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How to get a free Win10 upgrade newly updated by Ed Bott


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#1 JohnC_21

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Posted 29 July 2018 - 09:10 PM

The big question now is whether Microsoft will ever turn off the code on its activation servers that dispenses digital licenses after an upgrade from an earlier Windows version. I’ve continued to test that scenario throughout 2018, and I can confirm as of late July 2018 that it still works.

 

https://www.askwoody.com/2018/how-to-get-a-free-win10-upgrade-newly-updated-by-ed-bott/



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#2 pcpunk

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Posted 02 August 2018 - 09:26 AM

Yeah, I've done it on a few machines lately also, W7 and W8.  Just enter the Product Key on Windows 7 and you all set, 8 all you have to do is install as usual and it will activate.  I also am of the opinion that Windows 7 will be usable for a long time past EOL.


Edited by pcpunk, 02 August 2018 - 09:30 AM.

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#3 techgeek88

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Posted 08 August 2018 - 07:29 PM

Unfortunately I don't have an old 7 or 8/8.1 Pro key so I'm going to have to pay the $100 upgrade through the Microsoft Store to upgrade my newest laptop running 10 Home. :( Oh well, it'll be worth it.

 

Hey if anyone has a Pro key they wouldn't mind giving me, PM me. ;)

 

Just kidding though, I'll buy one!  :P


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#4 JohnC_21

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Posted 08 August 2018 - 08:57 PM

Is the hard drive you are installing Windows 10 to have a Windows 7 or 8 OS? If Windows 7 you can pull the key with Produkey. If Windows 8 and the computer was an OEM like HP or Dell the key is embedded in firmware. 

 

https://www.nirsoft.net/utils/product_cd_key_viewer.html

 

If the Computer has Windows 7 or 8 currently installed you can upgrade to Windows using the Media Creation Tool as shown in the link I posted. Run the MCT and select "Upgrade this PC Now"


Edited by JohnC_21, 08 August 2018 - 08:59 PM.


#5 pcpunk

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Posted 09 August 2018 - 08:43 AM

 

to upgrade my newest laptop running 10 Home.

I was a little confused at first also John.  The OP is trying to get Pro and that's all.


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#6 Guest_Joe C_*

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Posted 09 August 2018 - 09:09 AM

Is the hard drive you are installing Windows 10 to have a Windows 7 or 8 OS? If Windows 7 you can pull the key with Produkey. If Windows 8 and the computer was an OEM like HP or Dell the key is embedded in firmware. 

 

https://www.nirsoft.net/utils/product_cd_key_viewer.html

 

Those keys that software like Product Key uses only gets the slic bios key, which is a default key that oem's use on a multiple amount of pc's and that key will not work to activate a new clean install of w10 (with no previous w10 versions before). You'll need the coa sticker key (coem) or a retail key from 7, 8, or 8.1.

I think the "upgrade" method still works if your upgrading from 7 or 8/8.1 to 10 on an existing pc


Edited by Joe C, 09 August 2018 - 09:13 AM.


#7 JohnC_21

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Posted 09 August 2018 - 09:10 AM

 

 

 

to upgrade my newest laptop running 10 Home.

I was a little confused at first also John.  The OP is trying to get Pro and that's all.

 

I missed that. Thanks. Personally, I wouldn't spend another 100 bucks to get Pro. Spending that much money to get targeted ads and Candy Crush along with a bunch of other bloat? No Thanks.



#8 JohnC_21

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Posted 09 August 2018 - 09:13 AM

 

Is the hard drive you are installing Windows 10 to have a Windows 7 or 8 OS? If Windows 7 you can pull the key with Produkey. If Windows 8 and the computer was an OEM like HP or Dell the key is embedded in firmware. 

 

https://www.nirsoft.net/utils/product_cd_key_viewer.html

 

Those keys that software like Product Key uses only gets the slic bios key, which is a default key that oem's use on a multiple amount of pc's and that key will not work to activate a new clean install of w10 (with no previous w10 versions before).

I am pretty sure this has been done with the SLIC keys but am not positive. I think pcpunk can confirm it. The reason I say this is because you can upgrade the OEM by running the MCT and selecting Upgrade this PC Now.

 

Edit: I did find this. I don't know if it's still valid as I refuse to install Windows 10 on any of my computers.

 

https://social.technet.microsoft.com/Forums/Windows/en-US/da8b4c47-db23-4178-920e-08c145b10938/activate-windows-10-using-windows-7-oem-key-is-it-legal?forum=win10itprogeneral


Edited by JohnC_21, 09 August 2018 - 09:20 AM.


#9 pcpunk

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Posted 09 August 2018 - 09:39 AM

Not sure either John, all I know is you can install both without issue.  W7 with the actual Product Key on the pc, and W8, I just do Clean Installs and let it activate automagically. 

 

And for me also, Pro is not worth 100.00+.  I surely don't need it but I'm sure some like to use Bitlocker, and there is better Update control as most of us know.  

 

Let's not get confused here, MS want's you and everyone else on windows 10, if they didn't they would not allow this process to exist...haha

 

I should reinstall W7 on the most recent pc I've done this with, and then see if W10 will reinstall and activate without entering the key, but, that probably won't happen lol?


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#10 britechguy

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Posted 09 August 2018 - 10:38 AM

What it comes down to is that anyone, and I mean anyone, who wishes to stay in the Windows ecosystem with a supported version of the OS is going to have to go to Windows 10.

 

No OS maker supports every single version of an OS they ever put out, and Microsoft is no different.

 

If you don't want to continue to be in the Windows ecosystem post-Windows 7 that's fine and dandy, but for those that do it's just plain bad advice to tell them to put off the inevitable, particularly since the window for a free upgrade clearly is not yet closed.

 

As for Windows 10 Pro, unless you need one of the features it has that Home does not I really don't see the point in getting it.  Some people have a specific need, but a lot are just used to having "Pro" versions of Windows and do it out of habit.  The end user experience is remarkably similar between the two, but that's been true in earlier Windows, too.


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#11 techgeek88

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Posted 10 August 2018 - 02:19 AM

Yes, sorry for the confusion. Ed recently put out an article about upgrading Home to Pro using a Pro key from an earlier version of Windows, and that's what I thought this was - my bad!

 

For me, it's RDP and Bitlocker that I'm after. I completely agree with Brian though that the experience/UI is not the reason to get Pro and that it is not needed by most even those who are professionals. Also I'm starting to do more and more with Windows Server in my own little lab and learning more, and I'd like to try joining it to a domain at some point.


Edited by techgeek88, 10 August 2018 - 02:21 AM.

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#12 britechguy

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Posted 10 August 2018 - 09:04 AM

@Techgeek88:  I have to say that I love your signature quote, which I will include again here in case it should be changed later:

 

"They might call it the cloud but it is, in fact, just someone else’s computer.”

                    - Mark Russinovich

 

It seems well-nigh impossible to get some people to understand that "the cloud" is nothing more than a massive collection of "someone else's computers" or "someone else's hard drive farms."

 

It's certainly convenient, it's pretty much entirely maintained in professional data centers (which have backup protocols far more stringent than most of us), but you are entrusting your data to an unknown third party or parties.   I do it all the time, but only for data that I have no concerns about when it comes to privacy or security.   It's not that I don't think that there are not good security measures in place in most data centers, either, but they're "big juicy targets" while my little laptop (and its external backup drive) out here in the middle of cyberspace nowhere are far less tempting targets and, in my opinion, are way less subject to have private data stolen as a result.  To my knowledge my personal computers have never been compromised, yet I was part of the Equifax and Anthem breaches, and you can be sure that those companies probably both use "the cloud" and may very well have hardware that makes up a component part of "the cloud" for others as well.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

     . . . the presumption of innocence, while essential in the legal realm, does not mean the elimination of common sense outside it.  The willing suspension of disbelief has its limits, or should.

    ~ Ruth Marcus,  November 10, 2017, in Washington Post article, Bannon is right: It’s no coincidence The Post broke the Moore story


 

 

 

              

 


#13 techgeek88

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Posted 10 August 2018 - 04:12 PM

@Techgeek88:  I have to say that I love your signature quote, which I will include again here in case it should be changed later:

 

"They might call it the cloud but it is, in fact, just someone else’s computer.”

                    - Mark Russinovich

 

It seems well-nigh impossible to get some people to understand that "the cloud" is nothing more than a massive collection of "someone else's computers" or "someone else's hard drive farms."

 

It's certainly convenient, it's pretty much entirely maintained in professional data centers (which have backup protocols far more stringent than most of us), but you are entrusting your data to an unknown third party or parties.   I do it all the time, but only for data that I have no concerns about when it comes to privacy or security.   It's not that I don't think that there are not good security measures in place in most data centers, either, but they're "big juicy targets" while my little laptop (and its external backup drive) out here in the middle of cyberspace nowhere are far less tempting targets and, in my opinion, are way less subject to have private data stolen as a result.  To my knowledge my personal computers have never been compromised, yet I was part of the Equifax and Anthem breaches, and you can be sure that those companies probably both use "the cloud" and may very well have hardware that makes up a component part of "the cloud" for others as well.

 

Absolutely. I would never put anything up to the cloud that is in any way confidential or finance related, anything personal. And I certainly wouldn't put any pictures up there that I wouldn't be ok with my own grandmother, for example, seeing. I still very much believe in local storage, in multiple places for redundancy. I do have 1TB of OneDrive as part of O365 but I keep very little there. I also have iCloud Drive, Google Drive, Dropbox, and Box accounts but I never use them. More for just playing around with other services and learning about them. I think the cloud is very convenient but too many people treat it like a bank vault, and it's just not that secure, IMO. And yes, too many people think the cloud is literally up in the clouds, or at least thinking it's some mystical place where human hands other than yours cannot reach. No, it's actually sitting in a datacenter somewhere managed by real people. Sure, sometimes it's encrypted, but still. There are people that can access that data, a lot of times. Maybe not so with an external drive or thumb drive.

 

It's actually funny, Mark writes a bunch of sci-fi tech related books about possible threats in cybersecurity and now he's the CTO of Azure, MSFT's cloud platform, haha. He's mostly known as the Sysinternals guy. That quote comes from his book "Rogue Code". He actually described in one of his books an attack that ended up mostly coming true in the form of Stuxnet, before Stuxnet was discovered. Some of it is more far fetched but some pretty realistic.


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"They might call it the cloud but it is, in fact, just someone else’s computer.”  - Mark Russinovich





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