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"You have been hacked" email


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#1 digorok

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Posted 07 November 2018 - 02:03 PM

Win 10

Firefox

yahoo mail

Avira free

 

 

Today I got an email telling me I have been hacked.

I didn't open it. Just deleted it.

Ran a scan, and it didn't find anything.

Scam or should I do something else to check???? 



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#2 null__

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Posted 07 November 2018 - 02:13 PM

Scam



#3 buddy215

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Posted 07 November 2018 - 02:21 PM

It is possible that the email would of been similar to what is reported in the article linked below.

 

  New Sextortion Scam Pretends to Come from Your Hacked Email Account

 

QUOTE A BIT:

Sextortion scams are when an attacker sends emails to people stating that their computer is hacked and that the attackers have been recording the screen and webcam as the user visits adult sites. The scammers then blackmail the recipients by stating they will release the videos if they do not receive a payment in bitcoins.

In the past, the sextortion emails would just include a target's password that the attackers found from a data breach dump in order to scare the victim into thinking that the threats were real. Now the scammers are also pretending to have access to the target's email account by spoofing the sender of the scam email to be the same email as the victim.

 

I would check further based on what Norton found. Scan using Malwarebytes , AdwCleaner and Free Virus Scan | Online Virus Scan from ESET | ESET

 

I would certainly change passwords for any websites associated with purchases or banking. No way of knowing which website(s) was

hacked that your email address and password was stolen from.


“Every atom in your body came from a star that exploded and the atoms in your left hand probably came from a different star than your right hand. It really is the most poetic thing I know about physics...you are all stardust.”Lawrence M. Krauss
A 1792 U.S. penny, designed in part by Thomas Jefferson and George Washington, reads “Liberty Parent of Science & Industry.”

#4 britechguy

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Posted 07 November 2018 - 02:25 PM

 No way of knowing which website(s) was hacked that your email address and password was stolen from.

 

Not that I don't think your advice with regard to changing passwords is incorrect, as it's a "better safe than sorry" situation.

 

I will, however, say that most of these scams are just that, scams, and nothing has really been hacked.  Email addresses are in no meaningful way private and can be culled from a multitude of sources.


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#5 compbuff

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Posted 07 November 2018 - 03:09 PM

Your email was spoofed from someone pretending to have hacked in your email to try and scam you. You can check this from the email header to see where the actual recipient of the email came from and even an IP address which will tell you roughly where it originated from. It's very easy to check by googling how to find out the recipient of a spoofed email for yahoo mail. No need for any cause for alarm. Your account was not hacked, and it's not really necessary to change your password; if it was hacked, you could be sure a real hacker would have by now changed your password and you would not get in, and then any private details in there would be at risk. However, you could change it if it makes you feel better.

 

However, I would preferably would use two-step verification if it is your main email account. That way they can't get in your email without the code you enter from your phone. 


Edited by compbuff, 07 November 2018 - 03:14 PM.


#6 digorok

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Posted 08 November 2018 - 06:10 PM

I kind of had a feeling it was a scam.

I never open any mail if I don't know who it is.

Even then, I look at the subject first.

Thanks






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