Jump to content


 


Register a free account to unlock additional features at BleepingComputer.com
Welcome to BleepingComputer, a free community where people like yourself come together to discuss and learn how to use their computers. Using the site is easy and fun. As a guest, you can browse and view the various discussions in the forums, but can not create a new topic or reply to an existing one unless you are logged in. Other benefits of registering an account are subscribing to topics and forums, creating a blog, and having no ads shown anywhere on the site.


Click here to Register a free account now! or read our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Photo

Scanning Images From Magazine


  • Please log in to reply
4 replies to this topic

#1 Verons88

Verons88

  • Members
  • 156 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Kuala Lumpur
  • Local time:06:23 PM

Posted 16 November 2006 - 01:54 AM

Hi, does anyone know how to get a good scanned picture from printed materials? (magazine, postcard, brochures, etc).

For example, my son loves Pokemon, and asked me to scan in some images from his trading card deck. Then enlarge it and make a wall paper for his computer. My problem is, the enlarged images has lots of 'noise' (is that what u call it?) or shall I say 'dots' or 'grains' ??? Is it possible to get a crisp clear sharp images from printed material without the dots? I have tried the option 'descreen printed original' from my scanner, and tried scanning in 600dpi but it still dont looks that good.

*Im currently using HP Scanjet 3400C (it's a bit old, but its faithfull, working fine)

Thanks

-veronica yeoh- :thumbsup:
Veronica Yeoh

BC AdBot (Login to Remove)

 


m

#2 tg1911

tg1911

    Lord Spam Magnet


  • Members
  • 19,274 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:SW Louisiana
  • Local time:04:23 AM

Posted 16 November 2006 - 02:29 AM

When you scan an image, you have just so much information about that image, stored.
When you try to enlarge the image, the program has to "guess" what is to occupy the additional space between the pixels, created by the enlargement.
Most programs aren't very good at "guessing".
I imagine, there are some high-end (expensive) image editing programs that are better at "guessing", than other programs, but I can't say for sure.
Even then, I'd imagine the results would be mediocre, at best.

I found a few wallpapers online, that you might be able to use:
3D Pokemon Wallpaper - 800 x 600, and 1024 x 768
Some more 3D - 800 x 600
MOBO: GIGABYTE GA-MA790X-UD4P, CPU: Phenom II X4 955 Deneb BE, HS/F: CoolerMaster V8, RAM: 2 x 1G Kingston HyperX DDR2 800, VGA: ECS GeForce Black GTX 560, PSU: Antec TruePower Modular 750W, Soundcard: Asus Xonar D1, Case: CoolerMaster COSMOS 1000, Storage: Internal - 2 x Seagate 250GB SATA, 2 x WD 1TB SATA; External - Seagate 500GB USB, WD 640GB eSATA, 3 x WD 1TB eSATA

Become a BleepingComputer fan: Facebook

#3 stevealmighty

stevealmighty

    Bleepin' WormBreath


  • Members
  • 2,629 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Upstate NY
  • Local time:05:23 AM

Posted 17 November 2006 - 08:41 AM

tg1911 nailed that one, that's exactly what's happening (interpolation, it's the area that's between the pixels, as pixels are shaped like stop signs, so when you put them together, there's an "empty" spot in between them that the program has to guess what color or information should go there). Photoshop does really good with guessing what's in there, depending on the method that you use to do so. Photoshop can be yours for the low low price of about $600 :thumbsup:

One thing about your post that I noticed is that you are scanning at 600 dpi....I should think that it's "overscanning" IMHO. One thing to keep in mind when scanning an image that you're not going to print and will only use for viewing on a computer screen is that most monitors only display at 72 dpi. Sooooo...if you're scanning in at 600 dpi, and will only view the image at 72 dpi....big difference! Also, scanning at that high of a dpi will pick up every little thing that's on the image, including dust and hair. You can manually lower the resolution of your scan right from within the scanner itself. Also, if you're enlarging it, you should be able to adjust the output size (enlarge to etc. etc.) from within the scanner settings. This will help you to avoid taking an image that's normally 2 inches wide by 3 inches tall and literally stretching it to be 8 inches wide by 10 inches tall (out of proportion, I know, but it's just an example :flowers: ), which will stretch the pixels in turn making the entire image look bad.

Now, on the other end of the spectrum, scanning at to low of a setting (low dpi), then when you look at it, it's going to look bad anyways, simply from a lack of quality. I tend to scan at 80 dpi for the web or 200 dpi if I'm going to print.

Best thing to do if you're wanting to scan images to display on your computer is to find them on the internet, as they'll already be designed and ready for "web use", so they're pratically guarenteed to look good! tg1911 has provided links that should be able to help you find what you're looking for!
War produces veterans, wounded both physically and mentally. They have sacrificed for us.....and it is now our job to help these veterans, as they have already helped us in ways we will never know, in ways that we cannot fathom, and in ways that we take granted every day.
Posted Image

#4 Verons88

Verons88
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 156 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Kuala Lumpur
  • Local time:06:23 PM

Posted 17 November 2006 - 10:44 AM

Thanks for the reply, tg1911 & stevealmighty.

This is the 1st time I scan a picture to make a wallpaper. I normally scan at high dpi (300) when I edit pictures with photoshop. I once used 600dpi to scan in my dad's driving license (abt 1" by 1.5") photo to enlarge it to 8R size, when he pass away months ago. That's the only photo of my dad I have. I got to use photoshop to edit/touch up it as the original photo is crinkly, old and torn. So I might be too carried away the idea of high res scanning, not knowing I only need 72dpi for comp wallpaper. (to me Big dpi = big picture, lol) Now I understand after steve explained it.
Regarding the Pokemon, I appreaciate your link, my son is happy to when I showed it to him. But he wish me to scan in his 'prize card' with all the 'power details' below the card. Meantime he's enjoying changing his wallpaper in almost daily basis after I got them from tg1911's link.

Another thing, I need to to scan from magazine, catalog, brochures for my mom because she's starting a side income selling products for a few company. So she want a 'personnal brochure / catalog' which I will make for her, then later maybe send it to offset printings.

Edited by Verons88, 17 November 2006 - 10:45 AM.

Veronica Yeoh

#5 tg1911

tg1911

    Lord Spam Magnet


  • Members
  • 19,274 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:SW Louisiana
  • Local time:04:23 AM

Posted 18 November 2006 - 10:38 AM

You're welcome, Verons88.
Glad your son liked the links.
MOBO: GIGABYTE GA-MA790X-UD4P, CPU: Phenom II X4 955 Deneb BE, HS/F: CoolerMaster V8, RAM: 2 x 1G Kingston HyperX DDR2 800, VGA: ECS GeForce Black GTX 560, PSU: Antec TruePower Modular 750W, Soundcard: Asus Xonar D1, Case: CoolerMaster COSMOS 1000, Storage: Internal - 2 x Seagate 250GB SATA, 2 x WD 1TB SATA; External - Seagate 500GB USB, WD 640GB eSATA, 3 x WD 1TB eSATA

Become a BleepingComputer fan: Facebook




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users