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Internet speed


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4 replies to this topic

#1 digorok

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Posted 03 December 2018 - 09:29 PM

I have DSL with Hawaiian telcom.

At least I think it's still them.

My download is 3.55Mbps. By Speedtest by Ookla

Paying for 7.0 Mbps

I remember it being higher.

Should I call them to check it????



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#2 Bry89

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Posted 04 December 2018 - 03:18 AM

You could, but good luck getting an answer from ISPs in general. Or maybe, your speeds have been throttled for some reason. I know ISPs are very guilty of doing this to their customers.


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#3 britechguy

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Posted 04 December 2018 - 09:55 AM

I have yet to see an ISP deliver anything close to their advertised speeds.  In most cases, if you look very carefully at the contracts, they read "up to" that advertised maximum.

 

I understand that hitting theoretical maximums is just not going to happen.  But the discrepancy between that advertised theoretical maximum and what's actually delivered is often very significant.

 

The DSL speed you report is very similar to what I get from Verizon.  My mobile hotspot feature on my T-Mobile smartphones at home typically gets quadruple that speed, and I live in a "bad part of town" for the 4G LTE signal.  If I'm at one friend's place I get around 70 Mbps on the phone.


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#4 digorok

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Posted 07 December 2018 - 01:32 AM

Funny how they can lie to the public, and we just accept it.

Maybe we should pay them half of what the charger, and tell them it's for half of the service.



#5 buddy215

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Posted 07 December 2018 - 01:35 PM

DSL download speed is totally dependent on distance from the telephone company's servers and the number of customers on

the same branch as you. You would have to be within a very short distance (inside their building :)) to get the max and around 3 miles away you would

get nothing.

 

Cable is much better at giving you the speeds you pay for.

 

EDIT: More info at How Does DSL Work and What Determines Its Speed?


Edited by buddy215, 07 December 2018 - 01:38 PM.

“Every atom in your body came from a star that exploded and the atoms in your left hand probably came from a different star than your right hand. It really is the most poetic thing I know about physics...you are all stardust.”Lawrence M. Krauss
A 1792 U.S. penny, designed in part by Thomas Jefferson and George Washington, reads “Liberty Parent of Science & Industry.”




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