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Hard-drive


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#1 Jesse Bassett

Jesse Bassett

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Posted 05 January 2007 - 05:52 PM

Hello,
I have an Inspiron 6000 and have done a lot of uninstalling and reinstalling of Windows and Linux in the past year. I am a beta tester and some of the programs messed my laptop up, causing me to be forced to reinstall Windows. What I am wondering is this:

1.) How can I tell if I need a new hard-drive on my PC?

2.) How can I remove the crap from the old operating systems?

Help me please,
Jess
Windows XP Media Center Edition 2005 l McAfee Total Protection l Super AntiSpyware Free Edition l AdAware SE Personal l Spyware Blaster l Spyware Guard l Safe Eyes 2007

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#2 arcman

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Posted 05 January 2007 - 06:21 PM

Normally you only need to replace a hard drive if it's failing. A drive diagnostic will tell you pretty definitively if that's the case. Drive Fitness Test is a good tool for that.
http://www.hitachigst.com/hdd/support/download.htm#DFT

Usually simple repartitioning and reformat is all you need to remove the previous data from old OSes, if you need more than that there are tools that will fill the drive's data sectors with zeros, in the case that Linux leaves behind strange partitions or boot sectors that a Windows setup won't recognize. I usually use something like Darik's Boot and Nuke.
http://dban.sourceforge.net/
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