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Mobo Question


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#1 Jorygifford

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Posted 27 October 2006 - 12:28 PM

Ok so I'm planning to build a computer. But i never have before and don't know a whole lot. So this may be a stupid question but mobos have 2 chipsets, if the processor goes on one, whats the other for? Can you have two processors?

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#2 Mr Alpha

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Posted 27 October 2006 - 01:41 PM

Well, to start with, the processor does not go on a chipset. The processor connects (via either FSB or HyperTransport) to one chipset, the Northbridge, which in turn connects to the memory, possible to a graphics card and to the other chipset, the Southbridge. On Intel motherboards the Northbridge contains a memory controller (which controls devices access to the memory), while on AMD motherboard the memory controller is integrated into the processor. The Northbridge may also contain integrated graphics. There are some chipset, mainly found in workstation or server situations, which can connect to more than one processor.

The Southbridge is the main communications hub of the motherboard. It connects and controls the communication to every port and other chipset on the motherboard. It connects to for example: IDE ports (for hard-drives and optical drives), SATA ports (which are replacing IDE ports), older serial and parallel ports (which connect to peripherals), USB and Firewire (which are replacing the older serial and parallel ports) and ethernet port (for networking). It also connects to other minor chipsets you might find on a motherboard which adds functionality (like extra SATA or ethernet ports).

On some motherboards, generally cheaper ones, the Northbridge and Southbridge may be integrated into each other, and so being a so-called one chipset solution
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#3 Jorygifford

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Posted 27 October 2006 - 03:28 PM

ha i have alot to learn still huh?

#4 protozero

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Posted 27 October 2006 - 05:28 PM

ha i have alot to learn still huh?


Don't worry, if you're interested in computers and want to learn more. Just google stuff, and that wasn't a stupid question.

You'll pick up things here and there.
Programming today is a race between software engineers striving to build bigger and better idiot-proof programs, and the Universe trying to produce bigger and better idiots. So far, the Universe is winning.

#5 Jorygifford

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Posted 28 October 2006 - 04:53 AM

Thats what i have been doing and im hoping this site will help too. Thanks alot for your support! :thumbsup:

#6 Mr Alpha

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Posted 28 October 2006 - 07:15 AM

The good thing is that you don't need to know all that to build a computer. Although doing careful research before trying is a good idea. This I learned the hard way. :thumbsup:
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#7 Jorygifford

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Posted 29 October 2006 - 05:59 AM

yeah there is more compatability issues then i had expected. Really have to be carefull.

#8 usasma

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Posted 29 October 2006 - 09:34 AM

When selecting a system, you'll need to have preferences established (such as I like Intel CPU's and nVidia video cards) and an intended useage pattern for the system (gaming, work, work with some gaming, etc).

Then you'll have to pick a chipset for the mobo - keeping your preferences in mind.

Then you can get down to selecting a mobo.

After that, it's a matter of checking the compatibility of the components - not only with the other components, but also with the Microsoft HCL (if you're looking for stability).
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#9 Jorygifford

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Posted 30 October 2006 - 06:58 AM

Can you steer me in a good direction for a good gaming rig? im thinking AMD, is there a difference between AGP and PCI slots??

#10 usasma

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Posted 30 October 2006 - 11:31 AM

Wow, you've done opened up the whole can of worms now! 3 more things to consider: 1) What's your budget?, 2) Will you build this yourself or buy a ready-built system?, and 3) What do you expect the lifespan of this system to be?

Gaming - currently the Intel Core 2 Duo is the champ, beating the pants off of AMD. But not too long ago the tables were turned and an AMD would easily whomp an Intel.

There's a difference between PCI, AGP, and PCIe (PCI Express). PCI (for video) has been at a standstill for a long time. AGP has just reached a standstill (for video) and they're just not making any more powerful cards. So PCIe is the way to go.

But all of this is a balancing act. If you've got a good processor, you can "cripple" it's performance with a poor video card, not enough RAM, etc. And the same thing works for the other aspects.

Why don't you take a look at these 3 systems that this website recommends (these are build it yourself systems): http://arstechnica.com/guides/buyer/system-guide-200608.ars
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- John  (my website: http://www.carrona.org/ )**If you need a more detailed explanation, please ask for it. I have the Knack. **  If I haven't replied in 48 hours, please send me a message. My eye problems have recently increased and I'm having difficult reading posts. (23 Nov 2017)FYI - I am completely blind in the right eye and ~30% blind in the left eye.<p>If the eye problems get worse suddenly, I may not be able to respond.If that's the case and help is needed, please PM a staff member for assistance.

#11 Jorygifford

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Posted 30 October 2006 - 10:16 PM

Well hopefully ill have about a grand to spend. I was thinking of purchasing the parts from newegg then putting everything together myself. Mostly for the learning experience, but then again i dont want to screw everything up either. What is Linux all about? I've heard of it but never really looked into it.

#12 usasma

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Posted 31 October 2006 - 09:47 AM

Take a look at the link in my last post - the "Hot Rod" will run just a bit over $1000 (it was about $1600 in August) as prices drop.

Things to consider when assembling a PC:
1) Read the manuals - they'll teach you a lot
2) Always check to ensure that what you're getting is compatible with what you've already got.
3) Always, always ground yourself (and unplug the system) before messing around in the case
4) Double check all your connections - and then figure that at least one will foul up on you anyway!

PC's are very easy to build once you've got the proper parts - and as long as you take care when assembling them they usually work well (don't forget, one of the parts might be DOA - and that'll have you pulling your hair out!). Just remember, a sledge hammer is not an appropriate tool for PC assembly - no matter how attractive it may seem at the time! :thumbsup: Good luck!

Oh, and Linux....

Linux is an operating system - like Windows. It forms the basis for everything that runs on your system. It provides links between the software and the hardware (so your printer prints what you want it to, etc).

Linux has many advantages over Windows - generally it's more stable and it's free. BUT, it's more difficult to learn and does not support as much as Windows does.

If you're interested in it, you may want to explore dual-booting with Windows and Linux. That way you can experiment with the Linux and still use Windows when you need it.
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- John  (my website: http://www.carrona.org/ )**If you need a more detailed explanation, please ask for it. I have the Knack. **  If I haven't replied in 48 hours, please send me a message. My eye problems have recently increased and I'm having difficult reading posts. (23 Nov 2017)FYI - I am completely blind in the right eye and ~30% blind in the left eye.<p>If the eye problems get worse suddenly, I may not be able to respond.If that's the case and help is needed, please PM a staff member for assistance.

#13 Enthusiast

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Posted 02 November 2006 - 11:16 PM

One thing to consider is a barebones kit, so you know that the components that come in the kit are compliant.

Here's one that looks pretty good, but there are many others and other places (like newegg) to get them.

http://www.tigerdirect.com/applications/Se...8&CatId=333




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