Jump to content


 


Register a free account to unlock additional features at BleepingComputer.com
Welcome to BleepingComputer, a free community where people like yourself come together to discuss and learn how to use their computers. Using the site is easy and fun. As a guest, you can browse and view the various discussions in the forums, but can not create a new topic or reply to an existing one unless you are logged in. Other benefits of registering an account are subscribing to topics and forums, creating a blog, and having no ads shown anywhere on the site.


Click here to Register a free account now! or read our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Photo

Why Are Files Being "added" To My D: Partition? (also Q's About Siw.)


  • Please log in to reply
26 replies to this topic

#1 bloomcounty

bloomcounty

  • Members
  • 672 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:06:47 AM

Posted 10 April 2007 - 09:31 AM

Hi,

I originally had a thread going here about defragging my hard drive C: and how that related to the D: partition, etc. But it's veered off into new questions/territory, so I'm starting this new thread. (Note that I did defrag my C: drive and did NOT defrag my D: partition, as per HP.)

Looking through the various defrag logs I made of my C: drive and D: partition, I have noticed the following:

1. C: Questions:

On 3/21, the defrag analysis log for C: showed that I had Total files = 71,432 and Total folders = 5,086.

On 4/5, the defrag analysis log for C: showed that I had Total files = 71,168 and Total folders = 5,073.
(Note that this was the log generated AFTER I defragged my hard drive, in which I deleted my temporary internet files prior to.)

On 4/9, the defrag analysis log for C: showed that I had Total files = 72,570 and Total folders = 5,086.

So that's quite the jump in files and folders. As far as I know, I have not added anything to my computer that would warrant an increase in over 1,400 files and 13 folders! :flowers: (Of course, some of this could be temporary internet files, so once I post, I'm going to empty those and check what this says again. [EDIT: Just emptied my cache in Firefox -- Total files = 72,036 and Total folders = 5,083 -- so that did not decrease it by much -- still a large increase from 4/5 to now.]

I did run SIW 1.67 for the first time yesterday (4/9) a number of times. And I did click on a variety of things in that program that generated lists of files, etc. within the program out of curiosity (all of which is the normal use of the program, as far as I know--?).

1a. Why would there be so many new files and folders on my C: drive from only 4/5 to 4/9?

1b. Does SIW 1.67 add any files to your hard drive? (I do see that it does add a file called siw_init.xml in C:/Documents and Settings/Application Data/siw -- more on that in further below... So does it add any files beyond this one?)

2. D: Questions:

On 3/21, the defrag analysis log for D: showed that I had Total files = 1,977 and Total folders = 93.

On 4/9 in the am, the defrag analysis log for D: showed that I had Total files = 2,034 and Total folders = 102.

On 4/9 in the afternoon (AFTER running SIW from the desktop on my C: drive), the defrag analysis log for D: showed that I had Total files = 2,038 and Total folders = 103.

2a. Why are new files being created on my D: partition if I'm not saving anything to it or accessing it (except for doing a defrag analysis log, which is saved to my C: drive)? Why would it go up 57 files and 9 folders from 3/21 to 4/9?

2b. The increase on 4/9 from before I ran SIW to after I ran it, could that be due to SIW? Would SIW also have saved a siw_init.xml to the D: partition? (I'm really hoping that's not the case, as you're not supposed to write anything to the D: partition...)

2c. Is this bad that files are being written to the D: partition (if that's the case)? I'm pretty sure HP said that you should not do this. (And I don't mean to be doing that...)

2d. When I run AVG free scan, Ad-Aware SE free scan, and SpyBot scan, I assume they're also scanning the D: partition -- but would any of those programs be saving files to it?

3. Other SIW Questions:

3a. What is this siw_init.xml file in C:/Documents and Settings/Application Data/siw? Iknow it's supposed to be a settings thing, but why is it saving settings when I haven't set any settings in the program, but juts ran it a few times?

3b. I accidentally double-clicked this file and it opened it up in IE6 (I use Firefox normally). I guess that file type is set to open in IE, and what happened was it showed some settings (or something) for the program (I guess) and I got a yellow "!" and it said it blocked something or other from showing to prevent information from my computer from being accessed or shown or something (that wasn't the exact wording). I was on-line when I did this. So what was this? And is it bad that I opened this file by accident? Could it have sent info somewhere?

3c. Can I delete that siw_init.xml file and folder it's in at any time? (Of course, if there's one on my D: partition, I wouldn't be able to get to it...)

I'm sure many of these are silly newbie questions, but the only way to learn is to ask (and I tend to be over cautious, which is better than not cautious enough, I say!).

Any help is appreciated -- thanks! :thumbsup:

Edited by bloomcounty, 10 April 2007 - 09:39 AM.

My stats: Windows XP Home SP2; Firefox 3.0.14 w/ Ad-Block Plus; IE 6.0 (used only for monthly Windows Critical Updates); ZoneAlarm 6.1.744.001 Free; AVG 8.5 A/V Free; SuperAntispyware Free 4.28.1010

BC AdBot (Login to Remove)

 


#2 Andrew

Andrew

    Bleepin' Night Watchman


  • Moderator
  • 8,260 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Not Telling
  • Location:Right behind you
  • Local time:05:47 AM

Posted 10 April 2007 - 09:41 AM

Off the top of my head I'd say that the additional files and folders are probably fom Windows System Restore.

Windows by defult makes periodic backups of certain files and saves them in a hidden and access restricted folder under the main directory in each drive called System Volume Information.

For example, the System Volume Information folder on my C: drive contains 748 files and 15 folders.

Windows keeps these backups for a period of time before deleting them. You can control how much space can be used by going to Start->All Programs->Accessories->System Tools->System Restore and click on System Restore Settings, selcting the drive you want to change and then clicking Settings. Move the slider to set the percentage of the drive that can be used for these backups (I use 3%). This is a per-drive setting so you need to set each drive individually.

#3 Andrew

Andrew

    Bleepin' Night Watchman


  • Moderator
  • 8,260 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Not Telling
  • Location:Right behind you
  • Local time:05:47 AM

Posted 10 April 2007 - 09:48 AM

When you say "SIW" I assume you mean the System Information Wizard program by Gabriel Topala?

If it is, then I have been unable to reproduce the /SIW/siw_init.xml file in my Application data folder after running SIW. If it is System Information Wizard then it should be perfectly safe to delete it. If it isn't, then let us knwo what you mean by SIW and we can go from there.

#4 quietman7

quietman7

    Bleepin' Janitor


  • Global Moderator
  • 52,059 posts
  • ONLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Virginia, USA
  • Local time:08:47 AM

Posted 10 April 2007 - 10:20 AM

System Information Wizard will create and save the siw_init.xml file in C:\Documents and Settings\%USER%\Application Data\gtopala\SIW\ (Win NT, 2000, XP, 2003 or Vista). From what I have read this configuration/settings file stores the size and position of the main window in SIW.

The only other files it will create are log files that you choose to create and they are saved in html format to the same folder where you placed SIW. Example: SIW_20070410_xxxxx_Computername.html
.
.
Windows Insider MVP 2017-2018
Microsoft MVP Reconnect 2016
Microsoft MVP Consumer Security 2007-2015 kO7xOZh.gif
Member of UNITE, Unified Network of Instructors and Trusted Eliminators

If I have been helpful & you'd like to consider a donation, click 38WxTfO.gif

#5 bloomcounty

bloomcounty
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 672 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:06:47 AM

Posted 10 April 2007 - 10:21 AM

Off the top of my head I'd say that the additional files and folders are probably fom Windows System Restore.

Windows by defult makes periodic backups of certain files and saves them in a hidden and access restricted folder under the main directory in each drive called System Volume Information.

For example, the System Volume Information folder on my C: drive contains 748 files and 15 folders.


Here's the list of the majority of the new fragmented files from my C: defrag analysis:

Fragments File Size Most fragmented files
Information\_restore{D5341F9C-33F7-43CF-8BD2-1AE937C9BA1B}\RP50\A0013576.mfl
52 3 MB \System Volume Information\_restore{D5341F9C-33F7-43CF-8BD2-1AE937C9BA1B}\RP50\A0013584.mfl
49 12 MB \WINDOWS\Internet Logs\tvDebug.log
46 3 MB \System Volume Information\_restore{D5341F9C-33F7-43CF-8BD2-1AE937C9BA1B}\RP50\A0013719.mfl
26 2 MB \System Volume Information\_restore{D5341F9C-33F7-43CF-8BD2-1AE937C9BA1B}\RP50\A0013613.mfl
23 1 MB \System Volume Information\_restore{D5341F9C-33F7-43CF-8BD2-1AE937C9BA1B}\RP50\A0013629.RDB
23 1 MB \System Volume Information\_restore{D5341F9C-33F7-43CF-8BD2-1AE937C9BA1B}\RP50\A0013624.RDB
23 1 MB \System Volume Information\_restore{D5341F9C-33F7-43CF-8BD2-1AE937C9BA1B}\RP50\A0013625.RDB
23 1 MB \System Volume Information\_restore{D5341F9C-33F7-43CF-8BD2-1AE937C9BA1B}\RP50\A0013615.RDB
23 1 MB \System Volume Information\_restore{D5341F9C-33F7-43CF-8BD2-1AE937C9BA1B}\RP50\A0013765.RDB
23 1 MB \System Volume Information\_restore{D5341F9C-33F7-43CF-8BD2-1AE937C9BA1B}\RP50\A0013269.RDB
23 1 MB \System Volume Information\_restore{D5341F9C-33F7-43CF-8BD2-1AE937C9BA1B}\RP50\A0013639.RDB
23 1 MB \System Volume Information\_restore{D5341F9C-33F7-43CF-8BD2-1AE937C9BA1B}\RP50\A0013504.RDB
23 1 MB \System Volume Information\_restore{D5341F9C-33F7-43CF-8BD2-1AE937C9BA1B}\RP50\A0013603.RDB


...so would that imply that the new files added to my C: drive are these system restore files, since those are the ones listed as being fragmented? (Don't know what tvDebug.log is...)

Do you also think the new files on the D: partition are system restore files? (There's only a few new files, as listed in my first post, as compared to the tons of new files for C:.)

I did find the settings for the System Restore stuff, though it was a little different to get to it than what you listed. My settings seem to be at 12% for C: and the D: partition. Those settings are from the factory.

Are system restore files supposed to be being created on the D: partition?

I could not find the System Volume Information folder on C: -- where would it be exactly?

When you say "SIW" I assume you mean the System Information Wizard program by Gabriel Topala?

If it is, then I have been unable to reproduce the /SIW/siw_init.xml file in my Application data folder after running SIW. If it is System Information Wizard then it should be perfectly safe to delete it. If it isn't, then let us knwo what you mean by SIW and we can go from there.


Yes, that's the program I'm talking about. I believe that siw_init.xml file is created by default when you run the program. So I'd think you'd have to have it (???). From the SIW faq http://www.gtopala.com/siw-faq.html

Q6. Where are the options saved?
A6. In a XML file:
C:\Documents and Settings\%USER%\Application Data\gtopala\SIW\siw_init.xml (Win NT) or C:\WINDOWS\Application Data\gtopala\SIW\siw_init.xml (Win 9x)


Thoughts?

Any further answers/help is appreciated, of course! Thanks for the post! :thumbsup:

Edited by bloomcounty, 10 April 2007 - 10:28 AM.

My stats: Windows XP Home SP2; Firefox 3.0.14 w/ Ad-Block Plus; IE 6.0 (used only for monthly Windows Critical Updates); ZoneAlarm 6.1.744.001 Free; AVG 8.5 A/V Free; SuperAntispyware Free 4.28.1010

#6 quietman7

quietman7

    Bleepin' Janitor


  • Global Moderator
  • 52,059 posts
  • ONLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Virginia, USA
  • Local time:08:47 AM

Posted 10 April 2007 - 10:29 AM

The System Volume Information folder is a part of System Restore - the tool that allows you to set points in time to roll back your computer. The System Volume Information folder is where XP stores these System Restore points and other information such as: Distributed Link Tracking Service databases for repairing your shortcuts and linked documents; Content Indexing Service databases for fast file searches; Information used by the Volume Snapshot Service (also known as "Volume Shadow Copy") so you can back up files on a live system.

This folder is hidden/protected by default and prevents programs from using or manipulating the files that are inside it. The files are inactive while in the data store and are not used by any utility other than System Restore. By default, the System Volume Information folder is a hidden folder unless you have reconfigured Windows to show it. You should not be tampering with this folder. Doing so could cause problems with proper system functioning.
.
.
Windows Insider MVP 2017-2018
Microsoft MVP Reconnect 2016
Microsoft MVP Consumer Security 2007-2015 kO7xOZh.gif
Member of UNITE, Unified Network of Instructors and Trusted Eliminators

If I have been helpful & you'd like to consider a donation, click 38WxTfO.gif

#7 bloomcounty

bloomcounty
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 672 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:06:47 AM

Posted 10 April 2007 - 10:40 AM

This folder is hidden/protected by default and prevents programs from using or manipulating the files that are inside it. The files are inactive while in the data store and are not used by any utility other than System Restore. By default, the System Volume Information folder is a hidden folder unless you have reconfigured Windows to show it. You should not be tampering with this folder. Doing so could cause problems with proper system functioning.


The only thing I did was to "show hidden files/folders" when I was looking for it, but didn't see the folder. I then turned off the show hidden files/folders (which is how I usually have things set). So does it not show up even with "show hidden files/folders" and you'd have to set Windows some other way to show it? (Not that I want to do that, and you don't even need to tell me how, I'm just wondering why I didn't see it and if that's how it works.)

So is it normal for my D: partition to be creating system restore files?

And was it okay that I checked the settings for that by going to Accessories/System Tools/System Restore -- then a Wizard came up, I clicked on "change settings" link on the left (did not run Wizard) -- a window popped up with tabs, then I chose the C: drive and clicked OK (or change maybe?) and it showed the slider with the percentage. I did not change it. Then I checked D: the same way -- did not change it. Then clicked cancel. Then just x'ed the Wizard window to close that. No foul there, right?

Thanks! :thumbsup:
My stats: Windows XP Home SP2; Firefox 3.0.14 w/ Ad-Block Plus; IE 6.0 (used only for monthly Windows Critical Updates); ZoneAlarm 6.1.744.001 Free; AVG 8.5 A/V Free; SuperAntispyware Free 4.28.1010

#8 Andrew

Andrew

    Bleepin' Night Watchman


  • Moderator
  • 8,260 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Not Telling
  • Location:Right behind you
  • Local time:05:47 AM

Posted 10 April 2007 - 10:40 AM

The System Volume Information folder is a hidden folder and it's a protected sytem folder. TO be able to see such folders, you need to open My Computer, click on the Tools->Folder Options menu, select the View tab in the box that comes up, click on Show Hidden Files and Folders and then remove the check mark next to Hide Protected Operating System Files (Recommended). Then click OK.

That should let you see the folder. You won't be able to access it without changing the permissions in the properties/security dialog.

Do you also think the new files on the D: partition are system restore files? (There's only a few new files, as listed in my first post, as compared to the tons of new files for C:.)


Yes, I believe so.


Are system restore files supposed to be being created on the D: partition?


By default, yes. You can turn it off from the System Restore settings box I described earlier.





I believe that siw_init.xml file is created by default when you run the program. So I'd think you'd have to have it (???).


It seems that the file is only created (for me) when you change settings in the program and save them. Therefore, it is safe to delete the file, but any customized settings you set will be lost. THe program will run normally (with all settings at their default position).

#9 Andrew

Andrew

    Bleepin' Night Watchman


  • Moderator
  • 8,260 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Not Telling
  • Location:Right behind you
  • Local time:05:47 AM

Posted 10 April 2007 - 10:45 AM

And was it okay that I checked the settings for that by going to Accessories/System Tools/System Restore -- then a Wizard came up, I clicked on "change settings" link on the left (did not run Wizard) -- a window popped up with tabs, then I chose the C: drive and clicked OK (or change maybe?) and it showed the slider with the percentage. I did not change it. Then I checked D: the same way -- did not change it. Then clicked cancel. Then just x'ed the Wizard window to close that. No foul there, right?



If you canceled, then no foul.

Even if you had changed some settings, it wouldn't have impacted your system in a negative way. Reducing the percent available will delete some restore points (oldest ones first) so your ability to Restore your system to a previous state would be reduced somewhat. Disabling it would (like it sounds) disable your ability to do a Restore.

Edited by Amazing Andrew, 10 April 2007 - 10:46 AM.


#10 Andrew

Andrew

    Bleepin' Night Watchman


  • Moderator
  • 8,260 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Not Telling
  • Location:Right behind you
  • Local time:05:47 AM

Posted 10 April 2007 - 10:49 AM

Here's an article that describes the System Restore settings
http://www.microsoft.com/resources/documen...s.mspx?mfr=true

#11 bloomcounty

bloomcounty
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 672 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:06:47 AM

Posted 10 April 2007 - 11:43 AM


Are system restore files supposed to be being created on the D: partition?


By default, yes. You can turn it off from the System Restore settings box I described earlier.


But I'm guessing I want to keep it as is, since it came that way from HP? Though that's weird that they say not to write anything to the D: partition, yet it's set to create system restore points to the D: partition...? Why would you have to have new restore points if you're not writing/changing anything on it?


I believe that siw_init.xml file is created by default when you run the program. So I'd think you'd have to have it (???).


It seems that the file is only created (for me) when you change settings in the program and save them. Therefore, it is safe to delete the file, but any customized settings you set will be lost. THe program will run normally (with all settings at their default position).


That's weird, because I didn't change any settings or save anything... I think I'll delete that file/folder and open the program again and see if it creates the file again. I'll let you know...

Also, any thoughts on question 3b.?

Thanks for the help! :thumbsup:
My stats: Windows XP Home SP2; Firefox 3.0.14 w/ Ad-Block Plus; IE 6.0 (used only for monthly Windows Critical Updates); ZoneAlarm 6.1.744.001 Free; AVG 8.5 A/V Free; SuperAntispyware Free 4.28.1010

#12 Andrew

Andrew

    Bleepin' Night Watchman


  • Moderator
  • 8,260 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Not Telling
  • Location:Right behind you
  • Local time:05:47 AM

Posted 10 April 2007 - 12:15 PM

XML files are displayed in IE by default. You can change this by changing the default file association. Firefox will display the same thing though.

#13 Andrew

Andrew

    Bleepin' Night Watchman


  • Moderator
  • 8,260 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Not Telling
  • Location:Right behind you
  • Local time:05:47 AM

Posted 10 April 2007 - 12:22 PM

But I'm guessing I want to keep it as is, since it came that way from HP? Though that's weird that they say not to write anything to the D: partition, yet it's set to create system restore points to the D: partition...?



I'm guessing that D: is the HP recovery partition (darned tightwads won't spring for a recovery CD so they steal part of your drive it...). If that is the case then there's no issue with system restore adding files. If there were, thousands of disgruntled users would converge on HP' and/or Microsoft's headquarters. That said, there probably wouldn't be any issue with disabling System Restore for D: but I've never done that so I can't be sure. My instinct is to leave it alone. I trust that HP knows and expects for SR to access/write to the D: drive. (I can't believe I just said that I trust HP!)

Edited by Amazing Andrew, 10 April 2007 - 12:24 PM.


#14 bloomcounty

bloomcounty
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 672 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:06:47 AM

Posted 10 April 2007 - 12:31 PM

XML files are displayed in IE by default. You can change this by changing the default file association. Firefox will display the same thing though.


But what was the deal with the warning (as described) and does it mean anything?

I definitely plan to continue to leave the D: partition stuff alone. It is the recovery partition. However, when I first got my laptop, it prompted me to create a recovery disk, which I did (took two dvds). So is that also the same thing (minus the added restore points since burning them), or something different?

Thanks!
My stats: Windows XP Home SP2; Firefox 3.0.14 w/ Ad-Block Plus; IE 6.0 (used only for monthly Windows Critical Updates); ZoneAlarm 6.1.744.001 Free; AVG 8.5 A/V Free; SuperAntispyware Free 4.28.1010

#15 Andrew

Andrew

    Bleepin' Night Watchman


  • Moderator
  • 8,260 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Not Telling
  • Location:Right behind you
  • Local time:05:47 AM

Posted 10 April 2007 - 12:36 PM

The warning is probably nothing, but I'm not an XML expert, so I could be wrong.

The DVD's are probably the same thing as what's on the D: drive. They probably asked you to make the disks in case the D: drive gets corrupted after a serious error.

But they still dpn't give you the original Windows XP CD. That's what I was harping about :thumbsup:

Edited by Amazing Andrew, 10 April 2007 - 12:36 PM.





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users