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Which Media File Should I Use?


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#1 KNDV46

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Posted 04 March 2007 - 03:36 PM

OK, I'm confused. I have some dvd-r disks containing home movies that I want to put on my cpu for the purpose of making a single, edited disk. I used Nero recode to convert the files to mpeg-4, burned it to disk, and it didn't work. Then I converted the files to mpeg using the Any Video Converter program, which works fine on two computers, but won't play on a standard Toshiba dvd player/tv.

What format do you have to use to play a dvd in a standard dvd player connected to a tv? I want to send the finished disk to elderly relatives who aren't computer savvy, but have dvd players in their living rooms. Which media file is typically used? Any ideas why mpeg won't work on my tv?

Thanks in advance. :thumbsup:

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#2 pip22

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Posted 04 March 2007 - 05:35 PM

The problem may not be related to file format. As long as you are encoding in dvd-video format (mpeg2), there may be another reason why they won't play on some standalone dvd players.

1. Some (usually older) dvd players just won't play any DVD discs other than commercially made ones (the disc recording technology is completely different). This is most likely to apply to dvd players which are older than the home dvd-recording technology we now take for granted.

OR

2. Some dvd recorders will play home-made movie discs, but only if they are the DVD+R type. While some others will only play the DVD-R type. Some can play both, but I think DVD+R is probably compatible with more players compared to DVD-R.

Edited by pip22, 04 March 2007 - 05:40 PM.


#3 HitSquad

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Posted 04 March 2007 - 05:42 PM

Hi KNDV46, welcome to BC. :thumbsup:
For a standard DVD player connected to a television, use the standard dvd file structure. (vob, ifo, bup) that all retail dvd's use. Since you have Nero installed, use NeroVision, which will do the conversion for you.

#4 KNDV46

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Posted 04 March 2007 - 09:34 PM

Thanks guys.

The Toshiba machine I mentioned will play dvd-r disks, so that's not an issue. Are there any pros/cons to the file structures you mentioned, HitSquad (vob, ifo, bup), and what other structures are used in retail dvd's, if any?

Great website, btw. :thumbsup:

#5 HitSquad

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Posted 05 March 2007 - 06:03 AM

That's it KNDV46.
Any movie on dvd you buy or rent uses that file structure. It will play on any dvd player.




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