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An open letter to Microsoft management re: Windows updating


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#1 JohnC_21

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Posted 30 July 2018 - 09:53 AM

Enterprise patching veteran Susan Bradley summarizes her Windows update survey results, asking Microsoft management to rethink the breakneck pace of frequently destructive patches.

 

 

https://www.computerworld.com/article/3293440/microsoft-windows/an-open-letter-to-microsoft-management-re-windows-updating.html



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#2 Rocky Bennett

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Posted 30 July 2018 - 11:55 AM

Although I am an unabashed Microsoft fan-boy, this "open letter" seems reasonable and fair and I would endorse its main points.

 

Thanks for posting.

 

Rocky


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#3 britechguy

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Posted 30 July 2018 - 03:52 PM

It wouldn't matter what Microsoft did, there will be some who regard any update at any time with suspicion, warranted or not.

 

I also find some of her comments muddled.  I've seen far more issues, and far more consistently, with "Patch Tuesday" patches made (for the most part) secondary to the discovery of new attack surfaces that I ever have with the feature updates.   When Microsoft (or any other software maker) is "not fast enough" in addressing newly discovered attack surfaces they get pummeled for that, too.

 

I am not a Microsoft fan-boy by any stretch of the imagination, but given the number of decades I've been working with Windows in all its iterations I just don't see things as the author does, and at least partially I understand why.  Institutional IT departments absolutely, positively despise updates in general and most will resist them with all their strength regardless of their merits.  Anyone who has worked for a large, bureaucratic entity - be it in the private or public sector - will generally identify with what I just said.  As a result, most of these organizations are constantly running what amounts to obsolete or vulnerable systems.

 

Any large organization should have in place a way that they apply major updates much like an in-house version of the Windows Insider program.  You never "flash cut" your entire organization at one time under any circumstances.  Doing a properly phased rollout of any entity-wide update (not unlike Microsoft does with updates to Windows 10 Home and Pro) is how you correctly "shake out" updates.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

      Memory is a crazy woman that hoards rags and throws away food.

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#4 Chris Cosgrove

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Posted 30 July 2018 - 06:33 PM

 

Institutional IT departments absolutely, positively despise updates in general and most will resist them with all their strength

 

And this is why parts of the British health service and HMRC (the UK equivalent of the IRS + Customs) are still running XP in places. As for the banking system, here and elsewhere, I don't know how many different regulating authorities have pointed out that banking systems in general are heading for a nasty crash due to outdated hard and soft ware.

 

There is always, of course, a 'good' reason for this. 'If it ain't broke, don''t fix it', 'We can't get it into the budget this year, but we will do it next year . . . but next year's budget doesn't stretch either'. 'We have year's of experience with these systems . . . but the last engineer who really understands them retires in six months'. And so on.

 

It really isn't the entire fault of the orgaisational IT staff and IT engineers. Company boards tend to pay more attention to sales, production and accounting pressures than they do to IT engineers. But there is some evidence that there is a growing recognition that the risks of continuing in this manner are increasingly likely to seriously affect the bottom line.

 

Chris Cosgrove



#5 britechguy

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Posted 30 July 2018 - 07:52 PM

 

 

Institutional IT departments absolutely, positively despise updates in general and most will resist them with all their strength

 

And this is why parts of the British health service and HMRC (the UK equivalent of the IRS + Customs) are still running XP in places. As for the banking system, here and elsewhere, I don't know how many different regulating authorities have pointed out that banking systems in general are heading for a nasty crash due to outdated hard and soft ware.

.

.

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It really isn't the entire fault of the orgaisational IT staff and IT engineers. Company boards tend to pay more attention to sales, production and accounting pressures than they do to IT engineers. But there is some evidence that there is a growing recognition that the risks of continuing in this manner are increasingly likely to seriously affect the bottom line.

 

 

 

Chris,

 

         Oh, yes, there are certain systems (some related to the nuclear arsenal) that are still running on pre-XP era hardware and software.  From the perspective of "hackability" that does make them quite immune.  Of course, almost anything that is not connected to cyberspace is immune to hacking unless it's an "inside job."

 

          While I'll agree that it isn't entirely the fault of organizational IT departments that updates are not done, they are a huge PotP (Part of the Problem).  I have seen far to many cases where money is no object and time is no object and where the techs know, and know well, that, "If it ain't broke, don't fix it," is insanity when it comes to computer systems that they will still fight changing anything tooth and nail.  Whatever drives the attitude, it has no rational basis upon even cursory examination.  It used to infuriate me, and the idea of it still does.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

      Memory is a crazy woman that hoards rags and throws away food.

                    ~ Austin O'Malley

 

 

 

              

 





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