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Searching Drive (linux Vs. Winxp)


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#1 tristanolas

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Posted 17 December 2006 - 08:12 PM

I'm trying to use the comand prompt XP to do really simple file management tasks. Options seem very limited. I can't even find info on searching a drive for a folder. I also am unable to search for only the last 2 text folders created on C:\ drive

is linux pretty similar to windows XP command line in this way, or does it allow more freedom & simplicity?

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#2 silmaril8n

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Posted 18 December 2006 - 02:56 AM

If the command line is where you feel comfortable then Linux will soar for you.

A simple two step process will find anything you want:

sudo updatedb
slocate %term%



#3 groovicus

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Posted 18 December 2006 - 02:27 PM

This is not really a Linux question per se, but there are several ways of using the command line in Windows to accomplish what you want. One way is to use ATTRIB to find a particular folder.
EXAMPLE:
attrib c:\command.com /s
This will find the command.com file in every directory on drive C and display the attributes.

NOTE: When using DIR or ATTRIB, you must specify that the search start at the root path in order to search the entire drive, or you can specify a pathname if you want to restrict the search to a certain branch of the directory tree.

Of course, there is the FIND command, as well as QGREP. Windows has many equally usable command line tools, so it is a matter of learning to understand the help each of the tools provides. Linux is not going to give you any more freedom or flexibility until one learns the tools.

#4 nlinecomputers

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Posted 18 December 2006 - 03:07 PM

Linux has a very powerful filtering tool called grep. You can pipe any output through grep and let it filter as needed.
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#5 tristanolas

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Posted 18 December 2006 - 08:13 PM

Of course, there is the FIND command, as well as QGREP. Windows has many equally usable command line tools, so it is a matter of learning to understand the help each of the tools provides. Linux is not going to give you any more freedom or flexibility until one learns the tools.

thanks, I'd overlooked the find command. for the QGREP command I need Windows Server 2003 Resource Kit Tools, but I'm on XP.

since this is becoming more of a windows than unix topic, I posted remaining questions
on the XP forum

Edited by tristanolas, 18 December 2006 - 09:02 PM.


#6 groovicus

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Posted 18 December 2006 - 09:20 PM

QGrep can be downloaded as part of the resource toolkit:
http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details...;DisplayLang=en

:thumbsup:




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