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Partitioning an hard drive with GParted to dual boot two Linux distro's?


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#1 defurman

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Posted 16 September 2018 - 07:30 AM

I have just bought a 3.5, 2TB to SATA hard drive. I would like help and advice so that i could partition this hard drive and then install a different Linux distro on each partition. Would it then be possible to select which distro to use at boot-up? Any help and advice would be really appreciated. Thanks all


Edited by hamluis, 16 September 2018 - 07:53 AM.
Moved from Internal Hardware to Linux - Hamluis.


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#2 Al1000

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Posted 16 September 2018 - 11:14 AM

Hi,

This can all be easily done.

Will this be the only hard drive in this computer?

Does the computer support UEFI? (If you do not know, which version of Windows did it come with?)

#3 defurman

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Posted 17 September 2018 - 01:18 AM

Hello Al1000

 

Yes, this will be the only hard drive in the computer to begin with.

 

The computer does support UEFI.

 

The computer does have a 1TB hard drive already in it.

 

I think learning how to correctly partition my 2TB hard drive with GParted in order to run different operating systems is my main goal for the time being.

 

Then i would like to learn (if possible) how to have multiple hard drives in my computer and being able to select

which one to use when booting-up the PC.

 

Big thanks for any and all help



#4 Al1000

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Posted 17 September 2018 - 11:33 AM

I think learning how to correctly partition my 2TB hard drive with GParted in order to run different operating systems is my main goal for the time being.


Great. Instructions are here:
https://gparted.org/display-doc.php%3Fname%3Dhelp-manual

Then i would like to learn (if possible) how to have multiple hard drives in my computer and being able to select which one to use when booting-up the PC.


Ordinarily the bootloader would be installed to one hard drive, therefore that would be the hard drive that the computer would use when booting up.

If you wanted to be able to boot from multiple hard drives, you would need to install a bootloader on each one.

#5 defurman

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Posted 18 September 2018 - 10:56 AM

Hi Al1000

 

Big thanks for the excellent link in your reply regarding GParted.

Think i'll find somewhere quiet and have a good long read lol.

 

Cheers mate!



#6 Gary R

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Posted 19 September 2018 - 06:48 AM

You may also find this tutorial on GParted of interest .... https://www.dedoimedo.com/computers/gparted.html .... it's getting on a bit now, but it's still relevant.



#7 pcpunk

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Posted 20 September 2018 - 07:30 AM

I seldom use gparted when doing an install as you can do what you need while your are installing.  You'll partition the space you need for the current distro, then when you install the next you will do the same.  Although, you may want to make the Whole Drive Unallocated space from the current (I assume NTFS Formatted Drive). 


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#8 NickAu

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Posted 20 September 2018 - 11:08 PM

 

Then i would like to learn (if possible) how to have multiple hard drives in my computer and being able to select which one to use when booting-up the PC.

 

If you wanted to be able to boot from multiple hard drives, you would need to install a bootloader on each one.

Maybe not, Its amazing what you can do with grub,



#9 66Batmobile

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Posted 21 September 2018 - 08:17 AM

I seldom use gparted when doing an install as you can do what you need while your are installing.  You'll partition the space you need for the current distro, then when you install the next you will do the same.

Good point @pcpunk.

 

to the OP, what distros are you planning on running?  The answer to your question may depend on that too.  For example, if they're both going to be Ubuntu-based then the built in installer(s) should be able to handle it, unless there's something special needed because you're working with two drives...


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#10 defurman

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Posted 04 October 2018 - 09:47 AM

I am already running Linux Mint 19 and i would like to install openSUSE Leap 15 on a separate partition using GParted.



#11 pcpunk

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Posted 04 October 2018 - 10:26 AM

I've never installed Opensuse but we should start by looking at your partitions.  Please include the outcome of this Command in your next post.

sudo parted -l   

As I pointed out earlier you could have left space for another distro when you installed Mint, but I assume you did not.  And we should determine if you installed as MBR or GPT, which we will see with this command.

 

You should also consider that this operation is somewhat dangerous for the beginner, and you could lose all that you have at this time.  So backup everything first. 

 

Unless a member comes along that has worked with OpenSuse then it will be tricky.  The installer is quite different to what I'm used to in Mint.  Once we take a look at your partitions you may need to go to the Opensuse Forms to do this the best way.


Edited by pcpunk, 04 October 2018 - 10:32 AM.

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#12 pcpunk

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Posted 05 October 2018 - 07:43 AM

Before I go on I will say that this is a bit advanced for a beginner and you could ruin what you have now.  That being said if you like to play around and don't mind that, then take a look at this tutorial, it looks good for a beginner.

A Step By Step Guide To Installing openSUSE Linux

 

Once you post the Partition info we will see if you installed in GPT.

 

1. First we need some Free Space to install Opensuse if you haven't already, that you can do with Gparted, and you can use the OpenSuse disk if it has gparted included.

 

2. If you installed in MBR then you will want to create an "Extended" Partition first, inside the Free Space or Unallocated Space that you created in step one.  This is because you can only have Four Primary Partitions on an MBR Drive, and we may exceed that with a dual boot system.  It will also allow you to create more partitions later if needed.

 

3. If you installed in GPT, then you could just choose to install OpenSuse to the Unallocated Free Space that you created in step one.  OpenSuse should automatically create Root, Swap and Home Partitions for you.

 

4. Please also Read This if you are moving forward.

1.2 Minimal System Installation


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