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Mandriva One - Linux (live)


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#1 Danvds3

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Posted 09 April 2007 - 03:53 PM

OK, just tried the live cd version of "Mandriva One". It was my first linux experience ever. Well first of all, I was running it on a very slow computer (400mhz and 326 SDRAM). It looked good but of course, no internet and incredibly slow. I would like to try it on our new Dell some time soon.

I would recommend this version of Linux to new and existing linux users as it is pretty versatile and easy to use.

I was originally hoping for the 3D cube/Sliding row for the app manager but it looks like "SuSe" has that to offer.

I'm actually scared to try it on this computer because it's new. The other pc i tried it on without the CD was still xp and everything was there but i'm unsure.

HELPFUL HINTS/TIPS :flowers:

OK, well first of all, this is what you need to do:
  • Download the .iso from the official Mandriva website
  • Burn the .iso file to disc making sure its set to "Boot Disk"
  • Insert the CD and re-start the PC
  • DONT push enter or F1 when it gives you the option, just let it load up
  • You will see a cut-off grey transparent box, after a few secs, hit ESC key and you will see a load of commands
  • Wait for these commands to FINALLY finish and the OS will load up
  • Select your keyboard, time and language settings
  • You're done with the Live! version, now just experiment!
Questions :trumpet:

1. I would like to know how to make the OS not live but permanent?
1a) In addition, how would I do this and would it affect my files/XP operating system
1b) how would I make partitions without affecting my XP and it's documents (Software links etc.)
1c) what would i have to name these partitions and how many?
1d) will linux setup (on the live version desktop) create a new partition and keep my other stuff like XP and documents safe?
1e) What tips would you give on the partition choices (i.e. New partition, Existing Partitions, free space on windows partition?)
1f) Finally I already have a spare partition on the Dell (C:\ - Local Disk) and (D:\ - Backup)

Could i use the "Backup" drive by renaming it and putting the files from it onto the local disk?

2. How do i keep my settings on the live version, if I can?
2b) It's run from the CD, how would I keep my settings, software and files?

3. Does linux(Mandriva) support WiFi (Belkin/Speedtouch) - both internet, network (windows) and the actual belkin dongle?

4. If you have any tips and stuff, please share them with me. - Also on the partitioning subject, try refrencing freeware (I hate software/commercial) - although you don't have to.

Thanks in advance, :thumbsup:
Dan :inlove:

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#2 Uraiser

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Posted 18 April 2007 - 11:14 AM

1. There is usually an option on the actual disk to install the OS

1a) It would effect it if you choose not to dual boot, meaning you can have more than one operating system at a time.. But you have to partition your HDD accordingly.

1b)I don't have any links on hand because I'm at school, but you can use Digital Dolly, Symantec Partiton Magic...

1c)You can name them whatever you want, but if I were you, I would name them to their respective OS

1d)Some linux distros have a partition tool, but its better to use a 3rd party package.. (only if you really know what you're doing)

1e) My tips would be to split your current partition, format to FAT32 (its just easier), and install linux on the FAT32 partition, along with a grub loader for dual booting. Then when you finally get around to installing linux, let it configure where the swap partition goes.

1f)You could use the backup partition if you feel comfortable knowing that you will never get all of those dell extra's back. I always get rid of the backup partition, dont need it. You may though, though yuo can have more than 2 partitions.

2) on a live version you can keep your settings on a USB thumbdrive.

2b)See above answer

3. Im not sure if it supports Wifi, I've never used mandriva.

I'll answer more when I get home, I'm in class.

#3 Monster_user

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Posted 19 April 2007 - 11:37 PM

I was originally hoping for the 3D cube/Sliding row for the app manager but it looks like "SuSe" has that to offer.


Well, Ubuntu is a good alternative, and makes it easy to install the 3D tools. Setting them up is another story, but there is a good howto. It is simple really. Figure out if you have a NVidia, or ATI/AMD video card, and then copy and paste a few things into a file, save, and reboot. ATI support is still 'iffy', but NVidia support is about 75% (guessing).


I would recommend putting Linux on an Ext3 partition, instead of a Fat32. Linux runs better on one of its native file systems. Ext3 is rock solid too. Reiser3 is a pretty good partition type, but some people have had problems with it.

I'm not sure if you can name most Linux partitions, like you can name a Fat, or NTFS partition. Fat32 is supported by both Linux, and Windows, so it is HIGHLY recommended that you have at least, one Fat32 partition.

---

I would recommend that you use the Backup partition. Repartition it as an "Extended" partition, and then create as many "logical" partitions as you need within it.


C:\ (Windows) [NTFS] - 30gb
[Extended]
-> Linux [Ext3] - 30gb
-> swap [blank] - 600mb
-> D:\ (Music, videos, documents) [Fat32] - 60gb

Tweak as needed.

This is mine.

160gb.

Windows C:\ [NTFS] - 4gb
D:\ [Fat32] - 60gb
[Extended]
-> swap - 600mb
-> Distro surfing - ~6gb
-> Backup [Fat32] - 10gb
-> Misc [blank] - ~40gb Just in case I find something I want to add later.
Xandros [Resier3] - 24gb.


When I made it, I foolishly put my main Linux distro, at the furthest from the swap partition. That made it slower...

Edited by Monster_user, 19 April 2007 - 11:39 PM.

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#4 Uraiser

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Posted 23 April 2007 - 10:58 AM

Is a swap really nessecary? I understand that it is basically the pagefile for linux, but if you have enough RAM, do you really need it?

Considering the fact that linux isn't really... Hardware intensive I guess I should say.

#5 Monster_user

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Posted 23 April 2007 - 11:32 AM

You don't "really" need it, but it is a good safety net. I'll give some info about the Linux SWAP, and let you decide for yourself.

Whenever Linux runs out of RAM, it switches over to a swap partition, and the system slows down. If it can't find a swap partition, it seemingly hard locks. It could take a day or more to process an "Alt-F4", or "Ctrl-C".

When Linux has an abundance of SWAP space, then it will try to move the data out of the RAM, and into the SWAP space. After the data has not been used for a while, I think. This is supposed to free up space for other programs. Linux does this whether you have 3gigs of RAM, or 128megs.

I always create a swap file, but I never make it more than a few hundred Megabytes. Between 200mb, and 600mb.

Edited by Monster_user, 23 April 2007 - 11:33 AM.

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#6 Uraiser

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Posted 23 April 2007 - 03:34 PM

Thanks for that, as I stated it serves the same purpose as windows "pagefile".

Im trying to learn linux.

#7 BlackSpyder

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Posted 23 April 2007 - 03:41 PM

I always like to leave at least the same amount of Space as the RAM I have however if i can I'll double it. My linux distros are usually very light so loosing 1GB to swap space is negligible even on a 20 GB hdd.

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