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Swap File Re---ram Usage.....


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#1 1Bart

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Posted 18 December 2006 - 09:18 AM

Hello and Happy Holidays!!!!

Is the Swap File what is used to "borrow" ram from the "storage" memory? i. e. Accessing the "Virtual Memory"

If so, then in Task Mgr., if the available never goes to zero, is the Swap File never being used and your virtual memory not being utilized?

If a computer was "born" with 512MB and 1GB was added.....Once the "available" goes below 1GB, are you using the purchased memory and therefore not driving the swap file crazy which you would have been doing if the additional 1GB had not been purchased?

Hope this makes some sense as obviously I do not know what is actually going on.

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#2 usasma

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Posted 18 December 2006 - 09:44 AM

The answer is yes....and no.

First, the computer will generally prefer the RAM over the swap file. Some of the names for it are Pagefile, SwapFile, Virtual Memory, and pagefile.sys. It's actually stored in the pagefile.sys on the root (C:\ in most cases) of your hard drive.

But, there are some processes and programs that require the pagefile. Usually they do this to load less essential tasks into the pagefile - which will then free up RAM for the more intensive things that they consider necessary.

Try this link for more info: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Virtual_memory
The introduction is a bit confusing, so skip down to the section headed "Background".
My browser caused a flood of traffic, sio my IP address was banned. Hope to fix it soon. Will get back to posting as soon as Im able.

- John  (my website: http://www.carrona.org/ )**If you need a more detailed explanation, please ask for it. I have the Knack. **  If I haven't replied in 48 hours, please send me a message. My eye problems have recently increased and I'm having difficult reading posts. (23 Nov 2017)FYI - I am completely blind in the right eye and ~30% blind in the left eye.<p>If the eye problems get worse suddenly, I may not be able to respond.If that's the case and help is needed, please PM a staff member for assistance.

#3 1Bart

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Posted 18 December 2006 - 10:12 AM

Hello and Happy Holidays to All!!!

Good article..a bit "heavy" for my knowledge base. BUT...good info nonetheless.

A lot is in the hands of the Programmer (Background paragraph). Defragging helps but adding RAM helps far better(Fragmentaton of Windows PageFile paragraph)...We should already know that.

Apparently many hands are in THIS pot of soup.......

#4 usasma

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Posted 19 December 2006 - 12:09 AM

Yep, the pagefile quagmire is something that I try to stay away from - too many variables!

FWIW - I like VoptXP for defragging the pagefile in XP.
My browser caused a flood of traffic, sio my IP address was banned. Hope to fix it soon. Will get back to posting as soon as Im able.

- John  (my website: http://www.carrona.org/ )**If you need a more detailed explanation, please ask for it. I have the Knack. **  If I haven't replied in 48 hours, please send me a message. My eye problems have recently increased and I'm having difficult reading posts. (23 Nov 2017)FYI - I am completely blind in the right eye and ~30% blind in the left eye.<p>If the eye problems get worse suddenly, I may not be able to respond.If that's the case and help is needed, please PM a staff member for assistance.

#5 1Bart

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Posted 19 December 2006 - 04:26 AM

Hello Mr. USAMSA!!

I have WinXP and use the defragger that came with it. You state that you defrag the "pagefile" with VoptXP. Am I also defragging the "pagefile" or is there only one way to defrag?

In my limited knowledge, I wouldn't know the difference. I have heard that many use another defraggers due to speed but as I do it often enough (the last time, less than 30min) I wouldn't want to rock this boat anymore than necessary....

#6 usasma

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Posted 19 December 2006 - 08:44 AM

You can't defrag the pagefile while it's in use - and when Windows is running, it's being used. So it'll take another program to do this - one that runs at boot.

Now, there's a lot of discussion that's been had about the need for this. I, personally, don't experience any great performance increases when doing it. Also, you can "defrag" the pagefile yourself (without a program) by disabling it (setting it to 0), rebooting, set it back to it's original size and reboot again.

This removes the pagefile, then recreates it - so it's unfragmented to start with.
My browser caused a flood of traffic, sio my IP address was banned. Hope to fix it soon. Will get back to posting as soon as Im able.

- John  (my website: http://www.carrona.org/ )**If you need a more detailed explanation, please ask for it. I have the Knack. **  If I haven't replied in 48 hours, please send me a message. My eye problems have recently increased and I'm having difficult reading posts. (23 Nov 2017)FYI - I am completely blind in the right eye and ~30% blind in the left eye.<p>If the eye problems get worse suddenly, I may not be able to respond.If that's the case and help is needed, please PM a staff member for assistance.

#7 1Bart

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Posted 19 December 2006 - 09:04 AM

Hello Mr. USASMA,

Ahhh, the tweaks and tricks of the trade.......

Would the same (defragging the pagefile) be accomplished if you defragged in "Safe Mode"....?

#8 mommabear

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Posted 19 December 2006 - 03:05 PM

Then there's this:

PageDefrag v2.32
By Mark Russinovich and Bryce Cogswell
Published: November 1, 2006
Introduction

One of the limitations of the Windows NT/2000 defragmentation interface is that it is not possible to defragment files that are open for exclusive access. Thus, standard defragmentation programs can neither show you how fragmented your paging files or Registry hives are, nor defragment them. Paging and Registry file fragmentation can be one of the leading causes of performance degradation related to file fragmentation in a system.

PageDefrag uses advanced techniques to provide you what commercial defragmenters cannot: the ability for you to see how fragmented your paging files and Registry hives are, and to defragment them. In addition, it defragments event log files and Windows 2000/XP hibernation files (where system memory is saved when you hibernate a laptop).

PageDefrag works on Windows NT 4.0, Windows 2000, Windows XP, and Server 2003.

http://www.microsoft.com/technet/sysintern...PageDefrag.mspx


I tried it once. Took about 30 minutes on my computer. Seemed to do no harm.

#9 1Bart

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Posted 19 December 2006 - 08:56 PM

Thanks mommabear!!!

Will certainly put THAT Howitzer in the arsenal.....And use it after I come to grips with this whole darned thing.....

TY




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