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Everyone In The Us Facing Jail Over Illegal Copying Of Music/software


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#1 stidyup

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Posted 17 May 2007 - 02:34 AM

US to allow internet snooping

When I originally read this I wondered how long before the RIAA wanted access to the information to combat music terrorism.....

theinquirer.net

THE LAND of the Free is considering bringing in a new thought crime which is thinking about software or music piracy.

Details of Attorney General Alberto Gonzales' Intellectual Property Protection Act of 2007, will criminalise "attempting" to infringe copyright.

It means that you can go to prison for one to 10 years for trying to copy a music CD and failing. In another move you could get life in prison for using a pirated copy of Windows on your home PC.

It will be possible for the FBI to get a wire tap to see if you are using pirated software. Anyone who uses counterfeit products who "recklessly causes or attempts to cause death" can be sent down for life. The Justice Department says an example of this will be a hospital which uses pirated software instead of paying for it.


theinquirer.net

THIS MORNING THE American government is seriously talked about locking people up for life for making illegal copies of Windows. We should not be too surprised, for the last two or three years this idea of stealing people's ideas, music or videos has been a major obsession, particularly with American law makers.

To an observer, the US legal system lookss pretty much a pile of lunacy, where vengeful reactionary laws are bypassed by the rich. The Paris Hiltons of this world get their sentences cut and the poor end up being sentenced for years for the same offence. But it will finally reach the point of absurdity when you can be locked up for life because someone copies a bit of software or a song.

The RIAA can bleat, "hey it is theft". But even that argument wears thin when you start locking up people for life for it. We seem to have returned to the 18th century, when the UK transported people for stealing a sack of potatoes or hung you for stealing a horse.

Allowing rich and powerful pressure groups that much control of the legal system is dragging it backwards and lowering the standards of the universe.


I wonder how long before MS steps in to help enforce it???

"MS Windows has detected an illegal operation, you have wilfully committed a thought crime by attempting and failing to illegally copy a music CD."

MS Justice (related to Dr Watson) has found you guilty and contacted the police with your information, please stay by your computer until law enforcement officers arrive.

MS Justice has already sentenced you to 10 years hard labour for your crime against humanity and the music industry.

Please note that if you had run a multi million dollar company and defrauded the shareholders out of millions you would have got 6 months.

MS Justice is copyrighted under the appropriate laws, Microsoft thank you for your custom and now revoke your licence as you are not allowed to use MS Windows for criminal activity or attempting any such activity.

We hope you think about the struggling artists in one of the many different homes around the world while you do serve your sentence for your crime.

Delivering Justice on behalf the RIAA and MPAA

Its seems that America is just delivering laws for the corporates rather than the people.

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#2 JohnWho

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Posted 17 May 2007 - 08:14 AM

"Everyone In The Us Facing Jail Over Illegal Copying Of Music/software"

Hmm...

I'm willing to share a jail cell with Paris Hilton.

:thumbsup:


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#3 groovicus

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Posted 17 May 2007 - 08:39 AM

Its seems that America is just delivering laws for the corporates rather than the people.


Laws were originally created to cater to the wealthy. Without going into a history lesson, property owners were the first to demand laws to protect their property (thousands of years ago). Poor people didn't have anything to protect. (An eye for an eye simply means value for value) Laws protecting the disadvantaged are relatively new.

The interpretation of the article is a bit broad. (Gosh, a journalist sensationalizing a news story...gasp). The entire act is available here:
http://politechbot.com/docs/doj.intellectu...2007.051407.pdf
The proposed bill is only 8 pages long.


So before we start a discussion based on....ummm... creative interpretations of an act, how about we read the act for ourselves and try to understand what it is really proposing:
1) Attempted acts of copyright infringement should be prosecutable. That seems perfectly reasonable. We prosecute for attempted murder, attempted robbery, attempted rape, etc. That is consistent.
2) Wire Taps and surveillance in cases of economic espionage should be permitted. Again, that is reasonable, and is already common in Federal investigations.
3) There is a difference between criminal infringement and inadvertent infringement.
4) Property used in criminal infringement should be forfeited. We already do that to drug dealers.
5) Copyright infringement as an act of economic espionage should be punished more severely. We already have pretty stiff penalties for agents of espionage. This just expands on the definition of what constitutes espionage.

You are not going to go to prison for 10 years for copying a music cd. You will go to prison for ten years if you attempt to make 100,000 copies of a cd.

In another move you could get life in prison for using a pirated copy of Windows on your home PC.

And a thousand screaming monkeys could come flying out of my bum, but what are the odds? However, if you make counterfeit copies of Windows and sell them as genuine, and it can be proven that it has harmed the nations economy, then maybe you will go to prison for life. It could be worse, acts of espionage during wartime is usually punishable by a bullet... or a noose..... or electricity....

#4 JohnWho

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Posted 17 May 2007 - 08:47 AM

You are not going to go to prison for 10 years for copying a music cd. You will go to prison for ten years if you attempt to make 100,000 copies of a cd.



Ah,

only 99,999 copies to go,

and Paris will be mine!

:thumbsup:


I know you think you understand what you thought I said,
but I'm not sure you realize that what you heard is not what I meant!


#5 fozzie

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Posted 17 May 2007 - 08:53 AM

Interesting discussion.. Points made by groovicus are valid ( as almost allways) but... :thumbsup:

The principle of misappropiated content is very much in common. As far as I am concerned they should go for the sites enabling sharing. If you look at the larger torrent sites with well over 3 or 4 million working and downloadable files they should be the ones put behind bars. If you do the math on copyright infringement the amounts involved are enormeous.

#6 stidyup

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Posted 17 May 2007 - 09:30 AM

Admin Note: Off topic comment removed

#7 cowsgonemadd3

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Posted 17 May 2007 - 09:55 AM

I was at a flee market in florida about 3 or 4 years ago. I started looking at these guys pc games and dvds. I could tell they were fake.

So we went and talked to a cop right around the corner. He told me that unless he has over 10k worth of stuff they cant even touch him. I went and bought one of his REAL pc games.

#8 jwinathome

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Posted 17 May 2007 - 10:04 AM

Tonight jwinathome was executed for allegedly having a pirated copy of Windows XP on 3 of his home computers....However, the latest update from Microsoft says that Genuine Advantage generated a false positive in jwinathome's case...Mr. Gates personally sends his condolences and a free trial of Office 2007 (to expire after 90 days) to jwinathome's immediate family.

#9 JohnWho

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Posted 17 May 2007 - 12:00 PM

I'm extending my condolences to your immediate family

on their receipt of the Office 2997 trial CDs.

:thumbsup:


I know you think you understand what you thought I said,
but I'm not sure you realize that what you heard is not what I meant!


#10 ussr1943

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Posted 22 May 2007 - 04:17 PM

This is going to get crazy, As a music artist myself (not necciserily a big artist) I do believe in having rights to your intilectual property, But I woulnd't want one of my fans to go to jail because I was so greedy(or that the gov't stepped in) to get that extra 10$ to help buy a gold plated hummer that I don't need. Furthermore this shouldn't be regulated by the gov't I can just see things that are going to happen, mainly losing the right to privacy, you can just see the uses for this. First it will be the gov't stepping in to help companies next it will be a gov't worker just checking to what site you have been to, and on and on.
As for microsoft, I consider them a monoply on the OS market and this is just another harsher way to get people to stop using their software, as for this pirated ver. stuff If I get procecuted for using an illegal copy when infact I bought the computer unknowingly that it had an illegal copy, what will I do? Microsoft can afford to buy the biggest and the best lawers.

Edited by ussr1943, 22 May 2007 - 04:20 PM.

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"The only truly secure system is one that is powered off, cast in a block of concrete and sealed in a lead-lined room with armed guards -- and even then I have my doubts." --Eugene H. Spafford
"One man's terrorist is another's freedom fighter"

#11 Mr Alpha

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Posted 22 May 2007 - 05:27 PM

Don't you already have laws against industrial espionage? Wont adding more just lead to complexity and greater legal expenses for everybody?
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#12 kimgeni

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Posted 23 May 2007 - 05:59 PM

I get a bit carried away, but whatever.

"Rafael Leonidas, Idi Amin, Adolf Hitler and their Associates are people no one wants to mess with" (Dure Kmick)
Do you see it? RIAA.
I will not go as far as Dure, however I think he has a good point. None of the persons mentioned above were able to see what's best for people, and I dont think RIAA are either. Of course there has to be a law that protects the copyright owners, but filesharing is a good and not a bad thing. It gives people the oportunity to listen to many songs on an album to see if its something you want to buy, to discover new music, to download an episode of your favourite show in case you missed it on TV, to get even more interested in music, to listen to songs you never would have lisend to if you had to pay for them.
Several surveys show that those who download the most, are the same people who buy most. Why would anyone put the people who spend the most money in jail? It must be possible to find another solution.

Does RIAA play by the book?
RIAA has tried to go after the family to a person who died (but backed of after negative publisity), Are you responsibly for what your family does?
RIAA wants to avoid court and tries to push everyone to pay out to avoid court. Pay 20 000 now or 200 000 when you loose in court. This isnt fair play. Most people cant afford to pay 20 000 and cant risk loosing in court. Even if you've just shared 3 songs they can come after you with such demands.
Copy protection on CD and DVDs: If I've bought a CD and I want to have one copy on my PC,, one in my record collection, one in the car, one at my job, ect ect. Should n't I be allowed to? What if the CD breaks and I wasnt allowed to make a copy?
Sony installed rootkits on PCs.
RIAA tries to kill independent internet radios, and demand license fee for artists that aren't members of RIAA, and dont want such money. If the artists want the money that RIAA collects, they must become RIAA members. Sound more like mafia than a record company.

Why pay for 128 bitrate with DRM? Never done it, will never do it.
The music industry is old and cant renew itself. The initiative from Spiral frog is good but this should have happened 10 years ago, and the big record companies have spent way to much time negotiating instead of providing solutions.

A couple of days ago the US passed a law wich forbids spyware. Spyware = criminal activity. File sharing = not legal. Why does the US pass these laws at the same time? The spyware problem is much more serious and should have been passed a long time before this copyright thing. How much did RIAA pay?

Im frustrated 'cause I think RIAA and MPAA are handling the situation wrong. MPAA has even broken linkware rights, and how can you take them seriosly when they operate in such maners?
File sharing of all kinds of files would have been great for me, insted Im stuck with common creative and other free stuff. I find many great songs there, but I want more. Since I got interested in common creative I've discoverd new artists and Im more interested in music in general. As a resuly I've spent more money on music. What if I could donwload everything I wanted to? More money to the industry.

By the way, if you haven't heard Weird Al's Dont download this song, I suggest you pay him a visit. He's got a couple of good points.

#13 ComputerWhizz7

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Posted 23 May 2007 - 06:18 PM

This is crazy, if this happens the government will be making more money plus TAX payers will have to pay more for the criminals to be in jail! Music won't be heard as much I don't think because not everyone is rich. This is really really stupid! :thumbsup:
I came, I saw, I conquered. - Julius Caeser

#14 groovicus

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Posted 23 May 2007 - 06:31 PM

Why does the US pass these laws at the same time? The spyware problem is much more serious and should have been passed a long time before this copyright thing. How much did RIAA pay?


The US passes these laws because elections will be coming up again. Legislators can say they are tough on digital crime, blah, blah, blah. The Internet can not be regulated by any government (in spite of the fact that some countries try awfully hard). It is painless to pass such legislation; it costs very little to pass such legislation. And in the end, it does nothing.

@kimgeni; theft is theft. The only way they can see to stop it is by creating as harsh as possible penalties. Think about it.. if the death penalty was handed out for drunk driving, how do you suppose that would effect the rate of drunk driving? Just because someone spends more money than someone else doesn't mean that they should be immune from prosecution. Don't do the crime unless you can do the time. Period. And if you can't do the time, then you better be smart enough to find your way between the cracks.

#15 Queen-Evie

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Posted 23 May 2007 - 06:44 PM

Does that mean I cannot make a back-up copy of a cd I purchased? Every cd I buy, that's what I do.
I don't give it to anyone else, it's strictly for me in case something happens to the original cd.
Well, mostly what I do is keep the original in it's case and listen to the copy. I feel that if I paid for a cd I should be able to at least back it up. I'd rather have something happen to the copy instead of the original which usually has 2 or 3 good songs, and the rest not good at all.




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