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Why Is Connection A Lan?


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9 replies to this topic

#1 tekchallenged

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Posted 15 March 2007 - 06:38 PM

Can somebody explain to me why my new broadband connection is called a LAN connection? If I am on a LAN with the ISP, and my network settings are set to "trusted" in my firewall program, does that mean that I am not really getting any firewall protection? (My router firewall says it only works on WAN, not LAN) (I would have thought that my computer(s) would be the LAN, and that anybody else should be WAN.) I just don't get it, and reading has only increased my confusion and complete paranoia :thumbsup: Any explanation in terms a 2-y-o could understand would be appreciated.
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#2 Snapper

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Posted 17 March 2007 - 06:27 AM

firewall monitors incoming and outgoing traffic and tries to determine through various sets of "rules" that are preset and custom changed which programs/ports/ip's etc are allowed to come in and go out.

your firewall is blocking/monitorng ports that are available to use to pass through information.check out the description>>>http://compnetworking.about.com/od/basicnetworkingconcepts/l/bldef_port.htm

in brief, your firewall is providing you with adequate protection it was designed to do.
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#3 projectfocus

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Posted 19 March 2007 - 08:10 AM

The firewall will only work on connections outside off your network. The ISP is on the WAN (Wide Area Network) connection. You want this to stop connections from the WAN to the LAN (Local Area Connection). If you wished to stop ports within your LAN then you would need to use a Personal Software firewall on the local machines.

I would fthing the ISP would call it a lan connection if they have provided a Router that only supports the connection of Ethernet connections. This I suppose would minimise the confusion with Wireless connections.
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#4 tekchallenged

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Posted 19 March 2007 - 06:31 PM

Thanks projectfocus. It's XP that calls it a LAN connection. What you say in the first paragraph is why I'm asking. If the router only stops things outside my network and if the ISP is on a local network with me, then the router doesn't stop stuff coming from the ISP (ie all of the internet stuff)? And if the software firewall has the network as "trusted" it doesn't stop anything either?
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#5 projectfocus

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Posted 20 March 2007 - 05:41 AM

The ISP will not be on a local network with you. The router will always be inbetween the outside would i.e. ISP and your local LAN.
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#6 projectfocus

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Posted 20 March 2007 - 05:43 AM

When XP says Lan connection ot the ISP it really means LAN connection to the router. The ISP (Internet Service Provider) will always be the WAN side on the router. Sorry for the double post but I could not be bothered to edit the first one.
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#7 tekchallenged

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Posted 20 March 2007 - 09:10 AM

Thanks projectfocus. I think I understand what you are saying, but how does the router identify the connection to the ISP as WAN, rather than LAN? What is different about the connection to the ISP from the connection I would have to my other computer if I hooked it up through the modem? Is it the address which tells the computer its local network, or not? Sorry for all of the questions....
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#8 projectfocus

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Posted 20 March 2007 - 11:15 AM

Well Ok this may make it more confusing but I need to say it to be able to answer your question. The presentation of LAN and WAN is dependant on where you are siting.

For example Your WAN link is the ISP's LAN. The ISP's WAN is there Providers LAN.

So really it is all in referance to where you are in the loop. Lans and WANs are segragated by routers. Your Router will seperate you from the ISP's LAN and make that your WAN.

I hope that helps. I am not sure if that is that understandable.

Well Ok this may make it more confusing but I need to say it to be able to answer your question. The presentation of LAN and WAN is dependant on where you are siting.

For example Your WAN link is the ISP's LAN. The ISP's WAN is there Providers LAN.

So really it is all in referance to where you are in the loop. Lans and WANs are segragated by routers. Your Router will seperate you from the ISP's LAN and make that your WAN.

I hope that helps. I am not sure if that is that understandable.
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#9 tekchallenged

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Posted 20 March 2007 - 11:19 PM

Lans and WANs are segragated by routers.

But doesn't the router create a LAN if you connect two computers through it? Isn't it possible to have 2 (or more) computers on a LAN, where the computers are connected by a router and they are not at the same site? Or am I getting it all wrong? :thumbsup:
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#10 projectfocus

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Posted 21 March 2007 - 04:25 AM

This is were the confusion comes in. A router is a device to connect a LAN and a WAN. The routers that you get for ADLS and the link actually are routers and switch. This means that you have Network ports that are on the LAN aswell as the WAN port to connect to the outside world. If you think of the router doing to different functions it will make it easier to understand it's duties.

Have a look at this movie it will help you understand the jobs of each part of a LAN and WAN.

http://www.warriorsofthe.net/movie.html
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