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keeping programs from being installed


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#1 Ataryu

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Posted 17 January 2005 - 01:57 AM

Is it possible to keep someone from installing certain software on your computer? A way to have your computer deny the installation of a certain program.

Thanx for your help.

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#2 Leurgy

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Posted 17 January 2005 - 10:53 AM

What is your operating system? One way to do that would be:

For some reason Install on demand is enabled by default in IE. To protect yourself against this situation do this:

In Internet Explorer go to Tools>Internet Options>Advanced and take the check mark from Enable Install On Demand (Internet Explorer) and Enable Install On Demand (Other). The consequence of this will be that you will begin to see Security Warnings when something tries to install on your computer. Unless it is something you want to install (which happens rarely) always say no.

When the only tool you own is a hammer, every problem begins to resemble a nail. Abraham Maslo

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#3 Ataryu

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Posted 17 January 2005 - 01:12 PM

Im running XP, and I don't mean just over the net. Like if someone came to my computer and tried to install a program from a cd. Is there anyway I could keep that program from being installed?

#4 Leurgy

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Posted 17 January 2005 - 01:27 PM

Yes. Set yourself up as admin with a password and only let them log on with a user account and set the permissions for the account so that they can't do that.

When the only tool you own is a hammer, every problem begins to resemble a nail. Abraham Maslo

**** We use our powers for good, not evil ****

 Trying to remove your data from the web is like trying to remove pee from a swimming pool


#5 Ataryu

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Posted 17 January 2005 - 03:56 PM

Umm, and not like that either. It's not neccasarily a security problem.

Situation:

My friends father uses a program called watchdog, and maybe other similar software to log everything she does on the computer. She has un-installed it, and I was trying to figure out a way to keep her dad from re-installing the software. She is 16 and he is way to over protective.

#6 Leurgy

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Posted 17 January 2005 - 04:03 PM

Sorry. I don't think anyone on this board is going to help you try to defeat the security on someone else's computer. I know I'm not going to.

Its his computer and he can do whatever he wants with it.

When the only tool you own is a hammer, every problem begins to resemble a nail. Abraham Maslo

**** We use our powers for good, not evil ****

 Trying to remove your data from the web is like trying to remove pee from a swimming pool


#7 Ataryu

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Posted 17 January 2005 - 06:11 PM

I speak for the person who owns the computer.

No one has the right to invade some ones privacy.

And if parents knew how to be parents they wouldn't need to.

The only thing parents get from being overly protective and invading their child’s privacy is deceit and rebellion.

They should gain their child’s trust not their hate. I can tell my parents almost everything I do. They have taught me right from wrong, and they trust me to be able to make my own choices; as long as I don't lie to them, and I don't.

Parents ask for rebellion and deception.


Anyone willing to help this poor child?

#8 Leurgy

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Posted 17 January 2005 - 06:19 PM

Until your friend reaches legal age her parents are legally responsible for her actions. And she can't legally own anything.

When the only tool you own is a hammer, every problem begins to resemble a nail. Abraham Maslo

**** We use our powers for good, not evil ****

 Trying to remove your data from the web is like trying to remove pee from a swimming pool


#9 groovicus

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Posted 17 January 2005 - 06:33 PM

I'll gladly help you out if you can tell me which Amendmant of the Constitution says we have a right to privacy ? (assuming this is taking place in the USA of course). :flowers:

EDIT: and let's please keep this thread civil. There is a potential for learning from this thread, and I would hate to have to remove it. :thumbsup:

Edited by groovicus, 17 January 2005 - 06:43 PM.


#10 Ronbo

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Posted 17 January 2005 - 06:39 PM

They should gain their child’s trust not their hate. I can tell my parents almost everything I do. They have taught me right from wrong, and they trust me to be able to make my own choices; as long as I don't lie to them, and I don't.

You talk about trust and yet here you are going behind your friends parents backs to try to do something they don't wish your friend to do, apparently with your friends support.

Doesn't sound very trustworthy to me.
There is no justice, there is just us.

#11 Ataryu

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Posted 17 January 2005 - 07:32 PM

Like I said, parents ask for deception and rebellion.

But I think we should stop before we start a debate, thats not what this topic was started for.

#12 tg1911

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Posted 17 January 2005 - 07:36 PM

Like I said, parents ask for deception and rebellion. ....

Parents ask for respect.
No respect = no trust
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#13 Ataryu

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Posted 17 January 2005 - 07:36 PM

I'll gladly help you out if you can tell me which Amendmant of the Constitution says we have a right to privacy ? (assuming this is taking place in the USA of course). :flowers:

EDIT: and let's please keep this thread civil. There is a potential for learning from this thread, and I would hate to have to remove it. :thumbsup:

Here's your right to privacy:

Amendment IX:
The enumeration in the Constitution, of certain rights, shall not be construed to deny or disparage others retained by the people.

Amendment X:
The powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the States, are reserved to the States respectively, or to the people.


But then again, that has to do with the government, not our parents.
I still think everyone has a right to privacy though.

Edited by Ataryu, 17 January 2005 - 07:37 PM.


#14 Ataryu

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Posted 17 January 2005 - 07:41 PM

Like I said, parents ask for deception and rebellion. ....

Parents ask for respect.
No respect = no trust

How does respect have anything to do with the topic at hand.
Well, besides the fact that you should respect someones privacy.

You don't know wether this person respects her parents or not, so your statement is irrelavant. But from what I know she is very respectful.

#15 groovicus

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Posted 17 January 2005 - 08:25 PM

Ok, where does that say that you have a right to privacy?

For instance, the First Amendment speaks of freedom of speech:

....abridging the freedom of speech


Freedom of speech is an explicit right.

The Ninth Amendmant states that only that the intent of the Constitution is to not limit the rights of others, nothing more,and has more to do with religious freedoms. In fact, the Supreme court can't even agree on the exact intent of that particular Amendment.

The 10th Amendment limits the power of the federal goverment over the states..nothing more.

********

Now for a little lesson. The Fourth Amendment states:

The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized.


Although not explicitly stated, the Supreme Court in 1968 (?) determined that a right to privacy was implied, but only in the context of 'unreasonable'' , and is meant as protection from the government.

The Fourteenth Amendment states thus

No State shall make or enforce any law which shall abridge the privileges or immunities of citizens of the United States, nor shall any State deprive any person of life, liberty or property, without due process of law.


Again, the right to a certain amount of privacy is implied, but not explicit, and the 4th and 14th Amendments are the crux of Roe V. Wade.

*******

The lesson here is that there is no right to privacy. The right in question here is the right of a parent care for the welfare and safety of their children. Of course, you won't understand that until you have children of your own.

I still think everyone has a right to privacy though.



What you think has no bearing on the laws of the land (at least until you are able to vote)

But I think we should stop before we start a debate, thats not what this topic was started for.


Then you shouldn't have said this:

No one has the right to invade some ones privacy....
My friends father uses a program called watchdog, and maybe other similar software to log everything she does on the computer. She has un-installed it, and I was trying to figure out a way to keep her dad from re-installing the software. She is 16 and he is way to over protective.


You were trying to get the members of this board to help you circumvent protections put into place by someone's parents. I'm a parent, and I will do everything I can to protect my children. I'm not here to be their friend. I am here to protect them, and teach them how to survive in a world that they can't possibly understand. That means my kids get mad at me a lot.

Whether I agree or not with their methods, it is their child, and I definately not entitled to tell them how to do it. That is what respect has to do with this topic.

You opened a contraversial subject, you had better expect to get called out on the carpet for it, especially when you can't possibly understand the complexities of raising children. I don't care if you have kids or not..merely having kids doesn't mean you know what it takes.




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