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#1 unloaded

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Posted 16 December 2006 - 07:14 AM

I understand the fact that most p2p applications are used for illegal purposes, however I don't see where the sources are from, there's got to be someone who is buying the actual thing such as music albums in order to provide the songs.

Does anyone know who is nice enough to buy software or music and share them for free on p2p applications?

thanks.

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#2 Walkman

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Posted 16 December 2006 - 08:09 AM

I understand the fact that most p2p applications are used for illegal purposes, however I don't see where the sources are from, there's got to be someone who is buying the actual thing such as music albums in order to provide the songs.

Well, what do you mean by illegal purposes? If you bought a metal detector and went out and found coins, gold and other precious metals, don't you think that someone has payed for those items, but lost them? Wouldn't, and shouldn't that be considered using metal detectors for illegal purposes? You know you're suppose to turn it in to your local authorities........ so they can either keep it or sell it off (for profit).

But, any software can and is used for illegal purposes. And I mean any. That's why p2p programs got such a bad rep. Because it's the most sought after way to download anything digital. And I mean anything. P2p, is no different than actual ftp, sorta speak. If they outlawed p2p altogether, then we'll all know that just the regular right mouse click will soon become illegal.

There is nothing illegal about p2p, and I fully support it. No questions at all from me.

They sell guns all the time in stores (which is used to kill) but the stores aren't held responsible for illegal content. This whole new New World Order is full of &*%$$&.

Does anyone know who is nice enough to buy software or music and share them for free on p2p applications?

I can mention millions of them. These people use their hard-earned money from their regular jobs, and simply buy things they want, but they make it available to others. Why they do it?... why don't you just email them and ask them? Don't ask others. Ask the one's that are providing the content... "Why do you do it?", and watch their responses. It's NOT about the money.

I'm going to assume you use torrent clients... ok?......... when you download from most of them, in their .nfo file, they specifically advise you that "if you like this game/program/movie/ or whatever...... go and buy it and support the company. Those are the people who are nice enough to do that. The one's that provide the torrents from THEIR hard-earned cash.

DO NOT underestimate the providers of torrents for you. Get to know them, and you'll soon see that this is a two-sided avenue. It's NOT what most people think. You didn't pay for it, you can't download it..... yeah right. Imagine that.

#3 fozzie

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Posted 16 December 2006 - 08:43 AM

A peer-to-peer (or P2P) computer network is a network that relies primarily on the computing power and bandwidth of the participants in the network rather than concentrating it in a relatively low number of servers. P2P networks are typically used for connecting nodes via largely ad hoc connections. Such networks are useful for many purposes. Sharing content files (see file sharing) containing audio, video, data or anything in digital format is very common, and realtime data, such as telephony traffic, is also passed using P2P technology.

A pure peer-to-peer network does not have the notion of clients or servers, but only equal peer nodes that simultaneously function as both "clients" and "servers" to the other nodes on the network. This model of network arrangement differs from the client-server model where communication is usually to and from a central server. A typical example for a non peer-to-peer file transfer is an FTP server where the client and server programs are quite distinct, and the clients initiate the download/uploads and the servers react to and satisfy these requests.

The earliest peer-to-peer network in widespread use was the Usenet news server system, in which peers communicated with one another in order to propagate Usenet news articles over the entire Usenet network. Particularly in the earlier days of Usenet, UUCP was used to extend even beyond the Internet. However, the news server system also acted in a client-server form when individual users accessed a local news server in order to read and post articles.

Some networks and channels, such as Napster, OpenNAP, or IRC @find, use a client-server structure for some tasks (e.g., searching) and a peer-to-peer structure for others. Networks such as Gnutella or Freenet use a peer-to-peer structure for all purposes, and are sometimes referred to as true peer-to-peer networks, although Gnutella is greatly facilitated by directory servers that inform peers of the network addresses of other peers.

Peer-to-peer architecture embodies one of the key technical concepts of the internet, described in the first internet Request for Comments, "RFC 1, Host Software" [1] dated 7 April 1969. More recently, the concept has achieved recognition in the general public in the context of the absence of central indexing servers in architectures used for exchanging multimedia files.

The concept of peer to peer is increasingly evolving to an expanded usage as the relational dynamic active in distributed networks, i.e. not just computer to computer, but human to human. Yochai Benkler has developed the notion of commons-based peer production to denote collaborative projects such as free software. Associated with peer production are the concept of peer governance (referring to the manner in which peer production projects are managed) and peer property (referring to the new type of licenses which recognize individual authorship but not exclusive property rights, such as the GNU General Public License and the Creative Commons License).



http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peer-to-peer

At BC it strongly recommended to stay away from P2P of any kind since a lot of bogus files with malware in it is floating around the networks. There are stories from record companies who uploaded files containing worms into to the network. Especially on easy accessable networks such as limewire you will see a lot of ....

Edited by jgweed, 16 December 2006 - 09:51 AM.


#4 yano

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Posted 29 December 2006 - 02:26 AM

Peer to Peer networking is actually one of the best things to ever sweep the internet. If it wasn't for BitTorrent and other P2P programs, many legit software (ie: OpenOffice.org and countless distributions of Linux) wouldn't be possible.

BitTorrent and P2P allow companies to give away there free product or paid product (where you need to authenticate yourself on their tracker), without wasting there bandwidth. BitTorrent actually helps prevent the Internet wires between continents from becoming completely congested.

#5 Walkman

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Posted 29 December 2006 - 04:49 AM

To answer the thread, Bram Cohen is behind the p2p client. The creator/developer of it.

To fozzie,
No offense, but I think you're using frozen text that is just compiled from whatever sources to make people feel that to use a p2p program to download, you're committing a piracy crime. P2P is 100% legal. It's how you use it that makes it illegal or not.

I'll never openly nor voluntarily speak of doing any illegal activity, especially in open forums. But there is NOTHING illegal about p2p. People may do illegal things with it, but p2p is NOT illegal.

Question no# 1. Can you show everyone reading this as to how so many legitimate companies are distributing their software by p2p, and not in any DRM/RIAA/MPAA trouble? Easy....... p2p is NOT illegal.

If Microsoft decides to offer everything they have in .torrent format, will you download from them or will you say that it's p2p'ing?...... I'll answer it for you. You'll download it no matter what is said about it, because you feel like you're downloading from a reputable source. It's no different from any other source. You know what you want to download, and you know what you're downloading.

I know how easy it is for you isp to spy on you. That's why there is protection out there. And if you say "your isp can monitor everything, and knows everything you're doing, then you should consider learning networking. Your isp can't monitor your every move, if you know how to protect yourself.

But fozzie, it's all good.

P2p isn't bad at all. It's what you make of it. It's what you do with it.

When it comes to p2p, I'm in, because I have better protection than the traditional way of downloading (ftp,http).

#6 fozzie

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Posted 29 December 2006 - 07:31 AM

Walkman, none taken.. This text was taken from wikipedia an open source library. In principle I do agree that P2P file sharing is not bad if the license holders are the initiators, like you said if Microsoft decides to distribute their software through this system no problem.

Quite often, and you could agree with me on that, the files shared in those networks are copyright protected varying from programs upto complete dvd's, cd's. Copyright holders recenty have decided to post bogus files , some of them with malware in it, to demotivate parties.

If you do a walkaround on websites giving assistence with malware problems you will see that a lot will originate from downloading "misappropiated content " or even worse they have downloaded cracks or serial generators which will infect your computer.

If members decide to go along and keep on participating in these activities fine with me. The only issue at stake here is what are the consequences?

#7 Walkman

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Posted 29 December 2006 - 01:37 PM

To fozzie,

I agree with you on that 100%.

But I see that the main problem is that people are using IE in the first place. That browser alone will get you infected. And that's without downloading anything. It's from simply using it, and going to web sites that may be infected. But IE provides no protection for your browsing needs. That's the main problem.

And if I was a HJT helper, my condition on helping anyone would be that they use Firefox when the job is complete. That's how they can pay back to this community.

Then you have those out there that download without any virus protection software, no ip blocking software, no firewalls, nothing. They just download and they're happy with just that. Then... it hits them, right where it hurts, but now..... the damage is done.

Ohhhh, believe me,,, I look at the HJT posts all the time. I just saw one where someone says that they're infected again, by the same thing.

If the infection was cleaned, then that person is doing the same exact things that got him infected in the first place. Some people just don't learn from their own mistakes. And no one is forced to use IE, but they are so used to it, they're scared to use anything else, and that there is the starting point to getting infected while surfing the Internet.

#8 ghostwriter

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Posted 29 December 2006 - 06:51 PM

To fozzie,

I agree with you on that 100%.

But I see that the main problem is that people are using IE in the first place. That browser alone will get you infected. And that's without downloading anything. It's from simply using it, and going to web sites that may be infected. But IE provides no protection for your browsing needs. That's the main problem.




This might be a silly question but....what does IE stand for???
What you do in life does matter……Each choice and action you make has
consequences, good or bad. Which path will you take?

#9 Animal

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Posted 29 December 2006 - 07:25 PM

The only silly question, is the unasked one. For then, knowledge is wasted.

IE is a common abbreviation for Internet Explorer. Microsoft's embedded browser in their windows products.

Be (Alternative Browser) Safe :thumbsup:

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#10 ghostwriter

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Posted 29 December 2006 - 08:09 PM

Thank you :thumbsup:
What you do in life does matter……Each choice and action you make has
consequences, good or bad. Which path will you take?

#11 DSTM

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Posted 30 December 2006 - 12:09 AM


To fozzie,

I agree with you on that 100%.

But I see that the main problem is that people are using IE in the first place. That browser alone will get you infected. And that's without downloading anything. It's from simply using it, and going to web sites that may be infected. But IE provides no protection for your browsing needs. That's the main problem.




This might be a silly question but....what does IE stand for???

This may be a silly question also.I read somewhere that a software called Sandboxie or something like that prevented your PC from being infected,if you were using IE.If I downloaded FF, can I switch back to IE and vice-versa at will without any drama.?

DSTM.

Edited by DSTM, 30 December 2006 - 04:52 AM.















#12 unloaded

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Posted 02 January 2007 - 09:40 PM

it might be a better idea to use Firefox, it's very similar to IE7.

#13 fozzie

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Posted 02 January 2007 - 09:54 PM



To fozzie,

I agree with you on that 100%.

But I see that the main problem is that people are using IE in the first place. That browser alone will get you infected. And that's without downloading anything. It's from simply using it, and going to web sites that may be infected. But IE provides no protection for your browsing needs. That's the main problem.




This might be a silly question but....what does IE stand for???

This may be a silly question also.I read somewhere that a software called Sandboxie or something like that prevented your PC from being infected,if you were using IE.If I downloaded FF, can I switch back to IE and vice-versa at will without any drama.?

DSTM.

Posted ImagePosted Image
:thumbsup: I have done a google on Sandbox, since I never heared of it.here some info

As far as your question regarding IE and FF Yes you can :flowers:

Edited by fozzie, 02 January 2007 - 09:55 PM.


#14 DSTM

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Posted 03 January 2007 - 01:43 AM




To fozzie,

I agree with you on that 100%.

But I see that the main problem is that people are using IE in the first place. That browser alone will get you infected. And that's without downloading anything. It's from simply using it, and going to web sites that may be infected. But IE provides no protection for your browsing needs. That's the main problem.




This might be a silly question but....what does IE stand for???

This may be a silly question also.I read somewhere that a software called Sandboxie or something like that prevented your PC from being infected,if you were using IE.If I downloaded FF, can I switch back to IE and vice-versa at will without any drama.?

DSTM.

Posted ImagePosted Image
:thumbsup: I have done a google on Sandbox, since I never heared of it.here some info

As far as your question regarding IE and FF Yes you can :flowers:

Thanks, Fozzie for info.Always a bit apprehensive trying new software as I have a tendency to stuff up.
Just need more confidence thats all. :trumpet:















#15 fozzie

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Posted 03 January 2007 - 08:25 AM

I am a bit reluctant to try new security software. Perhaps you can post the question here?




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