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Video Memory - What Is It?


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#1 tekchallenged

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Posted 19 March 2007 - 11:30 PM

I've only recently bought computer games and looked at another one I liked the look of. The system specifications say you need 128MB video memory and 2GHz processor speed. I only have 1.8GHz and did some investigating and it looks like I have 64MB video memory. I've done some searching to find out what video memory is, but (as usual), I'm not sure I "get it".... Is it just part of your normal ram allocated to graphics? How do you get more, do you have to upgrade your ram? Any basic explanation would be appreciated.
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#2 dogslikeus

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Posted 19 March 2007 - 11:43 PM

video memory is RAM that is located on your physical graphics card and is used exclusively by it for storing textures and other things. the only way to get more would be to purchase a graphics card which has more memory on it. i think most modern cards come with at least 128MB, usually 256MB.

#3 tekchallenged

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Posted 20 March 2007 - 12:15 AM

Thanks, dogslikeus, Is changing the graphics card a simple thing, or horribly involved and guaranteed to make your computer never work again ( :thumbsup: )
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#4 Budapest

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Posted 20 March 2007 - 01:49 AM

How to Upgrade and Install a Video Card
The power of accurate observation is commonly called cynicism by those who haven't got it.

—George Bernard Shaw

#5 projectfocus

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Posted 20 March 2007 - 08:29 AM

When Installing a new graphics card it is important to make sure it is running on the correct drivers that come with the card. This will make sure that it runs at it's best performance.
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#6 dogslikeus

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Posted 20 March 2007 - 10:11 AM

it's really pretty simple. the link provided by budapest seems to contain a lot of good information, even if it is a little bit dated. the two most common slots for video cards today are PCIe and AGP, rather than PCI and AGP, but that's not a huge deal.

you just need to find out what slots on your mobo you have available, choose a card that fits that slot and your price range (and your power supply capacity) and then follow the instructions on that site. it's a pretty straightforward installation. just make sure to avoid static electricity and touching any of the shiny things :-p

#7 tekchallenged

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Posted 20 March 2007 - 11:22 PM

Thanks. I don't have enough speed to play that game anyway, but I'll file this away for future reference and if I'm feeling brave, I'll be able to do it.... :thumbsup:

Thanks again.
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#8 protozero

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Posted 23 March 2007 - 02:54 AM

Here's a little extra of an explanation. When your video card ( Wether it be Intergrated of not ) wants to draw a triangle ( In games thousands of triangles are being drawn among other things ) it reads and writes it to the memory, in this case your 64MB. And stores it for when it needs it and other things do shading, pixel filling, ect. In most cases more is better. Don't always go with what game specifications say. Memory isn't everything either, nor is the basic clock speed. Some games on the back only go by Intel chips and say you need a 2.6Ghz processor or more, but it's referring to Pentiums when lower clocked AMD's usuallly perform better as a Pentium with the same clock speed.

Could you tell us what game and maybe your computer specfications as well. Model number and manufactuer would be nice as well. Then we could see what slots you have on your motherboard, and if you can run the game.
Programming today is a race between software engineers striving to build bigger and better idiot-proof programs, and the Universe trying to produce bigger and better idiots. So far, the Universe is winning.

#9 tekchallenged

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Posted 23 March 2007 - 04:43 AM

Could you tell us what game and maybe your computer specfications as well. Model number and manufactuer would be nice as well. Then we could see what slots you have on your motherboard, and if you can run the game.


Thanks Protozero

I'm not that fussed about getting the game (it's a bit embarrassing to admit to, but you asked....Marvel Superheroes Ultimate Alliance :flowers: ), I was just asking because it's great to be able to extend what I know about these things (not much :thumbsup: ) I realised that something was "up" with the graphics card when another game I bought told me that my card wasn't right and it might not work properly (it does, I just get a warning when I load it) - that's why I thought to look at the specs at all. The only things that didn't match were what I mentioned before. The manufacturer and model number probably aren't that useful, because I bought it second hand from an office/government surplus reseller, so it could have been modified from the original specs.
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#10 protozero

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Posted 23 March 2007 - 07:25 PM

Alright, no problem with Marvel games. The Spider-Man games rocked and Marvel games are usually entertaining.

You could go to "Start", then click "run" and in the text box type "Dxdiag" ( It stands for Direct X diagnostic and will just scan your computer )

Or there's programs like Everest ( Uh.. you can good it and get teh free version, it works well ) They will show you very detailed things of you computer, to the exact frequency of your video card, heat, ect.
Programming today is a race between software engineers striving to build bigger and better idiot-proof programs, and the Universe trying to produce bigger and better idiots. So far, the Universe is winning.

#11 tekchallenged

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Posted 23 March 2007 - 10:14 PM

I had a look at the dxdiag, but I don't think that tells me anything about the motherboard? :thumbsup:
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#12 BlackSpyder

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Posted 23 March 2007 - 10:35 PM

Download everest home edition from the Freeware Replacements for Common Commercial Apps Thread. It will give you everything that your looking for (and then some).

Also, is your video integrated or card. If its integrated you can just upgrade the RAM on the motherboard to boost the Video RAM

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#13 tekchallenged

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Posted 23 March 2007 - 11:38 PM

Thanks BlackSpyder

Also, is your video integrated or card. If its integrated you can just upgrade the RAM on the motherboard to boost the Video RAM

You are asking ME? :thumbsup: I think it is integrated, it says it is Intel blah-dy-dy-blah graphics controller... (I would have expected a card to show up as a separate device???)
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#14 protozero

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Posted 24 March 2007 - 11:07 PM

It's intergrated then. Adding more ram won't do to much. There's a limit to how much shared memory a intergrated card can use. I'm almost positive that Intel ones max is 128Mb's. Some only have 64 though.
Programming today is a race between software engineers striving to build bigger and better idiot-proof programs, and the Universe trying to produce bigger and better idiots. So far, the Universe is winning.




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