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Partition Magic Help


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#1 jusalilnukinfutz

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Posted 13 February 2007 - 04:50 PM

I have a 74g HD that runs like a snail! I have been given fantastic support and help from the Hijack this section of this forum. Now, I know my computer is free of any and all bugs. I've done all the necessary maintenance and ran all the little utilities that could free up space and speed things up. My only solultion is partition the drive and move my 1500+ music files to a different storage location. Unfortunately, I cannot spend anymore money on this computer and there is no way for me to backup all my information without doing that. I have Parition Magic 8, haven't even installed it yet, but I read through the readme file. I'm concerned I will make a huge mess of things if I attempt this myself. Can someone please offer assistance??

Thanks so much!

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#2 arcman

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Posted 13 February 2007 - 05:38 PM

Can I ask why you want to partition in the first place?
Partitioning your drive isn't going to give you more space on your C: drive, quite the opposite, you'll need to shrink your existing partition to make room for the new one. Neither will a new partition necessarily give you a "back up" of your data, because although it's true if you have to reformat your C: drive the other partition will be kept safe, if you have a hard drive failure you can still lose all of your data no matter where it's partitioned.

Backing up your data means saving it to two places, preferably in different storage locations.
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#3 fozzie

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Posted 13 February 2007 - 05:41 PM

I did use Gparted Live
and I am a total noob when it comes down to partitions. Easy to use interface, with about every formatting type there is. The best thing it is fee!!!

#4 jusalilnukinfutz

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Posted 13 February 2007 - 08:30 PM

Can I ask why you want to partition in the first place?
Partitioning your drive isn't going to give you more space on your C: drive, quite the opposite, you'll need to shrink your existing partition to make room for the new one. Neither will a new partition necessarily give you a "back up" of your data, because although it's true if you have to reformat your C: drive the other partition will be kept safe, if you have a hard drive failure you can still lose all of your data no matter where it's partitioned.

Backing up your data means saving it to two places, preferably in different storage locations.


Absolutely, I want to partition because I need to store my music in another location. I've been told that the mass amounts of data I'm storing is slowing down my system. So my only alternative is to partition what I have or Buy more RAM and HD... Is this wrong? There is nothing wrong with my comp. at this point, just slow and it's HEALTHY!! :thumbsup:

#5 usasma

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Posted 13 February 2007 - 08:36 PM

Partitioning is a great tool for a specific purpose - that is organizing your drive into specific sections for specific purposes. For example, on my XP system my main drive was a 36 gB drive. On my secondary drive (74 gB) I made a small partition in the beginning for my pagefile - that isolated it from the main drive. Then I used the second partition for data storage.

I discourage the use of Partition Magic and other partitioning utilities unless you've got a really good backup that can't get hosed (I deleted my backup with a partitioning tool not long ago).

I'd suggest reading this post on slow computers: http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/forums/t/44690/slow-computer/
Once that's done, then we can talk about trimming your startups, pruning your services, and generally optimizing your system.
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#6 arcman

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Posted 14 February 2007 - 11:34 PM

Absolutely, I want to partition because I need to store my music in another location. I've been told that the mass amounts of data I'm storing is slowing down my system. So my only alternative is to partition what I have or Buy more RAM and HD... Is this wrong? There is nothing wrong with my comp. at this point, just slow and it's HEALTHY!! :thumbsup:

The amount of data files on your computer isn't going to slow down your OS, unless you've filled up the hard drive to the point where the data files are taking up the room that the virtual memory file would occupy, causing disk thrashing. And by filled up I mean you're getting Windows alerts that you need to free up room on your drive. If that's the case, repartitioning won't help you at all, because even if you divide your hard drive into two portions you're still going to have just as much data taking up the space.
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#7 highphlyer

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Posted 29 August 2007 - 10:54 AM

Dear jusalilnukinfutz,

Did I miss something? I haven't noticed anyone suggesting that you add an external HD. Why not? Prices have been falling rapidly lately -- I just bought a Seagate FreeAgent 500GB USB external drive for $120. Smaller ones are well under $100. I spent an extra $20 for a USB card to install in my computer. You can move all your media files onto the external drive, and still have plenty of room for backups. Also, when you are able to buy a new computer, you can just plug in the external HD into it and be ready to go.

I'm no expert, but this was way too easy for me, an only marginally computer-literate old guy.

highphlyer

#8 WinCrazy

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Posted 29 August 2007 - 12:24 PM

highphlyer - It wasn't mentioned to add another hard drive because it hasn't been determined
1) If the hard drive is too full;
2) Why the system is slow.

Until this is found out it is pointless to add another drive, at least right away.

Also, it is always a good idea to partition a lone hard drive into multiple volumes (partitions). This way all the user's documents, music, video, program installers, etc. can be removed from the partition in which XP exists. Should XP become corrupted and a reinstall (NOT a restore!!!) need to be done then the XP partition can be wiped and XP reloaded without wiping the user's files along with it.

If a restore (NOT a reinstall) is done then the entire disk drive is wiped including all partitions and all data they contain. The only way to preserve the user's files on a hard drive partition is to have previously transfered them to a second hard drive.




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