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My laptop needs


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#1 rp-57

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Posted 30 July 2018 - 03:46 PM

Hello,

Has been a long time to post here but I was hoping some one can shed some light on my question.

My laptop needs a new battery and I happen to have a asus laptop that has to be taken apart topside to install the battery any how I have done some research on what to do to install the battery and I ran across a article when working on electronics you should wear anti static gloves or use a anti static mat.   can anyone shed some light if you know how anything on my question to use anti static mats of gloves.

Thankyou and have a great day.



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#2 mikey11

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Posted 30 July 2018 - 04:52 PM

dont worry about it....i never have....and i have taken apart thousands of laptops


Edited by mikey11, 30 July 2018 - 04:53 PM.


#3 rp-57

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Posted 30 July 2018 - 09:52 PM

:thumbup2:



#4 rp88

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Posted 01 August 2018 - 06:38 PM

Static ESD can be a real threat to certain types of electronics, but the insides of consumer products are usually pretty toughened against it. If you ever work on something vulnerable to ESD you will want a wrist-strap which you can connect to a grounded point, you'd want to avoid wearing anything woolly (or synthetic fabrics with similar fibres) at the time and you'd want to use an anti-static mat (connected to a grounding point like the strap should be). I've opened laptops often and have never needed to worry about ESd when doing so, also I've done a fair bit of stuff with ESD sensitive electronics in laboratories and definitely never heard of anti-static gloves, most gloves such as latex or nylon will typically make static discharges MORE likely not less. With laptop innards, avoid touching the circuitry or pins of chips directly, don't wear wool and don't walk about on carpet beforehand, you can also try touching a large lump of metal (desk frame or such) at occasional intervals. make sure to carefully watch videos online for your EXACT model of device before opening it, if things seem tough never pull with all your force because you will have forgotten to remove a screw somewhere and you'll end up breaking things. Parts should separate with only very small force so long as you have correctly removed all screws. You probably want to remove labels and stickers too as they are often placed such that some screws are hidden under them.
Back on this site, for a while anyway, been so busy the last year.

My systems:2 laptops, intel i3 processors, windows 8.1 installed on the hard-drive and linux mint 17.3 MATE installed to USB

#5 rp-57

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Posted 04 August 2018 - 01:15 PM

Static ESD can be a real threat to certain types of electronics, but the insides of consumer products are usually pretty toughened against it. If you ever work on something vulnerable to ESD you will want a wrist-strap which you can connect to a grounded point, you'd want to avoid wearing anything woolly (or synthetic fabrics with similar fibres) at the time and you'd want to use an anti-static mat (connected to a grounding point like the strap should be). I've opened laptops often and have never needed to worry about ESd when doing so, also I've done a fair bit of stuff with ESD sensitive electronics in laboratories and definitely never heard of anti-static gloves, most gloves such as latex or nylon will typically make static discharges MORE likely not less. With laptop innards, avoid touching the circuitry or pins of chips directly, don't wear wool and don't walk about on carpet beforehand, you can also try touching a large lump of metal (desk frame or such) at occasional intervals. make sure to carefully watch videos online for your EXACT model of device before opening it, if things seem tough never pull with all your force because you will have forgotten to remove a screw somewhere and you'll end up breaking things. Parts should separate with only very small force so long as you have correctly removed all screws. You probably want to remove labels and stickers too as they are often placed such that some screws are hidden under them.

Ok this is great info and I have watched videos and all of them say to use a mat or a wrist strap.  So i'am still confused on to use anything.  Thanks for the info.



#6 rp88

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Posted 05 August 2018 - 11:31 AM

If you have a mat and wrist strap handy, use them, otherwise it shouldn't matter as long as you take a few precautions to avoid building up really huge amounts of static* and you avoid directly touching the leads of chips on circuit boards.

*touch grounded metal every so often, avoid carpet, don't wear any woolly items of clothing that build up static when rubbed, ensure you have shoes on over your socks... typically it is good to ground youself on a computer's casing but with a laptop there might not be a conductive casing about

wrist straps cost only a few £ online if you want one

Edited by rp88, 05 August 2018 - 11:32 AM.

Back on this site, for a while anyway, been so busy the last year.

My systems:2 laptops, intel i3 processors, windows 8.1 installed on the hard-drive and linux mint 17.3 MATE installed to USB

#7 rp-57

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Posted 09 August 2018 - 01:11 PM

If you have a mat and wrist strap handy, use them, otherwise it shouldn't matter as long as you take a few precautions to avoid building up really huge amounts of static* and you avoid directly touching the leads of chips on circuit boards.

*touch grounded metal every so often, avoid carpet, don't wear any woolly items of clothing that build up static when rubbed, ensure you have shoes on over your socks... typically it is good to ground youself on a computer's casing but with a laptop there might not be a conductive casing about

wrist straps cost only a few £ online if you want one

:thumbup2:






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