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Ghost Image Size


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7 replies to this topic

#1 thrillhouse

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Posted 11 May 2007 - 02:50 PM

I have 33.3 gb of stuff on my hard drive. If I make a ghost image of this, can someone tell me how big the image file will be?

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#2 Animal

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Posted 11 May 2007 - 09:45 PM

First of all I am assuming that by "ghost image" you are referring to the Symantec product of the same name.

Here is a quote from the web that may enlighten you.

I have contacted Symantec support and got a reply that clears up my
problem:

"XXXX, please be aware that when Ghost is running a backup task it
requires more space to store the backup image. The destination drive
space should be higher than the source drive."


Note: The "problem" mentioned within the quote was "why didn't a 42 GB image fit in 42 GB of available drive space."

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#3 thrillhouse

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Posted 12 May 2007 - 12:34 AM

that is what I was talking about, thank you

#4 usasma

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Posted 12 May 2007 - 07:20 AM

While I'm not familiar with Ghost, Acronis True Image allows you to pick different levels of compression to save space when storing an image.
My browser caused a flood of traffic, sio my IP address was banned. Hope to fix it soon. Will get back to posting as soon as Im able.

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#5 thrillhouse

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Posted 12 May 2007 - 12:07 PM

cool, I'll look into it.

#6 Nikas

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Posted 13 May 2007 - 11:57 AM

While I'm not familiar with Ghost, Acronis True Image allows you to pick different levels of compression to save space when storing an image.


And normally, you will be able to save few gbs of space. Another good function is that you can do incremental backup. :thumbsup:

#7 thrillhouse

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Posted 15 May 2007 - 12:59 AM

Apparently Acronis wants 15gb of space at the highest compression level to for an image. I only have 8 gb of free space and that is after deleting a lot of stuff.

The whole reason I was doing this was to create a restore partition because my restore cd's are useless since I upgraded to XP from win2000 but I don't have the space to store the image and i don't have a dvd burner so I guess it's time to break down and get a bigger hard drive, ghost what I have on the 40 gb to that (presumably an 80 gb) and then create a restore partition on there.

I want to back up what I have because my xp cd was destroyed and if I have to reload I'd rather have xp and all my stuff than win2000 and stuff from 4 years ago when I bought the computer.

#8 Budapest

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Posted 16 May 2007 - 03:21 AM

Provided your original XP CD was genuine with a valid product key you could use any XP CD to restore your system if you need to. The product keys are not tied to individual disks, so you could always borrow a disk. This only applies if you have a full retail version, OEM versions are a little different and depend on the brand of computer.

Edited by Budapest, 16 May 2007 - 03:21 AM.

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