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Hack Windows Vista When You Forget Your Pass ;)


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7 replies to this topic

#1 Matthew Alan

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Posted 07 April 2007 - 07:11 PM

How to reset Windows Vista (or 2000/XP) password with a
special Linux distro when you are locked out your own system.
http://www.metacafe.com/watch/316013/hack_windows_vista/



EDIT: I didn't mean to post this twice

Edited by Matthew Alan, 07 April 2007 - 07:16 PM.


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#2 Walkman

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Posted 07 April 2007 - 07:29 PM

Here is the best hack of all, if you are the only one on your computer:

When you create a password for your account, inside of the Hint area incase you forget it, just simply put your password in there. Now if you ever forget your password, it'll be right there when you click on the Hint button.

Here is a XP Pro password tip from someone on that site:

hack xp without any program
if you forget your xp login password, just reboot the system and start hitting "F8" key and a menu appears there select the same mode. there you will see your account name and administrator account. click on administrator and then when the desktop appears right-click on my computer then click manage. a box pops-up. there double-click local users and groups then then click on users. on the right panel you will see your account. right click on that and select set password. the best thing is you will NOT be prompted for your old password. set the password and reboot the system normally to login to your account with your new password


On another note, what this program does is resets the password. It won't retrieve it.

Basically, you're adding more programs on your computer, which you don't need, when all you need to do is just put your password in your Hint area. Nothing to install, and nothing cluttering up my computer.

But maybe someone could find this useful.

#3 groovicus

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Posted 07 April 2007 - 07:50 PM

When you create a password for your account, inside of the Hint area incase you forget it, just simply put your password in there. Now if you ever forget your password, it'll be right there when you click on the Hint button.


So if someone gets a hold of my computer, then they should have no problem getting in, right?

#4 Walkman

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Posted 14 April 2007 - 02:16 AM

So if someone gets a hold of my computer, then they should have no problem getting in, right?

That's absolutely right. You couldn't have asked a better question. Good one!!

If someone gets hold of your computer, then you deserve what you'll get. Learn to protect your belongings is all I can say.

But, as usual, there will always be what is called a "Devil's Advocate". You always can manage to think the most negative about anything, although there is good within it.

And even if someone stole your computer, they can still get inside of the os, even if your password isn't stored in the Hint area..... just in case you didn't know that fact.

#5 Mr Alpha

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Posted 14 April 2007 - 04:24 AM

Saying "Don't loose the computer" is unreasonable. The point with laptops is that you can carry them with you. Anything you drag around the world run the risk of being stolen. That is why Microsoft introduced the whole BitLocker thing in Vista.
"Anyone who cannot form a community with others, or who does not need to because he is self-sufficient [...] is either a beast or a god." Aristotle
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#6 Walkman

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Posted 14 April 2007 - 05:19 AM

Saying "Don't loose the computer" is unreasonable

If you say so. But I would image you feel the same way about the FBI losing all those laptops, along with other equipment. They say they just don't know where the stuff went. Are you agreeing with that too? How hard is it for one person to keep up with one thing? Just one computer.... and you feel it's unreasonable to think that a person is careless at least, to let that most important, viable thing get lost, missing, or stolen?

Is that how you feel about all your personal and business data on that machine? Any one person that simply looses a computer is at least very incompetent.

The main thing I would have done with my laptop is to install a tracker. A tracker is software that you install on your laptop, or any computer for that matter, and if the computer gets stolen, and if it gets connected to the internet (most likely it will), then the software will pin point the location of the computer. The software is dormant, until you activate it, ., and you'll only activate it if it gets stolen or such.

As far as your computer being stolen, there are two differences.
1. Someone taking your computer from you without you knowing
2. Someone robbing you of your computer.

Although there's not much you can do about no#2, but there are many ways to prevent no#1 from happening, like:

a. be careful of who you bring into your home or wherever.
b. don't tell everyone about your computers
c. lock your computer to a desk or such. (most effective way)
d. don't leave your laptop laying around in strange places
e. get an alarm system put on the computer. (movement activated)
f. get an alarm system for your home or wherever.
and other ways too..

So, it's fair to say that if a persons computer just got taken/stolen, then that person didn't need it anyway and have no reason to feel offended when they know they got what they deserved.

But then there's this famous quote:

I pity the fool


Edited by Walkman, 14 April 2007 - 05:25 AM.


#7 Mr Alpha

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Posted 14 April 2007 - 08:52 AM

I'm not saying it is OK to loose a computer. What I'm saying is that assuming you won't loose the computer isn't an adequate protection of possible sensitive data on it. It might not be the guy who lost it or was robbed or something who ends up suffering. Not taking steps to protect sensitive data on the computer in case you loose it is irresponsible.
"Anyone who cannot form a community with others, or who does not need to because he is self-sufficient [...] is either a beast or a god." Aristotle
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#8 Walkman

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Posted 14 April 2007 - 09:10 AM

I totally agree with you on that one.

If you must have sensitive/personal information on your computers, you'd better be prepared and have it locked down... just in case.




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