Jump to content


 


Register a free account to unlock additional features at BleepingComputer.com
Welcome to BleepingComputer, a free community where people like yourself come together to discuss and learn how to use their computers. Using the site is easy and fun. As a guest, you can browse and view the various discussions in the forums, but can not create a new topic or reply to an existing one unless you are logged in. Other benefits of registering an account are subscribing to topics and forums, creating a blog, and having no ads shown anywhere on the site.


Click here to Register a free account now! or read our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Photo

Blank screen on old monitor after startup when connected to Windows 7 PC


  • Please log in to reply
9 replies to this topic

#1 alisp

alisp

  • Members
  • 95 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:12:22 AM

Posted 08 August 2018 - 11:53 AM

I was trying to do some work on a Windows 7 PC while keeping my main monitor on my work computer so that I could get on with my work, so I connected an old monitor which is about 10 years old and was originally provided for an XP machine to the Win 7 PC.  Win 7 starts up and I can see the Windows splash screen, but after that, there's nothing.  Is the screen simply too old to cope with even Win 7?  (What specs would I need to check to find out?)

 

The PC has HDMI and DisplayPort ports; the monitor has VGA and DVI (I think DVI-D, but can't be sure, because I can't read the embossing) ones.  I've connected the two using an HDMI cable and an HDMI to DVI adapter.  Ought that to work, or am I just barking up the wrong tree, and will I have to spend a day in the office at the weekend when I'm not using the main computer so I can borrow the more up-to-date monitor?  :(  

 

As ever, your thoughts and expertise would be very welcome :) 

 

 



BC AdBot (Login to Remove)

 


#2 OldPhil

OldPhil

    Doppleganger


  • Members
  • 4,164 posts
  • ONLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Long Island New York
  • Local time:07:22 PM

Posted 08 August 2018 - 12:13 PM

There is a chance it needs drivers, google the the makers site to see if drivers are available.


Honesty & Integrity Above All!


#3 alisp

alisp
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 95 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:12:22 AM

Posted 09 August 2018 - 11:27 AM

Thanks, OldPhil - it would never have occurred to me that a monitor would need drivers!  As a temporary measure I've lugged my laptop into the office to work on while I use my main screen with the Win 7, but any other thoughts would still be welcome. 



#4 Chris Cosgrove

Chris Cosgrove

  • Moderator
  • 7,015 posts
  • ONLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Scotland
  • Local time:12:22 AM

Posted 09 August 2018 - 05:30 PM

Here you go - DVi connectors !

 

Attached File  DVI-Connectors.jpg   367.24KB   1 downloads

 

This image should allow you to identify the DVI ports on the computer and the monitor. So long as they are the same you would be much better using a single DVI cable rather than an HDMI - DVI adapter.

 

I believe OldPhil was referring to the computer or its video card rather than the monitor. I too have never heard of a monitor needing drivers but, as always, I am willing to be corrected !

 

Chris Cosgrove



#5 OldPhil

OldPhil

    Doppleganger


  • Members
  • 4,164 posts
  • ONLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Long Island New York
  • Local time:07:22 PM

Posted 09 August 2018 - 08:08 PM

The only time I have seen drivers is for the OS never a monitor, Both my old Sony and my Samsung have a disk.  I have not bothered with the drivers on this machine, I think MS has many things covered with system drivers.


Honesty & Integrity Above All!


#6 Platypus

Platypus

  • Global Moderator
  • 15,222 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Australia
  • Local time:10:22 AM

Posted 10 August 2018 - 04:04 AM

HDMI and DVI use the same signalling protocol, so using an adapter to go from one to the other is usually fine. Monitors seldom require a genuine device driver ( a few odd ones do) but what is often referred to as the driver issued by manufacturers is a configuration file used by the video driver to understand the operating modes a monitor is capable of. Since it's possible the older monitor is not plug&play, it may just be receiving a signal of the wrong scan frequency or resolution. A workaround could be to set a low resolution screen manually in Windows (e.g. 1024x768 60Hz), which any monitor should be able to display. Or a Google search on the monitor's model number should let you find out what resolutions the monitor is capable of, and setting a suitable one before changing monitors should work.


Top 5 things that never get done:

1.

#7 alisp

alisp
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 95 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:12:22 AM

Posted 10 August 2018 - 04:47 AM


This image should allow you to identify the DVI ports on the computer and the monitor. So long as they are the same you would be much better using a single DVI cable rather than an HDMI - DVI adapter.

 

I believe OldPhil was referring to the computer or its video card rather than the monitor. I too have never heard of a monitor needing drivers but, as always, I am willing to be corrected !

 

DVD-D dual link, then - thanks, that's what I thought.  Unfortunately, there's no DVI port on the PC, which I thought was slightly odd: it's a real mixture of old and new, still with P/S2 connections for keyboard and mouse (even I got rid of my last P/S2 keyboard years ago because I couldn't find a computer that would take it!), then your nice, up-to-date HDMI and DisplayPort connections, but nothing in between, so to speak.  (And Dell still seem to be spec'ing them that way!) 

 

Aha.  It was one of those fancy monitors with loads of USB ports and so on on it, so I thought there might be a possibility.  Will see if the PC needs some drivers.

 

HDMI and DVI use the same signalling protocol, so using an adapter to go from one to the other is usually fine. Monitors seldom require a genuine device driver ( a few odd ones do) but what is often referred to as the driver issued by manufacturers is a configuration file used by the video driver to understand the operating modes a monitor is capable of. Since it's possible the older monitor is not plug&play, it may just be receiving a signal of the wrong scan frequency or resolution. A workaround could be to set a low resolution screen manually in Windows (e.g. 1024x768 60Hz), which any monitor should be able to display. Or a Google search on the monitor's model number should let you find out what resolutions the monitor is capable of, and setting a suitable one before changing monitors should work.

 

Thanks.  Yes, the resolution is currently very high, so possibly that is the problem.  I'll drop it down to something more primitive while I've got the modern monitor hooked up, and see if that makes a difference.



#8 alisp

alisp
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 95 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:12:22 AM

Posted 10 August 2018 - 12:47 PM

Okay, dropped it down to a much lower resolution, saw that a load of updating was quickly going on onscreen, but then it went blank again.  In fact, I realised that it had gone into amber "sleep" mode, but no amount of moving the mouse would make any difference.  I've just attached it to an old XP machine, and it's working normally on there.  :shrug:



#9 alisp

alisp
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 95 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:12:22 AM

Posted 14 August 2018 - 01:45 PM

Okay, just updated the monitor drivers while it was still attached to the XP machine, then attached it to the Win 7 and suddenly it works as I would have expected it to!  I'm guessing there must be some sort of link :) 



#10 Platypus

Platypus

  • Global Moderator
  • 15,222 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Australia
  • Local time:10:22 AM

Posted 16 August 2018 - 06:41 AM

That sounds unusual, but if as you say the monitor is a bit of a fancy model, it could have a configuration EEPROM which was updated. Something like that would be quite uncommon.

 

Thanks for getting back to us with the resolution (ha ha, bad pun...)


Top 5 things that never get done:

1.




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users