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Computter Enters Sleep Mode


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#1 beecee

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Posted 12 November 2006 - 05:53 PM

Thought i had virus(computer kept shutting down to enter sleep mode) I have since reset to original factory settings but it still wants to enter sleep mode. can any one offer assistance?. :thumbsup:

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#2 Enthusiast

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Posted 12 November 2006 - 06:19 PM

STANDBY:
Standby is a state in which your monitor and hard disks turn off, so that your computer uses less power. When you want to use the computer again, it comes out of standby quickly, and your desktop is restored exactly as you left it. Use standby to save power when you will be away from the computer for a short time while working. Because Standby does not save your desktop state to disk, a power failure while on Standby can cause you to lose unsaved information.

To automatically put your computer on standby
Open Power Options in Control Panel.
In Power Schemes, click the down arrow, and then select a power scheme. The time settings for the power scheme are displayed in System standby, Turn off monitor, and Turn off hard disks.
To turn off your monitor before your computer goes on standby, select a time in Turn off monitor.
To turn off your hard disk before your computer goes on standby, select a time in Turn off hard disks.

To open Power Options, click Start, point to Settings, click Control Panel, and then double-click Power Options.
You might want to save your work before putting your computer on standby. While the computer is on standby, information in computer memory is not saved to your hard disk. If there is an interruption in power, information in memory is lost.

To create a new power scheme, specify the time settings you want, and then click Save As.

If you're using a portable computer, you can specify one setting for battery power and a different setting for AC power.

To put your computer on standby, you must have a computer that is set up by the manufacturer to support this option.

To manually put your computer on standby
Open Power Options in Control Panel.
On the Advanced tab, under When I press the power button on my computer, click Standby. If you are using a portable computer, click Standby under When I close the lid of my portable computer.
Click OK or Apply, and then turn off the power or close the lid of your portable computer.

To open Power Options, click Start, point to Settings, click Control Panel, and then double-click Power Options.

You can also put your computer on standby by clicking Start and then clicking Shut Down. In the What do you want the computer to do drop-down list, click Stand by.

You might want to save your work before putting your computer on standby. While the computer is on standby, information in computer memory is not saved on your hard disk. If there is an interruption in power, information in memory is lost.

To put your computer on standby, you must have a computer that is set up by the manufacturer to support this option.

Using Power Options in Control Panel, you can adjust any power management option that your computer's unique hardware configuration supports. Because these options may vary widely from computer to computer, the options described may differ from what you see. Power Options automatically detects what is available on your computer and shows you only the options that you can control.


Hibernation:
Hibernation is a state in which your computer shuts down to save power but first saves everything in memory on your hard disk. When you restart the computer, your desktop is restored exactly as you left it. Use hibernation to save power when you will be away from the computer for an extended time while working.

To automatically put your computer into hibernation
You must be logged on as an administrator or a member of the Administrators group in order to complete this procedure. If your computer is connected to a network, network policy settings might also prevent you from completing this procedure.

Open Power Options in Control Panel.
Click the Hibernate tab, select the Enable hibernate support check box, and then click Apply.
If the Hibernate tab is unavailable, your computer does not support this feature.

Click the APM tab, click Enable Advanced Power Management support, and then click Apply.
The APM tab is unavailable on ACPI-compliant computers. ACPI automatically enables Advanced Power Management, which disables the APM tab.

Click the Power Schemes tab, and then select a time period in System hibernates. Your computer hibernates after it has been idle for the specified amount of time.

To open Power Options, click Start, point to Settings, click Control Panel, and then double-click Power Options.

When you put your computer into hibernation, everything in computer memory is saved on your hard disk, and your computer is switched off. When you turn the computer back on, all programs and documents that were open when you turned the computer off are restored on the desktop.
To put your computer into hibernation, you must have a computer that is set up by the manufacturer to support this option.

Using Power Options in Control Panel, you can adjust any power management option that your computer's unique hardware configuration supports. Because these options may vary widely from computer to computer, the options described may differ from what you see. Power Options automatically detects what is available on your computer and shows you only the options that you can control.

To manually put your computer into hibernation
You must be logged on as an administrator or a member of either the Administrators or Power Users group in order to complete this procedure. If your computer is connected to a network, network policy settings might also prevent you from completing this procedure.

Open Power Options in Control Panel.
Click the Hibernate tab, and then select the Enable hibernate support check box.
If the Hibernate tab is not available, your computer does not support this feature.

Click OK to close the Power Options dialog box.
Click Start, and then click Shut Down. In the What do you want the computer to do drop-down list, click Hibernate.

To open Power Options, click Start, point to Settings, click Control Panel, and then double-click Power Options.

When you put your computer into hibernation, everything in computer memory is saved on your hard disk. When you turn the computer back on, all programs and documents that were open when you turned the computer off are restored on the desktop.

To put your computer into hibernation, you must have a computer whose components and BIOS support this option.

Using Power Options in Control Panel, you can adjust any power management option that your computer's unique hardware configuration supports. Because these options may vary widely from computer to computer, the options described may differ from what you see. Power Options automatically detects what is available on your computer and shows you only the options that you can control.
-The above from Windows Help




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