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My Computer Will Not Power Up


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#1 Aries

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Posted 27 April 2007 - 12:44 PM

My computer had been running slow. Then it started to shut itself down after a few weeks.
Now it won't even power up. I took it to a professional, he installed a new power box. He
said that should fix the problem. After it was installed, it still won't power up. He now says
it must be the CPU is fried. He wants to replace it, but I'm afraid he is trying to milk me
for as much money as possible.

My system is an e-machines w-2646 with an intel Celeron prossesor.
Could the CPU being "fried" cause the rest of the computer not to get power?
A new prosseor will cost me $70 he said. Would it be better just to get another computer?

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#2 Che Guevara

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Posted 27 April 2007 - 01:13 PM

Ok he's got to be milking you. With my experiences, I've fried a CPU myself before and the rest of my computer still got power it didn't run obiously, but it still turned on. You can take a CPU out and it will still power the system.

Ok, advice time, look inside the computer and see if there are any wires loose. Even if they're attached, push them in more to make sure they're seated properly. Then make sure the PSU is turned on and plugged in.

If it still doesn't work tell him to try another PSU that he KNOWS WORKS and tell him you want to see it run, and then tell him to connect it to the motherboard and try starting it up. If it doesn't start up then it might be the motherboard, but I don't see how it could be the CPU. I could be wrong but I just don't see how it could be.
Che

"Shoot, coward--you are only going to kill a man." - Che Guevara as he was then murdered as an unarmed prisoner by the Brazilian army aided by the US CIA

#3 jwinathome

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Posted 27 April 2007 - 01:21 PM

I agree Che...


I believe that the e-machines are notorious for having bad Power Supplies (among other things.) I would ask this person to test one just as Che said, that he knows works.

CPU would be the last resort.

#4 oldf@rt

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Posted 27 April 2007 - 02:45 PM

Agreed, he is trying to milk you. I have seen 4 bad cpus in my entire time in the IT field, (1976 on--)

emachines have a stand by led on the mainboard that is lit when there is power to the mainboard. if you open the side, you will see the led glowing if the power supply is good. If the motherboard is out, buy a new computer. if the new power supply is bad, replace it, but use a different professional. The one you used obviously did not check the machine properly.
The name says it all -- 59 and holding permanently

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#5 Sneakycyber

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Posted 27 April 2007 - 03:33 PM

I just fixed an E-machine with the same problem. IF you know the power supply works change out the motherboard. You should be in good shape then.

Chad Mockensturm 

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Certified CompTia Network +, A +


#6 JohnWho

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Posted 27 April 2007 - 04:22 PM

My computer had been running slow. Then it started to shut itself down after a few weeks.
Now it won't even power up. I took it to a professional, he installed a new power box. He
said that should fix the problem. After it was installed, it still won't power up. He now says
it must be the CPU is fried. He wants to replace it, but I'm afraid he is trying to milk me
for as much money as possible.


If he put in the new Power Supply as part of his diagnostic testing, and didn't charge you for it, then you shouldn't be paying for a new Power Supply at this time. That would be a reasonable situation, so far. If he can change the CPU with a used one to test the system now, that might be a step he could try.

I, and maybe we, are assuming he's disconnected all the unecessary components when trying to isolate the problem - no CD drives, no FDD, removed all cards except Video, and even tried it with the HD disconnected to see if the BIOS would boot.


I know you think you understand what you thought I said,
but I'm not sure you realize that what you heard is not what I meant!


#7 dfence

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Posted 27 April 2007 - 05:16 PM

Just my 2c worth. Last year i had my PSU fail, it was an "instant off" type failure not the result of any electrical fault external to my PC. When I replaced the unit with a new PSU i still had no boot-up ability BUT I did have a standby LED lit up.

Upon taking it to a professional, he swapped out my new PSU for a known working model, still no joy, he then swapped out the CPU for a known working secondhand unit. This resolved the issue, but all i paid for was the processor and a small labour charge. This professional has been in business for some 10 + years and advised me it was commonplace for PSU failures to send a "spike" through PC system components and that collateral damage is often the result. My machine was returned to a working state but never performed the same again, HDD errors, random hang-ups, even a blue-screen now and then.

Try the advice allready given here, have him swap things around, you may feel he's "milked" you but ask for the right things and you may get a better result. As for replacing the machine, see what happens once it's up and running again. It may be that your original PSU had spike protection built in that a lot of models from years past didn't have. Good Luck ;)
I'm not as think as you drunk I am




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