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Windows Xp Or Linux


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#1 repairman

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Posted 01 May 2007 - 01:16 PM

I don't know that much about linux. What is the difference? and can you run windows on linux?

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#2 groovicus

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Posted 01 May 2007 - 02:33 PM

Windows and Linux are operating systems; that is, they provide the instruction sets required for software to interact with hardware, and vice versa. Windows is a trademarked Operating System owned by Microsoft. Linux is an open source Operating System first adapted from Unix by Linus Torvalds.
You can not run Windows on Linux (strictly speaking). that is a bit like asking if you can run AMD on a Pentium. There is software on which you can create virtual computers that allow Windows to run on a Linux system, or vice versa, but for all intents and purposes, they are completely separate. Windows is not an application that runs on Linux, and Linux is not an application that runs under Windows.

As far as differences, there are tons. Some time spent with your favorite search engine will provide way more information than what a few posts can provide.

#3 Monster_user

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Posted 01 May 2007 - 05:29 PM

As for running Windows Based Programs in Linux, there are two solutions. Virtual PC software, or WINE.

As for the differences,...

Windows is a single integrated solution. You have one file manager, one theme engine, one browser. One task for each, and they are included with Windows. One that the average user is aware of, anyway. Windows is a software bundle, which includes tools needed to maintain the computer.

Linux on the other hand, can be called many different things. A movement, a "kernel", a "breed" of operating systems, or any of a number of things.

Linux is very modular. I'm searching for the right words. Linux comes in several different parts. Each of these parts can be removed, swapped, or added to change the experience, and functionality.

There are "Distributions" that bundle these parts. They bundle several different programs together to create something that has the same, or more functionality than Windows. The software collection can vary greatly, depending on design, and need.

Linux is more secure by design. Windows Vista uses similar security measures, but they are not as polished. Things such as setting the time is a more difficult process in Vista, than in most Linux Distributions.

The process of installing software is fairly different in Linux. Many distributions have their own method. However, there are a few different types, Debian/APT, RedHat/RPM, are just two. Each distribution is practically a different Operating System.

You should not compare Linux to Windows, but compare Windows to the individual distributions.

RedHat = Windows Server 2003/XP Professional/Vista Business

Suse = Windows 2000 Pro/XP Professional/ Vista Business

Xandros = Windows XP/Windows 2000/Vista Premium/Business.

Ubuntu = XP Home/XP MCE/Vista Premuim.

D.S.L or Puppy Linux = Windows CE/Windows Embedded.

Personally I prefer the Debian installation method. Xandros, Ubuntu, Mepis, and several others are based on Debian.

This is just a quick overview. Linux is VERY different. Yet the basic use of the computer remains the same. You type with the same keyboard, you browse the web pages with a browser and a mouse. You select the "Print" option from a file menu. But they are still VERY different.

Edited by Monster_user, 01 May 2007 - 05:31 PM.

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#4 BlackSpyder

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Posted 01 May 2007 - 05:39 PM

If your asking if you show use Linux instead of Windows Xp Since your a novice I would say no. Try different Live CD Distros to get the feel of Linux before you make that decision. Once you get the hang of Linux and you find a Distro you like you can try Dual Booting both the Linux Distro and Windows so you can compare the 2 OS's side by side and decide which fits your needs

Good Live CDs to try are:
D.S.L., Puppy, Xbuntu (a derivative of Ubuntu), Fedora Core (Live DVD). There are so many its difficult to pick the top ones. check out http://distrowatch.com/

Edited by BlackSpyder, 01 May 2007 - 05:46 PM.

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#5 Monster_user

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Posted 01 May 2007 - 06:24 PM

Perhaps Xubuntu, or Knoppix. I wouldn't recommend D.S.L, or Puppy, if you want it to look pretty. Those two cut back on the themes, in order to save space. They are not more than a hundred megabytes. I doubt D.S.L has gotten over 60mb.
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#6 BlackSpyder

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Posted 01 May 2007 - 07:21 PM

Agreed. I was mearly trying to give the main forms of Linux equal showing. Slackware based, Debian Based, and RPM based. (oddly enough they are listed in that order above. But there is one I forgot to mention thats good and deserves to be mentioned "Mepis".

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#7 Trio3b

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Posted 05 May 2007 - 02:53 AM

I don't know that much about linux. What is the difference? and can you run windows on linux?


You can run Windows on Linux using a virtual server, but I would not recommend it for the noob.

If you are new, stay away from obscure distributions. It's not that they're no good, it's just that the user base will be small and therefore help may not be as available as for a bigger distribution.

As mentioned, try a live CD first to get a feel for Linux. Not all distros have live versions but most do. Not all Live CDs have installers. Live Cds may run slowly compared to a HD install since they have to uncompress on the fly.

Puppy, DSL, Austrumi and similar, are cool and work great but are designed to be as "lite" as possible. You can download additional software, but if you're used to a big feature-rich point n click interface you may be disappointed.

Debian and Slackware are two of the three grandaddy distros that many others are based on and are tried and true and solid, but are not for newbs. Here are some distros based on these two:

Vector and Zen are based on Slack and are a little more user friendly,

Debian derivatives:
Suse- Lots of good press and reviews, but taken over by Novell who made a deal with Microsoft (uhhgg!)
Mepis - very smooth
Ubuntu, Kubuntu is what's hot, but sorry......they're overrated with lots of hype. I hope Dell didn't goof by offering this distro preloaded!
Xandros - this software you have to pay for but is really well laid out and includes crossover to run some Windows apps.


Red Hat ( the third grandaddy distro) and its derivatives:
Fedora Core - tons of releases, huge bloated distribution. Some people swear by it but I've NEVER had any luck with it. ( I have been impressed with BLAG which is based on FC)
CentOS - I believe this is also a redhat distro - solid
Mandriva - been using this for business for 2 years
PCLinuxOS - based on Mandriva - I have been loading this onto customers' PCs

Top choices in no particular order:
PCLinuxOS, Xandros, Mepis, Mandriva, CentOS

There are a few other distros out there that are really good but it starts to get overwhelming if I keep listing them.

Remember, try a LiveCD first.

Hope this helps

Edited by Trio3b, 05 May 2007 - 03:09 AM.


#8 Joedude

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Posted 06 May 2007 - 04:58 AM

In the least possible terms, windows tells you how your computer should run, and does it for you. Most software and hardware are developed for windows which certainly does make a ajor impact on use and compatibility. With windows, if you wish to expand your computers abilities, add software, protect it from malicious stuffs, then you will pay for those products.

Linux has set defaults, other than that, you tell linux how you want your computer to run and what it will or won't have. Most (99%) of the software you pick up for it is free (as in free beer) and readily accessible through the internet. Linux is just starting to get a decent following with hardware drivers, however, the software world is still lacking. Having said that, there are many alernatives which are comparible to windows products. BTW, did I mention most are free (as in beer)?

Remember when choosing, you need to be willing to relearn somewhat of how to run your system under linux and it takes time. You will also have to adapt that there are some games and applications which may never get ported to it either. Having said that, With distro's like Mepis, Fedora, Ubuntu, and SuSE, you can remain a regular level user from the desktop and never have to mess with the terminal to modify it. Eventually though, you will want to, simply because you can.

Edited by Joedude, 06 May 2007 - 05:00 AM.

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DON'T DO IT!!!!
Be in the know, Bash smart!

#9 BlackSpyder

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Posted 06 May 2007 - 01:20 PM

free (as in beer)
Eventually though, you will want to, simply because you can.


Free Beer always comes with a price (LOL) you know like moving a couch or helping install an Engine in someones car.

Eventually you will learn to love the terminal because you can do things faster and better(in most cases) with it.

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