite a number of tutorial of different language. I can post it if you want.

#5 monkpart9

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Posted 29 June 2007 - 09:53 PM

Thanks guys.

jgweed i checked out that thread that you posted and it helped alot, after Im done reading the tutorial on html that nikas gave me earlier(thanks nikas) ill start to learn C++.


Whats the difference between C,C+, and C++? are C and C+ lower versions of C++?

O and thanks ussr, i havent even heard of half of those languages previous to this post.

Edited by monkpart9, 29 June 2007 - 09:54 PM.

If you do things right, then people won't know if you've done anything at all.

#6 Nikas

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Posted 30 June 2007 - 04:56 AM

Here's the tutorial that you want, monkpart9.

C++ Tutorial

Lots of stuff in there and some other languages tutorial, code sample etc. Pretty good I think.

I'm not too sure about the differences.. Perhaps, wait for some other experts to give you the differences.

#7 Lathrup_Baseball

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Posted 03 August 2007 - 03:51 PM

Whats the difference between C,C+, and C++? are C and C+ lower versions of C++?


monkpart9, I learned a great deal about C++, and to a lesser degree C in college. Just to give a quick synopsis:

C - A procedure-oriented language which originated in the early 1970's used primarily in system programming, including implementing operating systems (very closely tied to UNIX for example). As a widely accepted language because of it's portability and efficiency, the compilers, libraries, and interpreters of other higher-level languages are often implemented in C.

C+ - Never heard of it, I am not sure this even exists, so I have nothing to say about it.

C++ - The language was designed as an enhancement to C, but is alot more than just C with a few new things. The key purpose of allowing for object-oriented programming previously unavailable in C. What is object-oriented programming you ask? Well, many things, but at the heart of it is the "object" like built-in data types: i.e. integer, floating point number, character, (these are pre-defined types; int, float, and char in C++) and state of the object: NULL (empty) or has a value (x = 5) as a few simple examples. A way to think about and remember exactly what object-oriented programming is about can be summed up by the following analogy: an object-oriented carpenter would be mostly concerned with the chair he was building, and secondly about the actual tools used to make it; someone who was a non-object-oriented carpenter would probably think primarily of his tools to build the chair.


You have the flexibility to create your own data types (objects) known as classes. With classes in C++ you can separate a program's interface from the implementation, as well as hiding the internal details of the implementation. The premise is that no one really should need to see HOW what you used implement as certain solution, they just need to know it does what they want so they can use it. For example, I had a programming assignment called "BigFloat" where we had to define a class called BigFloat, a numeric class similar to the built-in data types float and double, representing positive and negative numbers with at least 300 decimal places of accuracy. None of the C++ built in types allow for this much precision, hence our challenge to define it ourselves. A good example of what we had to do can be seen by looking at this BigInt program, which we used as an example and essentially does the same things our program had to, but main difference is BigInt allows for very larg positive and negative integers (whole numbers) and our program allowed for very large floating point/decimal numbers. Take a look at the BigInt Program here: http://www.emunix.emich.edu/~evett/DataStr...gFloat/bigint.h (header file) and http://www.emunix.emich.edu/~evett/DataStr...loat/bigint.cpp (source file or implementation file).

Although C++ offers alot of advantages over C and other languages, it also has some severe disadvantages as well:
1) C++ is far from a perfect language. It can be very challenging to learn and use, even for advanced programmers.
2) C++ is also not a very stable language, meaning the various compilers can tend to behave differently at times (platform portability concept mentioned above).

Don't be discouraged though, keep at it if you really want to learn it. That is all for now, good luck and I hope this helps.

Lathrup-Baseball

Edited by Lathrup_Baseball, 03 August 2007 - 03:53 PM.


#8 monkpart9

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Posted 03 August 2007 - 07:33 PM

Wow, this new info really has helped, i mean the info you displayed here goes into so much depth. Thanks for the help lathrup i really appreciate it. (and everyone else thanks too)
If you do things right, then people won't know if you've done anything at all.

#9 Lathrup_Baseball

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Posted 03 August 2007 - 09:33 PM

No problem monkpart9 and your welcome. I tend to get long winded sometimes and as you will find, there is not a whole lot of simple concepts in programming, particularly the C++ language. I have not programmed in C++ in several years, so I am actually going back over some of my old programs I did in college. I have plenty of simpler programs you can start out with and see what you come up with for solutions from my intro programming classes.

I can post some old programming assignments at any time and will be checking the programming board regularly for things I can also learn from others.

Lathrup-Baseball

#10 Cameus

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Posted 11 September 2007 - 12:59 PM

If you choose to go with C++ there's a book called "Teach yourself C++ in 21 days", it's preety good since it takes you in the proper sequence to learn the basics and then moves on to the more advanced subjects.
For newbies however I would recommend Visual Basic as an easier language to master, it's general purpose and it has a lot of peer support if you ever get stuck.

What is really important is the ability to discern how we want to process the information and/or the user interaction, how to translate our ideas into some structured process that will actually do the work we want it to.
Once you are able to write down the data process using plain english (pseudo-code), then translating that to a language that some compiler can understand becomes easier.

Finally, the choice of programming language is mostly irrelevant, some languages are better than others for certain kind of applications.
Once you get comfortable using any initial language and are able to make the computer do as you intended to, it will be easier to target a specific application environment and use the language that suits the specific application deployment best.

Regards,

#11 TheDoctor

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Posted 12 September 2007 - 01:35 PM

If you are interested in C/C++ i suggest to have a look at:

http://cplus.about.com/od/?once=true&

It's a very good site with a very good tutorial for all levels of programming.

#12 MattV

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Posted 30 September 2007 - 09:30 PM

One thing I rarely see mentioned when someone professes a desire to "learn programming" is the program design process. There are a couple of ways to approach program design.

One can spend days planning the interface between the user and the application, describing the data that will be input, how the data will be processed, and the desired output of the program. Without even going near a computer. Then, with the design of the program clearly outlined, one can then start producing code that will transform that outline into a finished application.

Another method is to develop a vague idea of what the program is supposed to do, and start coding away, adding, deleting, modifying, debugging code until you finally have something that works.

The first method is probably the best, though it seems that the second is the most popular. :thumbsup:




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