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Memory Architecturer


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#1 afridy

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Posted 28 November 2006 - 02:24 PM

Hai friends.

Conventional Memory: The first 640 KB of system memory is the (in)famous conventional memory that every PC user has over time grown to know and hate. This is the area that is available for use by standard DOS programs, along with many drivers, memory-resident programs, and most anything else that has to run under standard DOS. It is found at addresses 00000h to 9FFFFh.


Friends. i just strtd to learn the memory architecturer. i am now very good in Hexa, binry, decimal number systems etc. In the above quote when talking about Conventional Memory it says "It is found at addresses 00000h to 9FFFFh". when interpred to decimal it shows 0 to 655,359 .
Now my questions is

What is this 0 to 655,359 in memory? Can any body pls explain with an example?

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#2 pip22

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Posted 28 November 2006 - 02:38 PM

It's from 0 - 655,359 bytes which is the first 640 kilobytes of RAM (655,359 divided by 1024, since there are actually 1024 bytes to a kilobyte, not 1000 as many people think, mainly as a result of being misinformed.

Edited by pip22, 28 November 2006 - 02:40 PM.


#3 afridy

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Posted 30 November 2006 - 11:57 AM

It's from 0 - 655,359 bytes which is the first 640 kilobytes of RAM (655,359 divided by 1024, since there are actually 1024 bytes to a kilobyte, not 1000 as many people think, mainly as a result of being misinformed.


Hai pip22 Thank you for the answer.

I also wanted to know how this 640k or the total memory available in computer have devided in to storage locations (i am not mean conventional/upper/hma/xms)?

what each storage capacity?

How single memeory storage location is identified?

Pls...

#4 usasma

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Posted 04 December 2006 - 06:48 AM

In the old days computers could only access that first 640 kB of memory (actually it was 1 mB with some reserved) - and there had to be special "tricks" in order to access more.

I haven't studied this in a long while, but I believe that the 640 k is a part of the conventional memory - and everything above it is the uppper/hma/xms memory.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Upper_Memory_Area
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