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Linux: Replacing Graphics Card Woes


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#1 Mike000000001

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Posted 25 November 2006 - 10:55 AM

Well, I am used to replacing hardware in PCs and I have not had such problems since the bad old days of NT4! :thumbsup:

I thought replacing my ageing Nvidia 440 with a newer 6200 would be a breeze, like it is on an XP OS. Instead, when I rebooted I found that KDE failed to run and I was left with a CLI and no idea what to do.

Eventually I did an in-place reinstall of SUSE 10.1, but since then YAST still shows my card as a 440. Surprisingly, there appears to be no option to change that.

So, please, gurus, what did I do wrong and what should I do??? :flowers:

Mike

Edited by Mike000000001, 25 November 2006 - 11:22 AM.


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#2 Joedude

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Posted 26 November 2006 - 01:16 AM

wow, you did a reinstall? Have you got a GUI desktop or are you in command line? If it's GUI (KDE) then you have to go through yast to install the NVidia drivers, then use the device manager to manually select your card...if it's not there, then....

You'll have to do a search for the drivers. NVidia used to have great open source support, but lately I have been reading a lot of people saying they were having trouble. I seem to remember a lot of them were with the 6000 series as well. I will do more research on this and let you know. Have you considered using another distro :D
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#3 Mike000000001

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Posted 26 November 2006 - 01:15 PM

Hi Joedude

Thanks for the reply!

I did a reinstall because KDE no longer ran! I did it as an "update" so it kept my settings.

In YaST I see the hardware tab (no device manager) but under graphics card I only see the old one and no way of changing it.

I did install the NVidia driver and in does put a link to NVIDIA X Server settings in my System menu, which does show the correct card.

And yes, I have thought of another distro, but I guess that would mean reinstalling everything? (Or can I do an "update"? I have a Mandriva One DVD here, is that OK? I tried Ubuntu but all I got even with the old card was a blank screen!

Mike

Edited by Mike000000001, 26 November 2006 - 01:16 PM.


#4 Joedude

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Posted 26 November 2006 - 01:39 PM

LOL...It was a joke kind of. Reffering to the deal Novell (the makers of Suse) made with MS. If you prefer Suse, then that's what you like and I aint gonna tell you to change what you like. There is a problem with changing distro's though. Unless you specified otherwise, Suse uses rieser3 file system for a default. Most other nix's use ext2, or ext3. So you would probably have to repartition as well (honestly I haven't played with SuSE since 9.2), which means you would loose that data.

Option 1: If this is available, transfer it over to another Hard drive for storage which isn't in the drive you plan to repartition. When you install the new OS, you simply transfer it back. I have never heard of migrating settings cross platform, only files.

Option 2: We'll stick this out together and see what we can work out.

I had a similar problem understanding YAST. If I remember correctly, when you log in as root, there should be more options in YAST. Yes, I know just to use YAST you have to imput your root password anyway. Now, go to the hardware tab, I believe you can right click on it and go to properties, this is where you can manually change it. At least it was in 9.2. It may be different now. I abandoned SuSE after a year or so of use due to things like this. Having to tell it in 2 places what I was using regularly was getting annoying. Anyway, I digress. You should be presented an option of changing your driver and selecting the hardware you have. If they have changed it since 9.2, then you and I will learn together and figure this out, it's fun for me anyway, and I love to see satisfied Linux users, whatever thier distro. If I can't find the answer for you, or help you to find the answer, I will find someone who can and is willing. I say willing because a lot of Linux users I know stopped using Suse as soon as they heard aout that deal. It shouldn't prevent us from finding out the right answer though. I am going to SuSE's web site right now and looking for your answer.
If someone tells you to su rm -rf /
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Be in the know, Bash smart!

#5 Mike000000001

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Posted 26 November 2006 - 03:29 PM

Actually (a) I have lots of backup space and (:thumbsup: I mostly have nothing much but settings and email so a reinstall is no problem.

I am in as root now and I see Hardware Information, but that shows the graphics card correctly.

The Graphics Card and Monitor setting still shows the wrong card though.

Thanks for the info about SUSE, I will bear it in mind. I am annoyed that Ubuntu doesn't install but Mandriva is still a possibility I guess. One thing, though, is that I would prefer tot to have this hassle when I change graphics cards, disks, etc!

Mike

#6 Joedude

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Posted 26 November 2006 - 04:41 PM

what does sax say? In yast that is/
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#7 Mike000000001

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Posted 26 November 2006 - 05:58 PM

MX 440

#8 Joedude

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Posted 27 November 2006 - 12:42 AM

can you bring up the properties or advanced properties there?

Edited by Joedude, 27 November 2006 - 04:03 AM.

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#9 Joedude

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Posted 27 November 2006 - 04:02 AM

OK, they have changed YAST, so you'll have to be a bit patient with me. In SuSE I found it best to use YAST as it seemed to make sure all the dependencies were met and it didn't mess up kernel space and user space(Terms which apply to the functioning of drivers between your dsesktop to the processor to your hardware). Anyway, here's the site I found about Yast and replacing the driver, is this how you did it? I doubt it, this is actually concerning getting the acceleration to work right. But it may fix your problem, also beware there is a note this could break some systems. Make sure you read it thoroughly and check the compatabilities before you try it, or decide not to try it. Mind you this could be useless for you as well.

Novell cool solutions

Edited by Joedude, 27 November 2006 - 04:12 AM.

If someone tells you to su rm -rf /
DON'T DO IT!!!!
Be in the know, Bash smart!

#10 Mike000000001

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Posted 01 December 2006 - 03:50 PM

Mmmm! I already had the NVidia driver working on SuSE.

I have been away for a bit repairing my PC. :trumpet:

Tried Kubuntu and followed the above instructions and ended up with a system that would not boot xwindows again! :flowers:

I am back with SuSE again now. I have also tried ubuntu, mandriva 2007 and debian in passing. In each, some bit of hardware failed to work, or in the case of debian xwindows failed completely. Just got a command prompt.

State of play now:

My TV card, a Hauppauge WinTV Nova-T, fails completely

My webcam is unrecognized

I can't get any software on magazine CDs to run.

And I STILL don't know how I would replace a bit of hardware without the system crashing.

Haven't even tried my MP3 player and camera yet, too busy pratting around struggling with the above systems. :thumbsup:

Mike

Edited by Mike000000001, 01 December 2006 - 03:52 PM.


#11 Joedude

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Posted 01 December 2006 - 05:11 PM

That particular card works well with MythTV in Debian...so I don't understand what's happening.

What are you running now and what exactly are the errors.

Oh, never mind. Suse. If you got the command prompt, there was probably an error in installation. You could have just typed sartx and it should have worked.

What kind of webcam is it? What have you tried so far?

How are you trying to execute the software cd's? What Cd's?

Before we get a whole list of what I'd like to do's, let's deal with what's on the plate now.

Edited by Joedude, 01 December 2006 - 05:14 PM.

If someone tells you to su rm -rf /
DON'T DO IT!!!!
Be in the know, Bash smart!




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