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slow boot on start-up/windows xp


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6 replies to this topic

#1 omega13

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Posted 15 January 2005 - 05:46 AM

I am running winXP.

I also have trouble with slow loading. Can you tell me where to find the list of startup programs, which ones are essential and what I can safely delete?

Edited by omega13, 15 January 2005 - 05:52 AM.

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#2 jgweed

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Posted 15 January 2005 - 10:37 AM

I have found

http://www.greatis.com/appdata/necessary.htm

to be extremely useful. It separates applications into four groups: necesessay, optional,useless, and dangerous.
A second source is:

http://www.answersthatwork.com/Tasklist_pages/tasklist_a.htm

which may have items not found in the first link;it does not give a lot of guidance about whether you can safely remove them, but enough information to allow you to make a decision.

Hope you find these two useful,
Cheers,
John
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#3 omega13

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Posted 15 January 2005 - 09:59 PM

Thanks John,
The first site you mentioned (greatis.com) is a gold mine. Just what I wanted.
:thumbsup:
Appreciate your help,
Joseph
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none is all.


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#4 pjmc1950

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Posted 04 December 2009 - 03:30 AM

The greatis.com file is no longer under that link.
I suppose someone deleted it or moved it elsewhere.

#5 OldGrumpyBastard

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Posted 04 December 2009 - 06:45 AM

FWIW,

The original posting was in 2005....Links come and go over a period of 4 years....
Does this look like an OldGrumpyBastard or what?

#6 hozerdude

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Posted 04 December 2009 - 09:20 AM

For Windows, a reliable & fast start-up often depends on how the system is put away.
Turning a Windows system "OFF" (from 'Start> Turn Off Computer...' button) is not the best way to put your system away for the night (or extended periods) and forcing a shutdown with the power button is NEVER a good option; only a last resort.
It prevents Windows from 'housekeeping' system files to get ready for the next start-up, and may, over time, cause file corruption; slow down; even break Windows.

A vastly improved method is 'Hibernation'.
Shutdowns using the 'hibernate' method gives several benefits: It's a near zero power state; all 'Startup' folder items are already loaded, Windows background services are already 'up', and all open work moves to the hard drive, yielding really fast start-ups.
And if power is lost (storms, etc.) the document or picture you were working on won't be lost like it would be in 'Standby' mode, and the system will resume just where you left it.

Go to Start> Control Panel> Power Options> Hibernate: here check the box.
To show this option when turning unit off; Start> Turn Off Computer> HOLD down 'Shift' key & 'Standby' becomes "Hibernate': tick that.
(Some systems have a 'crescent moon' key to go right to hibernate. (set laptops for this operation 'when lid is closed').
Emergency power outage can occur without any affect on the system; the trouble comes when the power is restored, which can cause a "spike" which will likely cause damage to the system (as with any configuration).

To start up, push the power button, and Windows will resume right where you left it, bada bing.

#7 pjmc1950

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Posted 05 December 2009 - 11:13 PM

Those are very helpful tips hozerdude.
I was not aware about the shut down issue.
My laptop does have a hibernate function, I just
thought it was better to shut down in order to not
have the computer running idly for too long a period.
Thanks for your reply.




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