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Robo Caller: Your IP Address Has Been Compromised!


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#1 tommyguy

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Posted 08 October 2018 - 02:12 PM

Just a headsup.
 
I've been called about ten times today by a robo caller telling me my IP address has been compromised. It's a cheesy program, as the first few words are always cut off. (I only listened to it via speaker phone as the voicemail was being recorded.) It says something like, "...and your IP address has been compromised in several countries. It will be disconnected within forty-eight hours. To avoid this, and get a new IP address plus a free new router,  press one to be connected to a technician."
 
I learned via a Google search (and another forum) that people in the UK were getting these calls last April. (The voice had an American accent). I guess the scam has "crossed the pond," as they say in merry olde England. :tophat:

Edited by Al1000, 08 October 2018 - 02:27 PM.
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#2 britechguy

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Posted 08 October 2018 - 04:37 PM

The warning is appreciated, though I would hope these days that more and more people recognize that "cold calls" telling you that anything in your home has "been compromised" in any way that does not come directly from a company you do business with, is definitely a scam.  If it does come from someone claiming to be from a company you do business with, thank them, terminate the call, and call the company in question to verify (or report someone trying a scam using their name).


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

     . . . the presumption of innocence, while essential in the legal realm, does not mean the elimination of common sense outside it.  The willing suspension of disbelief has its limits, or should.

    ~ Ruth Marcus,  November 10, 2017, in Washington Post article, Bannon is right: It’s no coincidence The Post broke the Moore story


 

 

 

              

 


#3 tommyguy

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Posted 08 October 2018 - 04:48 PM

Thanks. Unfortunately, they don't identify the 'company' they are with and our caller ID displays our own phone number.

 

Btw, on the UK forum I mentioned in my previous message, one of the posters said he would have liked to have asked them, "How did you match up my IP address with my phone number?"


Edited by tommyguy, 08 October 2018 - 04:53 PM.


#4 britechguy

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Posted 08 October 2018 - 05:55 PM

Well, since it is an impossibility for caller id to be legitimate if it's showing a call as originating from the same number as the caller is on, that's a HUGE red flag right there.

 

I have caller ID and have had two calls that appeared to be originating from my own number.  That was a very good, and simple, reason not to answer.

 

Scams have tells.  Some more obvious than others.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

     . . . the presumption of innocence, while essential in the legal realm, does not mean the elimination of common sense outside it.  The willing suspension of disbelief has its limits, or should.

    ~ Ruth Marcus,  November 10, 2017, in Washington Post article, Bannon is right: It’s no coincidence The Post broke the Moore story


 

 

 

              

 


#5 Chris Cosgrove

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Posted 08 October 2018 - 06:16 PM

Most of these scams would be funny, even hilarious, except for the fact that people keep falling for them. An elderly acquaintance of mine got taken for about £1500 after he gave somebody remote access to his computer and there was a report on the BBC web-site yesterday about a pensioner in SW Scotland being conned out of £38,000. This one apparently was a phone scam as well, similar to the ones referred to above.

 

This is why these calls take place - because enough people fall for them to make them profitable to the criminals who make them.

 

Chris Cosgrove


I am going to be away until about the 22nd October. Time on-line will be reduced and my internet access may be limited. PMs may not be replied to as quickly as normal !


#6 tommyguy

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Posted 08 October 2018 - 06:41 PM

...

 

This is why these calls take place - because enough people fall for them to make them profitable to the criminals who make them.

 

Chris Cosgrove

 Sad but very true. :(



#7 Grinler

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Posted 08 October 2018 - 07:25 PM

Most of the complaints I have seen for this were in the UK and Australia. Wonder if they are making their way to the states now.

 

 

tommyguy, did you get their number by any chance?



#8 tommyguy

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Posted 09 October 2018 - 05:46 AM

We weren't able to get their number and they provided no ID. On our caller ID the number displayed was ours.



#9 Replicator

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Posted 09 October 2018 - 07:52 AM

Well the first alarms ring loud when they say, "To avoid this, and get a new IP address plus a free new router,  press one to be connected to a technician."

 

Your Router gives your NIC an IP addy under DHCP.

 

Hang up or severe connection :apple:


The quieter you become, the more you are able to hear!
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#10 Shazy

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Posted 12 October 2018 - 12:20 AM

We have spammers of our own. last month my dad got a phone from an unknown number pretending to be a govt official who wan to inquire about his banking details. Luckily there was  very less amount in the bank so not much harm was done.



#11 georgehenry

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Posted 14 October 2018 - 01:22 AM

British Telecom have a system to prevent repeats of these scammers messages. Immediately after receiving one, dial 1572 this will enable you to put the number that last called you into a junk file. It can't be done if the number that called you is "unavailable" but I don't answer those anyway. I have reduced my nuisance calls a lot.



#12 tommyguy

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Posted 14 October 2018 - 05:29 AM

I don't answer 'number unavailable' calls either (except in this case the number being displayed was our number), but they still go to voicemail. Our phone plays the voicemail as it's being recorded so we can hear it. In the U.S. it is usually illegal for a caller to modify the system so caller ID displays a number other than the one the call is actually originating from. This is called "Caller ID spoofing." Below is a quote from the Federal Communications Commission's website

 

Under the Truth in Caller ID Act, FCC rules prohibit anyone from transmitting misleading or inaccurate caller ID information with the intent to defraud, cause harm or wrongly obtain anything of value. Anyone who is illegally spoofing can face penalties of up to $10,000 for each violation. Link

 

 

Obviously it is a difficult crime to trace and the FCC does not have the resources to investigate individual cases.






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