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Power supply died, now BSOD :/


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#1 theTastyCat

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Posted 08 October 2018 - 10:02 PM

Hey all - older Optiplex 755 running XP with no internet, just recording security camera footage. Power-cycled it and it wouldn't power back on. Replaced the power supply and it does power on, but just after it powers back on it BSODs. I put Windows Recovery on a CD so I could chkdsk, and though it will boot from the CD and says "Starting Windows" and seems to load all the good stuff but then BSODs before I get to the options to chkdsk/repair.

Is it safe to assume that part of the mobo blew up as the dying power supply's parting gift to the system?

Thanks very much, all!

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#2 hamluis

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Posted 09 October 2018 - 05:46 AM

I also have an Optiplex 755 (use as my Win 7 backup system).

 

Have you tried running the Dell hardware diagnostics?

 

What is the BSOD error message?

 

Louis



#3 joseibarra

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Posted 09 October 2018 - 07:53 AM

If you are getting a BSOD is there some reason you are not telling us what it says?

 

If your system restarts before you can see the BSOD after powering up begin tapping the F8 key until you get to the Advanced Boot Options menu and choose:

 

Disable automatic restart on system failure

 

Then post these details:

 

Attached File  bsod.jpg   142.61KB   0 downloads

 

If you miss the F8 Advanced Boot option menu window of opportunity try again.

 

Is the CD you have a genuine bootable Windows XP SP3 installation CD or something else you will describe?

 

Tell us how you did this:

 

put Windows Recovery on a CD 


Edited by joseibarra, 09 October 2018 - 07:55 AM.

The mediocre teacher tells. The good teacher explains. The superior teacher demonstrates.


#4 theTastyCat

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Posted 09 October 2018 - 01:24 PM

Sure thing.  Sorry - should have thought to include that.

 

My BSOD is missing the "driver" line - goes right from "...shut down to prevent damage to your computer." to "If this is the first time you've seen this...".

 

Here's the technical information:

 

*** STOP:  0x0000007B (0xB84C3524, 0xC0000034, 0x00000000, 0x00000000)

 

I've also got a pic of the BSOD if that would be any help.

 

Of course after literally searching for hours I couldn't find my windows install disks, so I followed the advice here http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/id-2078797/free-recovery-console-iso.html and downloaded a 7.4MB disc image and burned it to CD; it of course doesn't actually have XP on it, but it's supposed to allow one to run CHKDSK, but mine wouldn't even go that far.  I was pleasantly surprised how cheap XP discs are going for online; it wouldn't be the end of the world for me to buy another windows CD and try recovery, though I've already got my valid, legal product key on a sticker on the case.  Embarrassed to say I don't even remember which version of XP I was running - 32/64 home/pro!!

 

Hamluis, I'd love to run Dell diagnostics but I'm not sure exactly what that is - I assumed anything brand-specific would only come into play after Windows actually loads - but if I can get into it earlier, of course I'd like to!  Thanks for your patience.



#5 joseibarra

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Posted 09 October 2018 - 10:51 PM

That error message is not consistent with file system corruption or of a need to run a chkdsk and from that link the best thing to have to fix XP problems is a Hiren's Boot CD, but we don't know which of those things you downloaded or what "wouldn't even go that far" means.

 

That STOP error of 0x0000007B where the second parameter is 0x00000034 and the third and fourth parameters are 0x00000000 is consistent with a misconfigured BIOS where Windows is unable to understand the interface to the hard drive.  Sometimes the top of the BSOD will say INACCESSIBLE_BOOT_DEVICE - does yours?

 

Tell us this:

 

What is your system make and model or is it something assembled from separately purchased components?
 
If the system is a Dell what is the Service Tag Number?
If the system is an HP what is the serial number?
If the system is an Toshiba what is the serial number?
If the system is an Lenovo what is the serial number?
 
It sounds like when the system did not have power the BIOS lost it's configuration setting of how the motherboard hardware should communicate with the hard drive.  It could be that the CMOS battery on the motherboard needs to be replaced as they might last and be able to retain settings without power for about 3-5 years.  Sometimes is will look like Windows is starting and then you will see that STOP error.
 
What you need to do is adjust the BIOS settings to the proper interface settings and that may take some experimenting.
 
You should get into the system BIOS and before making any adjustments make written notes about what the current settings are so you can always go back to the original settings in case something goes wrong or things get worse.
 
Depending on your make and model I may have examples of specifics for some systems but I have accumulated a a list of of potential adjustments to make so you might need to do a little experimenting to find the right one for your system.
 
Here are some copy/paste ideas:
 
It sounds like you need to enter the BIOS on your system by pressing the "Del", F2, F10 or F12 key (whatever key is right for your system), locate the section where the hard disks types and hard disk interfaces are configured and temporarily change the setting so the Windows is able to find the hard disk.
 
Where to find the adjustment and how to change it depends on your system manufacturer and BIOS version so you may end up having to just look around for it and do a little experimenting.  If you know your system make and model, we can probably help you find a manual.
 
You need to locate and change the interface mode for your primary hard disk in the BIOS so that when the Windows Setup loads, it will be able to locate the hard disk. 
 
Before making any adjustments, you should make a note of what the current BIOS settings are so you can change them back when you are finished.
 
The adjustment varies so here are some examples I have accumulated:
 
The adjustment is made in the BIOS and could be under Integrated Peripherals, SATA Device Configuration, SATA Mode or something similar.
 
Make a note of what the current settings are before making any changes so you can change them back when you get done or if things get worse.
 
After you make the changes, save them and see how things look.  You may have to experiment with a few things to get it to behave.
 
If you find the mode is set to RAID/SATA mode, change the mode to IDE.
 
If you find the mode is set to SATA, change the mode to IDE.
(Acer Aspire)
 
If you find the mode is set to SATA, disable SATA mode.
 
If you find the mode is set to AHCI, change the mode to ATA.
 
If you find the mode is set to AHCI Emulation Mode, change the mode to IDE Emulation.
 
If you find the mode is set to SATA, disable SATA mode and/or change the mode to ATA.
 
If you find the mode is set to SATA Native Mode, disable SATA Native Mode.
 
If you find the mode is set to RAID/Autodetect AHCI, change the mode to Combination.
 
If you find the mode is set to RAID Auto/AHCI, change it to RAID Auto/ATA (this was a Dell XPS 420)
 
On some system of unknown make and model, In the Integrated Peripherals menu, disable" On Chip IDE Channel 0 
 
On an Acer Aspire 4720Z the mode needed to be changed from "AHCI Mode" to "IDE Mode"
 
The WWW says this works on some Dells:  "I had to set my SATA Operation to ATA instead of AHCI"
 
After making the adjustments, ACCEPT and SAVE the changes, and restart the system and see if it will now boot on the installation or Recovery Console CD.
 
Here are some additional ideas about changing the BIOS to recognize the SATA drive to boot from CD:
 

Edited by joseibarra, 09 October 2018 - 10:52 PM.

The mediocre teacher tells. The good teacher explains. The superior teacher demonstrates.


#6 theTastyCat

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Posted 10 October 2018 - 10:37 AM

Jose, this is awesome!!! Thank you so much. Will try as soon as I'm home. It would be GREAT if it was just BIOS stuff. I did replace the battery before anything else on the off chance it would be a 2 dollar fix! So might well just need some resetting.

#7 ranchhand_

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Posted 11 October 2018 - 12:34 PM

Try first, in order:

>  Try to boot into Safe Mode; if the problem is a corrupted peripheral driver you will be able to boot XP

>  Last Known Good Configuration (tap F8 on boot)
>  System Restore from the last restore point before this problem occurred

>  Use your XP System Disk and do a repair reinstall, 80% of the time that does the trick

>  Hirens Boot Disk: boot it and choose "Boot Computer" (some such wording near the top of the options list, you will see it).

IF your problem is a corrupted MBR, or corrupted system file, that should help.


Help Requests: If there is no reply after 3 days I remove the thread from my answer list. For further help PM me.


#8 theTastyCat

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Posted 11 October 2018 - 10:53 PM

JOSE!!!!!!

You, sir saved the day. The first BIOS change I made was SATA mode, and it WORKED - PC is up and running like a charm. I can't possibly thank you enough!!

Man, I'm just so happy!!

#9 joseibarra

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Posted 12 October 2018 - 12:22 AM

Good job.

 

You did all the work.

 

It is a fact that most XP users don't have a genuine bootable Windows XP SP3 installation CD (never got one, lost it, the dog ate it, etc.) so it doesn't make sense to suggest booting on that without first being sure one is available - or if the system does not have a working CD/DVD drive (some systems don't).  Those suggestions might work on some systems some of the time maybe but it would be better to have suggestions that are going to work on all systems all the time - and suggestions that do not begin with the word "try".

 

For the future it would behoove you to create a Hiren's Boot CD and from that you can fix lot's of problems and you will not have many of the restrictions that are present when booting into the XP Recovery Console.

 

To make one go to this link:

 

https://www.hirensbootcd.org/old-versions/

 

Download and extract this ZIP file:

 

Attached File  Untitled.jpg   37.84KB   0 downloads

 

You can't just copy/burn and ISO file to a device and make it bootable - you have to use a program that knows how to create a bootable media like a CD/DVD or USB thumb drive and there are free programs for that.

 

The free third party program called ImgBurn is popular for creating bootable media from the ISO file you are going to download.

 

The problem with some free third party programs is that during their installation they want to install other things (McAfee, Avira, Avast, etc.) and make adjustments to things like your browser home page and you don't want any of that.  Always pay attention during the installations and choose to Customize if you see that offered, uncheck anything you don't want.  Sometimes they change things around so pay attention...

 

Download ImgBurn from here:

 

http://www.imgburn.com/index.php?act=download

 

During the installation uncheck this box or anything that looks like it:

 

Attached File  1.jpg   66.49KB   0 downloads

 

Finally here is a tutorial about how to burn the ISO to a CD/DVD:

 

http://forum.imgburn.com/index.php?/topic/61-how-to-write-an-image-file-to-a-disc-using-imgburn/

 

When you are done you can uninstall ImgBurn.

 

If you want to make a bootable USB thumb drive I suggest Rufus for that and you can download it from here:

 

http://rufus.akeo.ie/

When you are done be sure your system can boot on the new media.


Edited by joseibarra, 12 October 2018 - 12:30 AM.

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