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Router Security


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9 replies to this topic

#1 discokid

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Posted 09 January 2007 - 10:44 PM

I live in an apartment with my brother. We have a cable internet connection and a router. I am just curious as to how much security or even exactly "What security does a router provide from outside the home"?
Does it act as a 'hardware firewall' of sorts?

Thanks.

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#2 fozzie

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Posted 09 January 2007 - 10:46 PM

which type of router do you have? Brand and type no. please

#3 resp

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Posted 10 January 2007 - 01:18 AM

Aside from giving the above guy the info you need. Ill give you a little background on the general router

by putting your internet connection behind a router, you basically put one more thing a hacker has to go through in your weaponry, Think of it this way, If you're plugged in directly into the wall, the only thing keeping That guy out of your system is the firewall (or lack there of) that you have,

if you put a router in there, Its basically another (more complex) firewall that'll keep most people out, because if they dont' have anything on your end, such as a backdoor trojan etc.. they have to not only go through any firewall you have (or 2). installed, they have to crack the firewall on your router *if it has one* and they also have to crack through the router itself, Which Im pretty sure has 128 bit encryption, not entirely sure, but Im fairely sure that they have something like that So essentially having a router is basically a foolproof way of keeping peopel out, So long as you don't hack up any viruses or anything,


IT doesn't offer perfect protection, but it offers a pain in the ass most people won't bother with, unless they're forced to, Meaning unless you have something they REALLY want,

keep your computer clean of viruses, Spyware etc, anything that can dial home, And you're set, Because there isn't many guys out there who like to deal with routers, that I know of..lol...

If its a wireless one, You're risking a lot by using it, because if you use the wireless portion, then you can very eaisly get your internet connection jacked by some guy next door, ANd from what I understand its not that hard at all to do, just a warning...

#4 nforce

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Posted 10 January 2007 - 02:09 AM

Yes, in most routers, they have the built in firewall that blocks viruses and stuff, but most of the protection from preventing 'leeches' (people that use your internet) is the encryption key. If you don't have any protection, anyone can use your internet and be on your network (and can sometimes do bad things to it). A common form of protection is a WEP encryption key, but with the right tools, this can be cracked.

The best way to have it would be to have a WAP encryption (so far uncrackable i think) and to have all the firewalls on as well as good virus protection on your computer.

WAP is not compatible with all wireless devices though.

#5 micaman

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Posted 10 January 2007 - 03:43 AM

If you want to be REALLY SECURE, you will want to employ MAC Address Filtering. This will stop ALL users on your network unless you add their machine's MAC address to your router/firewall settings.

Just my little two bits... :thumbsup:

#6 usasma

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Posted 10 January 2007 - 12:29 PM

Wireless is inherently less secure than wired. You can take steps to secure the wireless - that'll be described in the product's manual.

Generally all routers have a hardware firewall - it's just a dumb critter that blocks stuff from certain ports. While it is better than no firewall, there are other, free solutions available to help make it more secure.

Regardless of the security that you setup, the safest thing to do is to turn it off or unplug the cable when you're not using it. Yes, it's a PITA to boot the router and then boot your PC - but there's generally no way for a hacker to gain access to a router that's turned off/unplugged.

NOTE: This is a "do as I say, not as I do" sorta thing. I leave mine on and connected all the time. The difference is that I periodically monitor my connections for threats based on the activity of the modem and router (they sit next to my monitor on my desk).

Edited by usasma, 10 January 2007 - 12:30 PM.

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#7 discokid

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Posted 12 January 2007 - 06:39 PM

Thank you all for your replies.

To the fozzie, it's a D-link... G-Router... ummm something. It's not a wireless router so I have no worries as far as that goes.

To resp, Thanks for the informative, layman's reply. I understand. I scan weekly for spyware/malware and I use Avast... (comments?). I dump cookies/cache/history daily. I really don't have anything financial on my computer except invoices, but there are NO credit card numbers, bank cards or cheques there. I don't even do my banking online. The invoices are just so I can print out what's owed to me.

But overall, I have just a windows XP firewall, my antivirus and my router for protection. I think it's good enough and the only reason I have a router is to share my connection with my brother. And I asked the question because my customers often ask me about PC security and routers. Since I don't deal with routers, just the actual cable modem connection - I just wasn't sure.

Thanks All - ;)

Sean - discokid


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#8 discokid

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Posted 12 January 2007 - 06:42 PM

If you want to be REALLY SECURE, you will want to employ MAC Address Filtering. This will stop ALL users on your network unless you add their machine's MAC address to your router/firewall settings.

Just my little two bits... :thumbsup:


How do I find out the mac addresses of the 2 computers? I should be able to add those into the router interface somewhere right? What is that again? 168.0.0.1?

Cheers -

Discokid

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#9 discokid

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Posted 12 January 2007 - 07:03 PM

Yes, in most routers, they have the built in firewall that blocks viruses and stuff, but most of the protection from preventing 'leeches' (people that use your internet) is the encryption key. If you don't have any protection, anyone can use your internet and be on your network (and can sometimes do bad things to it). A common form of protection is a WEP encryption key, but with the right tools, this can be cracked.

The best way to have it would be to have a WAP encryption (so far uncrackable i think) and to have all the firewalls on as well as good virus protection on your computer.

WAP is not compatible with all wireless devices though.


Is an encryption key something for wireless only?

#10 DJBPace07

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Posted 13 January 2007 - 02:00 AM

Be careful with MAC address filtering. I used it for a while and the wireless adapters had trouble with it, constant disconnects. I turned it off and kept the encryption, masked the SSID, and restricted the number of wireless users it will accept to two. That solved the problems, but my drivers for the adapters are junk and I'm keeping my fingers crossed that Netgear will update them soon.

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