Jump to content


 


Register a free account to unlock additional features at BleepingComputer.com
Welcome to BleepingComputer, a free community where people like yourself come together to discuss and learn how to use their computers. Using the site is easy and fun. As a guest, you can browse and view the various discussions in the forums, but can not create a new topic or reply to an existing one unless you are logged in. Other benefits of registering an account are subscribing to topics and forums, creating a blog, and having no ads shown anywhere on the site.


Click here to Register a free account now! or read our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Photo

Request For Decision On Unix/linux Software


  • Please log in to reply
5 replies to this topic

#1 Walkman

Walkman

  • Banned
  • 1,327 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:01:37 PM

Posted 31 October 2006 - 10:44 PM

I hope this is the correct forum, if not, please move.

I've gotten a new 160G hd, and I've decided that I'm not going to be using Windows, but rather a Unix/Linux system.

I've downloaded Fedora 5 approximately a month or so ago, and I have these few questions if you don't mind helping decide which would be better for me. Please note that I've never actually had my own UNIX/Linux servers, but all of my remote servers have been. So in other words, I'm very new to to it, and I am going to learn it like I'm still learning Windows (16 years+).

A few questions, if you don't mind.

1. Should I use the version of Fedora 5 I downloaded or should I download a newer version, if available?
2. Which Unix/Linux servers are you using, and what version, if possible??
3. How limited is the software usability I can run on them, compared to the Windows?

I know my whole life has been Windows, and I must say, it's been great, but now I must move on to, what I feel, something more stable and quality stsndards upheld. I've always knew ( "One Man's Opinion") that Linux/Unix, even the Mac is more stable than Windows... my personal opinion on it.

Besides, I do have 2 seperate servers running here, locally, and I'm using Apache, MySQL, PHP,... you know?... the whole works,, and what I do is better, and more stable than on a Windows os.... As a matter of fact, those server manuals, (Apache, MySQL, and all of those programs are catered to the Unix/Linux system.... and with me using those exact servers to run them, I'm confident I'll be good at it in no time, I can promise you that much. It's been a passion for me to run this BRAND NEW WORLD.

And please, spare me the horror stories I'll encounter. I'm willing to go through them, and avoid whatever I can as much as possible. I do have a good start already, because I am familiar with Apache, CGI, PHP, MySQL, databases, HTML, Perl, and a host of many of them.... because I use them on a daily baises.

So far, on each of my computers, neither one of my servers ever crashed.. and it's just past 2 years now. So, I'm ready. Throw any insight you may have on this. I'm also members of a those groups too, and wherever I need to be, I'll always make the effort to do so.


Thanks for listening ladies & gentlemen. I want to be ready, because once I crack open that 160G hd box, I'm going forward, and I want to be armed with enough knowledge to get it done.

BC AdBot (Login to Remove)

 


#2 Trio3b

Trio3b

  • Members
  • 95 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:11:37 AM

Posted 01 November 2006 - 12:58 AM

Just thought I'd chime in here because you mentioned you're linux-new. I'm more familiar with desktop usage (about 2 yrs.) but if you've done server/network admin in Windows, you probably have a headstart. To answer your questions:

1. Newer is not necessarily better. Sometimes maintainers feel pressured to release early before a distro is really ready. Read some reviews by users.
2. Using Mandrake 10.2 /w KDE 3.3.4 desktop. ( 2.6-11.6 kernel ) asst. servers are dhcp-server /ssh for networking/ CUPS server for printing, Squid proxy server for internet sharing.
3. Not sure what you mean by limited usability.

The only advice I can give is to stick with more mainstream distros for now as there will be a larger user base and therefore more user help. Beware the hype surrounding some distros as most of them are able to do most anything in the hands of a competent admin. Try several distros, but avoid hopscotching from one to another as it eventually just prolongs the learning curve. If you prefer command line, they will pretty much all do what you need. If you're a GUI person, one way to approach it is to decide which window manager/Desktop suits your tastes, because underneath it you'll still have the CL.


Also, you may want to setup a cheap linux box that you can "trash" and learn about your "brave new world" . A decent Plll can be had for under $100.

good luck

Edited by Trio3b, 01 November 2006 - 01:29 AM.


#3 rubiconeye

rubiconeye

  • Members
  • 156 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:06:37 PM

Posted 01 November 2006 - 12:30 PM

hi, walkman,

i'm quite new to linux also, i am using ubuntu which i find great fun, and easy going. i know ubuntu do a server version also, but you dont even have to install it if you want to 'size it up', you can run it as a live-cd to see if it detects all your hardware, connects to your network, etc, and then if you decide you want to, you can install. there are other linux distro live cds available, check out some linux forums or google for a list. there is also 'tons' of alternative software available, i dont think you will want for anything!

goodluck whatever you choose,

#4 Walkman

Walkman
  • Topic Starter

  • Banned
  • 1,327 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:01:37 PM

Posted 01 November 2006 - 03:01 PM

Thanks for the replies Trio3b and rubiconeye. They are some eye-openers. I'm still staring at my box, waiting for the correct moment to go.

Rubiconeye, I've been on ubuntu's web site, and they seem to be rockin. I liked their presentation of what a person could have an do with their software. I gotta admit, whenever I see these posts where people screenshot their desktops, I get so upset knowing I'm using Windows. Boorrringgg. Some of those desktops just put my mind into a different world. I'm looking at them, just thinking about all the fun and relaxation you all must have. Those desktops are all awesome. I couldn't come close to that with what I have. And then all the programs that can lay on the desktop makes it even better.

The ubuntu can be catered to any way a person wants, and absolutely no restrictions at all,, and especially you wants and needs. I really liked that site. But I am just wondering how stable are they, seeming like they've been around for maybe a year now? They said they have over 10,000 softwares,, so I'm sure whatever I need, they'll have it.

Trio3b, I should have been clearer about question no#3. What I meant was, if I'm using windows software, will they still work for me when I change OS's?. An example would be like any windows software I've downloaded and used on my computer, although I never saw a Linux/Unix requirement or compatibility, could I simple use it on the Unix/Linux systems?

But I'm downloading some of the OS's right now, and I'll run the cd's of them and take them for a test run, just to get the feel of it.

One more question.... If I download a package to use for a server, am I able to still run a desktop with applications too on it?. I guess that's one of my big concerns. If I can, I'm in like Flynn.


Thanks for all of your inputs. And don't sweat it,, I'm reading up on web sites too. It's just that there is so much information out there, it's like everything is purposed to be the same, but the names are different. That's where I'll need to decide. Which will do what or not.

I'm going to look and see if there is a comparison chart of those programs somewhere.

Thanks for the replies.

#5 Trio3b

Trio3b

  • Members
  • 95 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:11:37 AM

Posted 19 November 2006 - 03:54 AM

Sorry, got hung up - could not reply . In order to run Windows software on linux you must use a "virtual interface" such as codeweavers or the WINE project. In my experience, it is better to migrate everything over to linux apps, and there are only two or three windows apps that are ABSOLUTELY necessary in business critical situations and those are Adobe Photoshop or another typesetting software (can't remember the name) and Autocad. Remember, unless you own a newspaper or professional printshop or are an architect or engineering firm, the opensource alternatives of OpenOffice, GIMP and Qcad will take care of 95% of all your needs.

I have migrated my rental business to Linux for two years now.

MS Office -> OpenOffice 2.0.2 - business letters, faxes, invoicing, purchase orders, letters, labels
Paperport -> Xsane - for document scanning and management
IE 6.0 -> Mozilla-Firefox - internet
Roxio or Nero -> K3b for archiving and backup- file cd burning
Windows desktop -> KDE desktop for point n click
Windows Explorer -> Koqueror or Krusader - file management

Also :
CUPS - printing
Adobe reader 7.0 for linux - pdf
Squid and Dansguardian for internet sharing and cache proxy and webfiltering
SSH - secure peer networking
Nvu - website design


Sorry, I use my PC for business so don't know too much about multilmedia.
Totem, Kaffiene, mplayer, Amarok, Audacity, KsCD are available for entertainment.

BTW, I have never had much luck with Fedora Core, but just for grins downloaded BLAG this weekend. It is based on FC5 but is pared down to 1 CD instead of the FC5 multi-CD boat anchor. I don't like GNOME, but to be fair will [play with it for a week or so, but so far seems well layed out and more intuitive than FC5.

good luck

Edited by Trio3b, 19 November 2006 - 03:57 AM.


#6 Walkman

Walkman
  • Topic Starter

  • Banned
  • 1,327 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:01:37 PM

Posted 20 November 2006 - 12:03 AM

Hello Trio3b,

You know what?.... I like your post/reply.. It's helps me make a better decision of what I need and want to do. You explained alot of what I wanted and need to know in that reply. I hope you understand. I've been Windows since '90+.

It so ironic, but I've decided not to go with the Fedora, but I've downloaded the Utunbu desktop & the server version. I guess that's the thing that confuses me with the Unix/Linux systems... and that's... there are many flavors of them. What have you heard or are you familiar with the Ubuntu?

Also, over this weekend, I've bought a Dell computer, and I've done some work for someone and he gave me 2 computers (right now,, all I see is spare parts),,,, but it was worth it to me. I'm good with computers and what he wanted done only took me less than an hour. But it took longer because I just had to show him FREE software he aught to be using, especially, especially, since he's giving the computer to his children. We all know what they'll do online... get caught out there. If grown folks do it,, the children will. No question about it.

Anyway...... I have a few more hd's added to my collection (yeaaaahhhhh!!) but I'm going to add on 2 different hd's.. a Unix/Linux server on one,,, and a Unix/Linux desktop version on the other. I'll put them to the test. But I'm really ready and willing to leave Windows alone, ,, although I'll still use them and work with them. But I'll be like you in 2 years or so,, posting back on this site,,, telling how much of a difference it means to me. Actually it won't take me that long to learn it well enough (hopefully).

Again.. I thank you... and I thank all who have replied to this thread. When it comes to the Unix/Linux, I'll admit it.. I know very little (if that) about them.... but now I'm ready.




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users