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A Tragedy


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21 replies to this topic

#1 DSTM

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Posted 07 December 2006 - 02:58 AM

James Kim was Senior Editor at CNET.
I felt so sad reading this report.He gave his life to try and save his young family against impossible odds.
James Kim,you are a "HERO".
May you REST IN PEACE.

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#2 HitSquad

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Posted 07 December 2006 - 09:33 AM

A tragedy? For sure. Unfortunetly, it happens in the Oregon wilderness more often then publicized.
A hero? The locals would use a much harsher term. :flowers:
I've serveyed the Rouge River Basin and traveled the Merlin Galice road. That road is tricky enough in summer. You do not even attempt it in the winter by automobile. There are numerous logging roads along that route that could easily be mistaken as part of the main road when snow covered as well. It is really not maintained in winter nor are there the needed amount of warning signs for people who have never traveled it. For the life of me I can't understand why he went down into the canyons unless he thought he could follow the river back to Merlin. Though rivers often lead to civilization, they are often the longest route because they wind. Oh well, I guess we'll never know. :thumbsup:

#3 nlinecomputers

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Posted 07 December 2006 - 09:55 AM

If the road is so treacherous why is it not road blocked and closed?

I ask this from the security of being in the middle of flat west Texas desert land where snow is only a theoretical concept. :thumbsup:
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#4 tink536

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Posted 07 December 2006 - 10:10 AM

Just heard about this story yesterday and then this...so tragic.

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#5 HitSquad

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Posted 07 December 2006 - 10:42 AM

If the road is so treacherous why is it not road blocked and closed?

It travels through the Siskiyou National Forest and the town of Agness sits right in the middle of it.
If nothing else, it's the only ground rescue avenue available for 100's of square miles of wilderness.
It "looks" good on a map but if you ask any of the locals, they'll tell you to stay off it in winter.
I think clear warnings every couple of miles or so would be sufficient. They should also designate what is a logging road and what is not. There are literally thousands of these type of secondary roads across America that only the locals have full knowledge of and are never closed. They like it that way. :thumbsup: I'm sure you probably have a few down in West Texas that only the locals "really" know nlinecomputers.

Edited by HitSquad, 07 December 2006 - 11:01 AM.


#6 boopme

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Posted 07 December 2006 - 01:32 PM

This is a terrible tradgedy. The loss to the family, their trauma.
But it should serve as a reminder that people need to have some basic survival skills. The poor man wandered some 13 miles for help. Moving 8 miles then 5 in another direction. He was found a mile from the car. that is even sadder.

Edited by boopme, 07 December 2006 - 01:32 PM.

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#7 nlinecomputers

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Posted 07 December 2006 - 01:47 PM

If the road is so treacherous why is it not road blocked and closed?

It travels through the Siskiyou National Forest and the town of Agness sits right in the middle of it.
If nothing else, it's the only ground rescue avenue available for 100's of square miles of wilderness.
It "looks" good on a map but if you ask any of the locals, they'll tell you to stay off it in winter.
I think clear warnings every couple of miles or so would be sufficient. They should also designate what is a logging road and what is not. There are literally thousands of these type of secondary roads across America that only the locals have full knowledge of and are never closed. They like it that way. :thumbsup: I'm sure you probably have a few down in West Texas that only the locals "really" know nlinecomputers.



Yes and no. We don't have the environment you do and frankly Texas is pretty good about it's roads. In General Texas keeps better roads then many states do but we also don't have the weather conditions that destroy roads either so it's easier for us to do so.
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#8 DSTM

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Posted 07 December 2006 - 02:25 PM

A tragedy? For sure. Unfortunetly, it happens in the Oregon wilderness more often then publicized.
A hero? The locals would use a much harsher term. :flowers:
I've serveyed the Rouge River Basin and traveled the Merlin Galice road. That road is tricky enough in summer. You do not even attempt it in the winter by automobile. There are numerous logging roads along that route that could easily be mistaken as part of the main road when snow covered as well. It is really not maintained in winter nor are there the needed amount of warning signs for people who have never traveled it. For the life of me I can't understand why he went down into the canyons unless he thought he could follow the river back to Merlin. Though rivers often lead to civilization, they are often the longest route because they wind. Oh well, I guess we'll never know. :thumbsup:

A few weather advisory warning signs may have saved this mans life,and also years of sorrow for the survivors.I feel for the young children involved.Nobody deserves to freeze to death,when maybe it could have been avoided.I can imagine how happy the family must have been to be going on this trip,and then tragedy strikes.How unfortunate.Let this be a lesson to all of us to take every precaution possible,when visiting unfamiliar terrain, so we don't end up in a similar situation.

Edited by DSTM, 07 December 2006 - 02:29 PM.















#9 HitSquad

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Posted 07 December 2006 - 02:55 PM

We don't have the environment you do and frankly Texas is pretty good about it's roads.

I don't live in Oregon (Chicago area resident) but my work takes me from the Southern Colorado Rockies north through Wyoming, Montana, the Pacific Northwest and in to Alaska. Illinois takes very good care of it's roads as well (unlike Michigan were I'm originally from). I would have thought portions of Texas might be prone to flash floods or other such unexpected conditions that sometimes happen in Arizona and Nevada.
Ran across more the one washed out road in the SW. :thumbsup:

Let this be a lesson to all of us to take every precaution possible,when visiting unfamiliar terrain, so we don't end up in a similar situation.

Amen to that. Because I travel that portion of the country every year, my SUV is always loaded with survival equipment during winter. The really sad part of this story is that had he stayed put, he'd be alive.
Something as simple as protective ware and a compass would have done it too.

#10 nlinecomputers

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Posted 07 December 2006 - 04:24 PM

Floods can happen but not often here in Midland Tx. When they do they close the road. But the water clears in few days. It's not snow pack like the mountains or the northern plains states.
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#11 Klinkaroo

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Posted 07 December 2006 - 11:26 PM

This is very tragic but I only have one little question...

He got lost right? Why didn't he have a GPS... He worked for CNET plus he owned a couple of clothing stores (so the guy isn't poor), if he didn't get one free and he loved electronic things so I am sure that would have been something that he would have no?

Edited by Klinkaroo, 07 December 2006 - 11:27 PM.


#12 wesburnsco86

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Posted 08 December 2006 - 12:22 AM

I guess theres no such thing as being over prepared for such a thing.Was this guy just on some joy ride?
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#13 DSTM

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Posted 08 December 2006 - 06:13 AM

I guess theres no such thing as being over prepared for such a thing.Was this guy just on some joy ride?

I agree with you,one can never be over prepared for every scenario that could eventuate.
This 35 yr old professional business man. taking his wife and family on a trip in the snow country,
could hardly be called a "Joy Ride" IMHO.

DSTM.

Edited by DSTM, 08 December 2006 - 09:52 AM.















#14 nlinecomputers

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Posted 08 December 2006 - 09:01 AM

On this subject. Link to good advice on winter driving.

http://www.roadtripamerica.com/travelplann...ter-Driving.htm
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#15 Klinkaroo

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Posted 08 December 2006 - 09:41 AM

He wasn't joy riding, they we're going back to San Francissco from a Thanksgiving Weekend in Oregon with their family and they took a wrong turn.




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