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Hackers Aim to Sabotage Holiday Computing


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#1 KoanYorel

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Posted 24 December 2004 - 05:17 PM

SAN JOSE, Calif. (AP) - Hackers, spammers and spies go into overdrive in December and January, when unsuspecting neophytes unwrap new computers, connect to the Internet, and, too often, get hit with viruses, spyware and other nefarious programs. "People want to get on the Net right away, just like they want to put together and start using any Christmas present," said Tony Redmond, chief technology officer of Palo Alto, Calif.-based computer giant Hewlett-Packard Co., whose new PCs ship with 60 days of virus and adware protection. "They should be warned that the Net is a very, very dangerous place."Dec 24, 3:47 PM (ET) By RACHEL KONRAD Susan Love's problems began with a smile. The New York City fund-raiser clicked on a happy-face attachment in a friend's e-mail last year. The virus crashed her computer within an hour. Love, 57, salvaged her data. But within a few months her computer's performance slowed to a crawl. In December 2003, she upgraded to a Sony Vaio with an extra-large monitor and Microsoft Windows XP operating system. Within a few days, "spyware" - programs that sneak onto computers uninvited - began sponging up valuable memory. Then her e-mail stopped arriving. Instead of crafting holiday e-mails, she spent hours installing the latest antivirus, anti-advertising and anti-spyware software. She also instituted a rule: Her computer never gets turned off, so security programs patch vulnerabilities around the clock. "You have to become something of a nerd to make sure your computer is safe," said Love, a former English teacher who recently installed anti-adware on her daughter's computer. "If you don't sweep the computer every night, you could hit." Love won't be the last to get a holiday crash-course in computer security. Although few researchers produce holiday-specific security data, experts at IBM Corp., Dell Inc. (DELL), Hewlett-Packard Co., software companies and Internet service providers agree that the holidays are prime time for hackers. Holiday viruses are so rampant that consumers could be attacked even if their first online destination is to a Web site for updating security patches.
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#2 cowsgonemadd3

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Posted 24 December 2004 - 09:27 PM

"

SAN JOSE, Calif. (AP) - Hackers, spammers and spies go into overdrive in December and January, when unsuspecting neophytes unwrap new computers, connect to the Internet, and, too often, get hit with viruses, spyware and other nefarious programs.

"People want to get on the Net right away, just like they want to put together and start using any Christmas present," said Tony Redmond, chief technology officer of Palo Alto, Calif.-based computer giant Hewlett-Packard Co., whose new PCs ship with 60 days of virus and adware protection. "They should be warned that the Net is a very, very dangerous place."

Dec 24, 3:47 PM (ET) By RACHEL KONRAD

Susan Love's problems began with a smile.

The New York City fund-raiser clicked on a happy-face attachment in a friend's e-mail last year. The virus crashed her computer within an hour.

Love, 57, salvaged her data. But within a few months her computer's performance slowed to a crawl. In December 2003, she upgraded to a Sony Vaio with an extra-large monitor and Microsoft Windows XP operating system.

Within a few days, "spyware" - programs that sneak onto computers uninvited - began sponging up valuable memory. Then her e-mail stopped arriving."

Let me just say this is why sites like this should be working as hard as we can to tell people that you cant just do anything and everything online.

I know we have helped so many people but were not getting people or many thats not already infected or have been.

We need help! We need all pc makers DELL,HP,SONY and so on to put stuff in there manual to let people know of stuff like this.

They just need to know! Its not fair to give them a pc and say have fun. Its like giving a kid a gun!

Am I making sense?

We should be able to read in a new pc's manuals something about online safety right out of the box!

We should have links to sites like this that can help a new pc owner understand.

I have neighbors who have had many viruses and spyware but refuse to download anything online! But yet thats have the problem.

You need to download a free or paid antivirus program,a spyware/adware remover program and a firewall.

All can be free but the point of "But I have to download them" cant be a excuse.

I wish they would have listened to me. I wanted to give them a firewall but they didnt listen and got viruses galor and it almost ruined there pc and they still dont know what did it.

I hope ive made sense. I also hope I havent written to much. This is just my opinion on it.

Microsoft should be number 1 to make a manual on stuff like internet protection with his pcs!

Thanks for your time!




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