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#1 dabombtom

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Posted 02 January 2005 - 07:01 AM

NOTE: THIS IS FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY AND NOT DESIGNED TO TEACH YOU HOW TO ACCESS RESOURCES IN AN ILLEGAL WAY


Useful info: Ctrl+C beaks from a command.

Hundreds of people seem to ask me how to "hack".

Answer, sod off, i cant! But there are plenty of ways to gain information about a computer using some tools, and information that im going to share.

Firstly we need an IP for most of this, so to get an IP go to command prompt (start->run->cmd) and type

tracert [domain]

such as tracert google.com; However the lack of security im going to focus on is on your local LAN, as once you get into a WAN (internet) there are routers, firewalls, packet filtering etc. and your chances are delimeted!

Firstly, we need to find out whos on our network, so we use a Network Scanner (easy huh). Get one from here, it doesnt need installing, so i reccommend you do file..save as and save it somewhere before you go any further.

http://www.softperfect.com/download/netscan.exe (625kB)


Now we've found whos on our network lets see what we can.

Why don't we see what accounts are open for us to access, and what they have shared; to do this we use a command called nbtstat

The syntax for nbtstat is

nbtstat -a [ip]

Again, open command prompt (start->run->cmd) and type nbtstat -a [ip] e.g. nbtstat -a 192.168.0.2

This will show you something like follows

Wireless Network Connection:
Node IpAddress: [192.168.0.2] Scope Id: []

           NetBIOS Remote Machine Name Table

       Name               Type         Status
    ---------------------------------------------
    TOM            <00>  UNIQUE      Registered
    MSHOME         <00>  GROUP       Registered
    TOM            <20>  UNIQUE      Registered
    TOM            <03>  UNIQUE      Registered
    TOM$           <03>  UNIQUE      Registered
    ADMINISTRATOR  <03>  UNIQUE      Registered

    MAC Address = 00-09-5B-94-7A-A5



The next command for viewing shared information is net view

net view [ip]

In my example, the computer is secured so it returns

There are no entries in the list.


Your may yield some results

Now we've seen whats shared, lets use it.

start->run->

\\[ip]\ such as \\192.168.0.2\

and you should see the shared files.

If we want to access C drive we need to set our computer up to allow use of it.

The default administrative share in Windows, is that the local drives are shared as [drive name]$ to hide them for network browsing. Unless they are forcibly removed these shares always excist such as C$. Pretty nifty huh!

open command prompt and type net use \\[ip]\c$

now in our explorer window we can go to \\[ip]\c$ and we should be in!

I hope you learn something from this, there may be typos but i've written it in a few minutes so their expected!

Another tool you may want to use is GetAdmin, this upgrades your account to an administrator.

http://homepages.nildram.co.uk/~78gfd/admin

On that site are instructions for how to get it, you dont download a file because some places stop you downloading, but instead put the machine code into a new file and rename it. works a treat.

Another trick is for remote hacking we need to find open shares.

To do this i find the most effective technique as follows

1) go to www.whatismyip.com to get your own ip
2) in net scanner set the range to your ip, but the last block 0-255 e.g. 1.2.3.0 to 1.2.3.255
3) look for any computers that have shared folders
4) open that folder in windows
5) with that ip go to \\[ip]\c$ and there is a high chance you will have access to their C drive and all data.

Cracking passwords to http/ftp:

This involves using a program to either brute force, dictionary or list attack a form.
A program that does this is Brutus, however im not providing links.


There are many ways to hack/crack/gain access to a resource, just work out the flaw.

If a website uses SQL then you may be able to use SQL Injection, its a prevelant technique for stealing data such as emails, passwords etc.
http://www.securiteam.com/securityreviews/5DP0N1P76E.html

If a website uses a forum, (such as IPB) then there are known exploits for it that utilises cross site scripting to allow illegitimate access.

The answer to most questions is google, but someone who knows security in and out is also a useful asset. Dont ask me, im only 16!


Tom

Edited by dabombtom, 02 January 2005 - 07:21 AM.


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#2 Zer0_II

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Posted 02 January 2005 - 12:00 PM

Using a brute forcing program such as Brutus doesn't make you a hacker. It makes you a script kiddie. It doesn't require a vast amount of skill to download a program, and then use it to crack a password. If you are interested in real hacking I would suggest for you to learn encryption/decryption algorithms and techniques for this purpose. A real hacker would also report any vulnerabilities that they found to the system administrator so that they can learn from the vulnerability and fix it. That is one of the major differences between a hacker, and a script kiddie or cracker.

#3 cowsgonemadd3

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Posted 02 January 2005 - 01:17 PM

Just wow!

#4 dabombtom

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Posted 02 January 2005 - 02:49 PM

Using a brute forcing program such as Brutus doesn't make you a hacker.


I hope that isnt directed at me, I clearly stated im not, just sharing a few common flaws to help you secure your system (although i didn't state ways to secure them, maybe another time!)

#5 phawgg

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Posted 02 January 2005 - 04:14 PM

Tom, at 16 you are already on the way to helping the Internet that at 51 I'm hopeful will be a better place to be than it has tended to become. I really do hope your generation can solve some of the problems mine has presented you.

That's the way it always is.

Good things have been given to you, but you have to accept the responsibility for the price paid in doing that.

I was born when the war in Korea was goin' on.

It came on the heels of the world war that was supposed to end such madness.

It didn't. Human nature is what it is.

Thank you for your interest in helping us to secure our machines against
the techniques of crackers. We are concerned about it.
Knowledge of how it is done helps.

Keep up your studies, kid.
You're good. :thumbsup:
patiently patrolling, plenty of persisant pests n' problems ...

#6 dabombtom

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Posted 02 January 2005 - 04:46 PM

The main thing that people forget to do when setting up a fresh install of windows is disable any un-necessary services.

Those such as Alerter, Messenger, Remote Registry, Remote Access Auto Connection Manager, Telnet etc. etc.

The small things i showed you here are just basic ways that demonstrate how security default settings are the worst thing you can do.

Evern worse it to leave your network on default, the house over the road from me has their wireless network on all default, and at a guess the password was "password"!

Even on WAN its easy enough to gain access to a system through default setting info.

Use a net scanner and scan a net block for any open port 80's, check them out and a few will be routers. Find the model of the router, find the router's website and find out what the default password is. Shove it in and there is a high chance that you will be able to control, shut down, and generally mess about with their internet access. Also you could forward certain ports to IP's on the network to gain access to files/folders which may contain confidential information.

The best way to test your security is to get your friend to try and get in, if it takes them an hour and they haven't even got a ping response then you know something must be going right.

Any fool can buy a decent firewall, but it takes skill to set one up securely, just like any system/network/machine.

#7 phawgg

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Posted 02 January 2005 - 04:54 PM

The main thing that people forget to do when setting up a fresh install of windows is disable any un-necessary services.

Those such as Alerter, Messenger, Remote Registry, Remote Access Auto Connection Manager, Telnet etc. etc.


I absolutely agree, tom.

I recommend in my signature a place to go for educational purposes when confronting that issue.

Good point, Tom. :thumbsup:
patiently patrolling, plenty of persisant pests n' problems ...

#8 dabombtom

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Posted 02 January 2005 - 05:24 PM

I recommend in my signature a place to go for educational purposes when confronting that issue.


Would that be Black Viper's Services?

I have heard good reviews about it, however i tend to just try it and see what happens, after some deliberation and seeing what works best i've settled upon my services list to allow me use of everything i need whilst keeping security to the highest assertainable level.

I could talk all day about easy ways to compromise a system from people's un-willingness to interact with their settings in case they break them and have to call the computer repair man out costing $200 an hour.

#9 phawgg

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Posted 02 January 2005 - 05:31 PM

Yes, that would be Black Viper's site. I think it will require that a user learn about the subject we both are on... securely configuring your computer based upon exactly how you intend to use it.

I use one computer.
I sometimes have a couple more that I could make a home network out of.
I sometimes use graphic intensive games.
I sometimes spend a lot of time online chasing down bad sites & confirming bad downloads.
Sometimes I'm offline scanning data & listening to mp3"s.

It all depends on knowledge of the subject what is best to do with services
and although it will require some thought on the part of the user,
I tend to be complimentary of Black Viper's thorough analysis of not only winXP and the variety of updates, but the other versions, also. :thumbsup:
patiently patrolling, plenty of persisant pests n' problems ...

#10 dabombtom

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Posted 02 January 2005 - 05:53 PM

A big problem with newer users is fear.

Unless its presented in a Wizard with 3 easy steps, people will be uneasy about doing it.

I can't remember if Black Viper did it, or someone else, made a program that had profiles for different types of users.

Network user/Gamer/Internet Browser etc.

These are fine, however what if i want fast performance in games, and im connected to a domain? What box do i check then.

That's when you just need to find out what every service does, and make an informed decision as to wether its needed or not and the best way to tackle it.

When you say
"I sometimes spend a lot of time online chasing down bad sites & confirming bad downloads."

what exactly do you mean by this? Checking random peoples hyperlinks for errors? Reporting warez sites?

If i were to sum up my computer usage it would be this

I use one computer
I have 2 other users on my home (wireless) network to share my ADSL connection
I often do intensive gaming
I often do intensive video editing
I often do intensive image editing
I often do coding (generally Delphi or PHP)
I often do audio editing
I often mess about with my system settings and wonder what if

I hope my motherboard turns up soon so I can build my new AMD64 based computer that was meant to be up for christmas!

#11 phawgg

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Posted 02 January 2005 - 06:15 PM

I can't remember if Black Viper did it, or someone else, made a program that had profiles for different types of users.

yup, that's Black Viper's fingerprinted style.

That's when you just need to find out what every service does, and make an informed decision as to wether its needed or not and the best way to tackle it.

That is the reason for the three links to Microsoft. :thumbsup:

I hope my motherboard turns up soon so I can build my new AMD64 based computer that was meant to be up for christmas!

I do too, for your educational & other's sake. My old MSI K7N2G will be replaced with probably the very board you mention, BTW.

A big problem with newer users is fear.

You are correct. :flowers:
patiently patrolling, plenty of persisant pests n' problems ...




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