Jump to content


 


Register a free account to unlock additional features at BleepingComputer.com
Welcome to BleepingComputer, a free community where people like yourself come together to discuss and learn how to use their computers. Using the site is easy and fun. As a guest, you can browse and view the various discussions in the forums, but can not create a new topic or reply to an existing one unless you are logged in. Other benefits of registering an account are subscribing to topics and forums, creating a blog, and having no ads shown anywhere on the site.


Click here to Register a free account now! or read our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Programming Languages To Learn.


  • Please log in to reply
5 replies to this topic

#1 Guest_danbrownlow_*

Guest_danbrownlow_*

  • Guests
  • OFFLINE
  •  

Posted 05 March 2007 - 11:24 AM

Hey all , am looking to having a career in programming after I finish the Computer Science degree I am doing next year and i'm asking to see if any knows what languages I should know to help me get a job. Currently I know VB6, VB.NET, PHP, CSS, HTML, and some ASP, Java and a little bit of Javascript that i've picked up. I am still learning Java and ASP and I was wondering whether I should be learning C/C++ and what else should I be doing to get a headstart in programming when I leave university.
Thanks for any help. Dan

BC AdBot (Login to Remove)

 


m

#2 groovicus

groovicus

  • Security Colleague
  • 9,963 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Centerville, SD

Posted 05 March 2007 - 12:54 PM

I am confused. You are getting a computer science degree, and the highest aspiration that you have for it is programmer? :thumbsup:


Have you been using those skills that you learned for things other than coursework in your time at school? I develop web applications, create custom utilities, run a web server, do research for the university, attend programming contests, etc. If all I got out of my education was a job as a programmer, I would feel that I had wasted 4 years of my life.

Here is an excellent definition of computer science:

The body of knowledge resulting from this discipline contains theories for understanding computing systems and methods; design methodology, algorithms, and tools; methods for the testing of concepts; methods of analysis and verification; and knowledge representation and implementation.


As a programmer (depending on where you end up), you are going to be given a set of specifications and guidelines, and you are going to implement it. Chances are that you won't even have a clue how or where your code fits in to the bigger picture. Chances are also that you are going to have very little leeway in how you implement your code too.

If that is what you want to do, then great, there is nothing wrong with that. A career in programming is a great career, and you already have a solid foundation. Nobody is going to expect you to come out of college with a full grasp of any particular language. What they will expect of you is that you are able to learn which ever language it is that you need. Since college is learning how to learn, that is not an unreasonable expectation.

If you really want to utilize your Comp. Sci. degree, then I would respectfully suggest that you spend the remaining portion of your academic career trying to be a computer scientist. Develop a web application or web page for a local church, charity, or go-cart club; anything to demonstrate that you can take a concept, develop it, and then implement it. It doesn't even have to be pretty, but it will show potential employers that you have tried to implement some of what oyu have learned in school.

Best regards,
groovicus

#3 Guest_danbrownlow_*

Guest_danbrownlow_*

  • Guests
  • OFFLINE
  •  

Posted 05 March 2007 - 04:37 PM

Hey I know what you mean, but i've always either wanted to be a programmer or web designer. I have made web pages for some local bands and also the band I am in like you said. Programming has been one thing i'd love to do.. I mean i'd love to get into games programming. I've made little games like Frogger and Mastermind in VB.net and have made some other little programs. I just wanted some help with what most programming jobs are after if you know what I mean. Thanks for advice anyway. Dan

#4 groovicus

groovicus

  • Security Colleague
  • 9,963 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Centerville, SD
  • Local time:06:15 AM

Posted 05 March 2007 - 05:03 PM

And that is fine. I didn't realize how much I enjoyed programming either. You really do have your bases covered as far as languages though.

EDIT: I am sort of curious though as to why pursue a computer science degree instead of just attending a technical school? Please understand, I am not being critical of your choices; if you want to program and do web-design, great; Your background will still serve you well in those areas, but I think you should have been steered towards graphic design, or other visual arts type classes, with emphasis on web design.

That's just my opinion is all. :thumbsup:

#5 Guest_danbrownlow_*

Guest_danbrownlow_*

  • Guests
  • OFFLINE
  •  

Posted 07 March 2007 - 06:15 AM

Yea' I know what you mean. I know what you mean and thanks for your advice. Thanks. Dan

#6 Roger F. Gay

Roger F. Gay

  • Members
  • 90 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  

Posted 27 March 2007 - 08:31 AM

If you're interested in web technology: AJAX is the big up and coming thing. It's used in advanced web services like Google Mail and Maps. You should learn that. It's the newest standard version of JavaScript. AJAX stands for Asynchronous JavaScript and XML; So, you should get much better at JavaScript, dhtml / xhtml, and XML processing.

Whether you end up using Java, C++, or something else like C# and .NET depends primarily on the organization that hires you. There will probably be enough work with all those languages to get you a job if you're at least good at one.

If you can get a job with Google ... that would be very nice. My guess is that they're going to lead website development for a while.

Edited by Roger F. Gay, 27 March 2007 - 08:32 AM.





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users