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What's The Deal With Compiling


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#1 Jombee

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Posted 06 February 2007 - 07:02 PM

Hi everybody,

I like to think I'm fairly computer savvy, broke my first one at age 12, got some network cards and cat3 cable at 14 (stared at expensive paperweights not too long after that) etc.. etc...
you know the type, windows guy, neighborhood tech and all that hoo haa.

I've been trying to work with debian for a while and would like to try my hand at building a system basically from scratch (tried gentoo and that ain't happenin) so I would like to install a basic debian system from the business card iso and compile what I want from there (excluding WM and DE of course that would take all day) but what should be fairly simple programs like qtparted and I think gaim was another need so many darn libs and dev packages it really doesn't seem worth it.

basically what I'm looking for is a nice meta-package or something like that, that I could apt-get or whatever so I could compile pretty much whatever I want without having to track down all of the necessary "support files" for lack of a better term.

if anyone could point me in the right direction, that would be pretty cool.

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#2 Joedude

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Posted 07 February 2007 - 06:29 AM

have you browsed here yet?

http://www.us.debian.org/distrib/packages

if so, then maybe you missed this:

http://packages.debian.org/cgi-bin/search_...amp;release=all

It really makes life easier.

Edited by Joedude, 07 February 2007 - 06:34 AM.

If someone tells you to su rm -rf /
DON'T DO IT!!!!
Be in the know, Bash smart!

#3 Jombee

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Posted 07 February 2007 - 09:55 AM

packages are fine, I can apt-get just about anything I need either from the direct sources or by adding to sources.list from apt-get.org.
it's when I try to compile that I get a constant stream of unfulfilled requirements.

it's not really a big deal, I'm probably going to end up playing around with another distro in the not too distant future

#4 Joedude

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Posted 09 February 2007 - 05:16 AM

all a package manager does really is compile for you. A properly set up package will have all of the dependencies resloved in it. A poor packagewon't, but a good package manager will identify that and ask you if you want to install the dependant package.

As far as compiling goes, then you have to research the program and see what dependencies it requires, then make sure you have them all ready. If not, then you have to put them in as well.

Like you said, no big deal, it can just be a pain sometimes.
If someone tells you to su rm -rf /
DON'T DO IT!!!!
Be in the know, Bash smart!

#5 Jombee

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Posted 09 February 2007 - 07:52 AM

I was under the impression that compiled programs are more fine tuned for the system they're compiled on, so that would make them run faster.
example:
I have a program.deb and also the source for the same program.
dpkg -i program.deb installs it fine, but if I were to compile the same program it would run faster... am I correct???
if not why bother with systems like gentoo or any of the other "from source" distros?

-Tom

#6 Joedude

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Posted 09 February 2007 - 10:41 AM

You are correct. Compiling from source allows the binary package to take advantage of the systems hardware and use optimized deffinitions and flags.

Where, A .deb (or any other for that matter) is all ready been compiled to a set of generic, or default values. Sometimes even on another machine with different values (Google building your own packages), and then distributing them, as can be the case from a non-official repor site amnytimes.

As far as faster. True it is. But the average program isn't big enough to take advantage of that speed. Huge, graphix rendering programs would show substantial improvement, but, let's say solitaire, wouldn't. Many argue compiling from source is more stable as well. This I honestly don't know. But, it would seem to make sense.
If someone tells you to su rm -rf /
DON'T DO IT!!!!
Be in the know, Bash smart!

#7 Jombee

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Posted 09 February 2007 - 12:16 PM

thanks, I think it's a little cleared up for me.
one exception. when there is no precompiled package for my system, I have to compile whatever it is that I want to install. qtparted on debian sarge is what origionally made me post this thread.
I had every lib and dev package I could find in synaptic, and when I go to compile it needs more libs, so I download those, then it needs more until finally I decide I don't really need qtparted that bad.

#8 Joedude

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Posted 09 February 2007 - 05:51 PM

to be fair, it is a bit more complicated than that...but, if your understanding stays there, you won't do bad. I may be getting ready to sswitch all the way back to debian, due to some...proprietary issues, with Ubuntu and Linspire anyway.
If someone tells you to su rm -rf /
DON'T DO IT!!!!
Be in the know, Bash smart!

#9 Jombee

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Posted 09 February 2007 - 11:16 PM

I've been off and on with linux for a while, I just haven't found a distro that "fits".
I guess I'm the worst type of convert, I have the microsoft method so ingrained in me that it's hard to think outside the window. I'm getting it, it's just taking longer than it should for me to figure it out.

[Edit]
I've found a way out of dependency hell and it's called Sabayon, based on Gentoo which I thought I would never use again. It's only been a few hours but I'm impressed.

Edited by Jombee, 10 February 2007 - 07:46 PM.


#10 Joedude

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Posted 11 February 2007 - 04:23 AM

Actually, if you insist compiling from source...I'm kinda surprised you don't prefer Gentoo. If you want to be forced to learn linux, use a slackware or slackware based distro. If you're really that stuck to windows, then Ubuntu or Mandriva (or whatever they are calling it this week) is probably for you. I know a lot of people who have used Fedora since it was simply red hat and they swear by it. There's a flavor out there for you somewhere. Don't give up. Debian happens to be my favorite. I can put it on damn near any machine, I can customize it exactl as I want it, and for me, it runs without any major hiccups or over-complications.
If someone tells you to su rm -rf /
DON'T DO IT!!!!
Be in the know, Bash smart!

#11 Jombee

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Posted 13 February 2007 - 08:03 AM

what really turned me off gentoo was this.
I was using a P233, w/92MB of ram trying to install from stage 1.
3 days to install the kernel. another couple of days to install iceWM.
At first I really took a shine to fedora (core3) but since core 4 came out, I just don't like it. I usually end up back with a debian system, but I'm always on the lookout for something a little different.




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