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Win 7 Black Screen with Cursor on Boot


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#1 Tawidl

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Posted 27 July 2018 - 04:19 PM

Hi All

 

I've read heaps of suggestions from this forum and elsewhere for this issue but none have helped.

 

I made a bit of a mistake* and hit the reset key on the computer shortly after Win 7 had booted to the login screen. I wanted to boot from Linux on the other drive. This resulted in blue screens during boot. Windows Drive recovery then attempted to fix it and apprears to have only been partially successful. Windows now gets as far as a black screen and a cursor when starting normally and in safe mode.

 

So the general suggestions of smashing shift to get the sticky keys dialog didn't work, nor did Ctrl-Alt-Del for the task manager. I then attempted swf /SCANNOW and it said said there was a pending repair but iv no idea what it is or how to activate it.

 

I have a Win 7 repair disk but for some reason the computer won't boot from it so i'm not sure what it actually is. I also have a Win 7 install disk which i'm thinking will be needed when I give up and try in re-install but for whatever reason when the computer boots from that, input from mouse and keyboard ceases and I can't get past the language select to see if theres any repair utilities on there.

 

I'm completely at a loss as to what to do next. Does anyone have any suggestions?

 

 

A further complication is that I have two hard disks setup in Software as RAID 1. In hindsight, another mistake. Thus, these are inaccessible without Windows and i'm curious to know if I get over the 'mouse and keyboard not working when booting from CD' issue, whether I'll still be able to access them and their existing data when If I do a fresh install.

 

Ideal outcome would be recovering the existing install but I won't be holding my breath over that.

Any help/suggestions on the matter are very much appreciated.

 

Thanks.

 

 

 

 

 

 

*Understatement


Edited by Tawidl, 27 July 2018 - 04:21 PM.


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#2 Chris Cosgrove

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Posted 27 July 2018 - 04:35 PM

You make no mention of it but can you boot into Linux and possibly recover your data through that ?

 

Chris Cosgrove



#3 Tawidl

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Posted 27 July 2018 - 07:12 PM

Not on the RAID but iv gotten everything important off of the drive with the install of Windows on it through Linux Mint. It can see the two RAID the drives in the drive manager but it can't access them.



#4 joseibarra

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Posted 28 July 2018 - 04:06 AM

You say "This resulted in blue screens during boot" but do not provide any detail about what the BSOD says.

 

To see what is on the BSOD from the F8 Advanced Boot Options men you can choose:

 

Disable automatic restart on system failure

 

Then on the BSOD provide some details like

 

Attached File  BSODexample.jpg   142.74KB   0 downloads

 

Sometimes your activity can result in hopefully minor corruption of the NT File System (NTFS) and this can usually be fixed by running a chkdsk wit error correction (chkdsk  /r) but you are going to have to boot on something in order to do that - and I'm pretty sure Linux will not allow chkdsk on an NTFS volume that (could be wrong on that).

 

If you can't do that from any of the media you could always make a Hiren's Boot CD which usually works fine for running chkdsk /r but may not in your RAID setup.

 

What is "Windows Drive recovery" and how did you apply that?

What does "smashing shift to get the sticky keys dialog didn't work" mean?  What didn't work?
 

If the system will not boot how did you "attempted swf /SCANNOW"?

 

If you can boot on your Windows 7 CD/DVD and the keyboard/mouse don't work and if those devices are not wireless that sometimes means you need to make an adjustment in the BIOS to use legacy options or attach a different (non USB) keyboard/mouse.  If the KB/mouse are USB you may need to attached a PS/2 device.

 

I don't have any good suggestions at the moment but if you provide more details you might get some good suggestions.


The mediocre teacher tells. The good teacher explains. The superior teacher demonstrates.


#5 Tawidl

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Posted 28 July 2018 - 06:55 AM

Thanks for the response. So in the order that you asked:

 

Regrettably, I only found out I should have captured the BSOD via the method you've mentioned after the startup repair 'sort of' fixed it, stopping the BSOD and bringing me to where I am now. Apologies for getting the name of the startup repair wrong, thats what I should have said rather than Windows Drive Recovery.

 

So I was able to run /SCANNOW by pressing F8 before windows booted and selecting the 'System Recovery Options' option. This lets me run Startup Repair again (but it doesn't achieve anything) and it also enables me to get into the command prompt.

 

So this is a bit of a mixed bag. /SCANNOW references the repair but I'm not sure its actually the correct command. The resource that I read that suggested that the command should be sfc /SCANNOW /OFFBOOTDIR=C:\ /OFFWINDIR=C:\Windows - Regrettably, the response to that one I get is 'Windows Resource Protection could not start the repair service'.

 

So based of your response, I've tried running CHKDSK C:

 

I specified C because I think it's currently on the recovery partition (X), at least thats what this command line says. So the drive itself is a 512GB SSD. Chkdsk however seems to think that whatever drive C is, it is only 102396kb. In comparison, It identifies the correct size of another internal drive (Not the RAID disks) fine.

 

Is it possible that the SSD's drive letter has changed?

 

My next step is to get a-hold of Hirens Boot CD that you have mentioned and see what that can do.

 

 

 

 

In regards to what I was saying about stick keys, the top answer in most locations that I have looked referenced a trick that can be done with activating sticky keys on the black screen with the cursor. Repeatedly hitting shift to bring up it's dialogue box, they are then able to access the ease of access center and from there, the control panels and recovery options.

 

 

Anyway many thanks for the input so far, I appreciate i'm a little inexperienced at providing correct and complete information so I value your questions.


Edited by Tawidl, 28 July 2018 - 06:57 AM.


#6 Chris Cosgrove

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Posted 28 July 2018 - 03:50 PM

If you can get to the Windows command prompt - by any means, fair or foul - then choose 'Run as administrator. If you are in 'Safe mode' I think it is automatically in 'Administrator mode'. Then the commands you are wanting to use are

 

(1)   SFC /SCANNOW  followed by 'Enter' (Case not important, it will appear as caps on the screen but note the space between 'SFC' and /SCANNOW')

 

(2)   CHKDSK /R  followed by 'Enter' (This will come up with a message saying, loosely, Cannot run now, run at next boot? Y/N ?  Press 'Y' then re-boot and it will run)

 

SFC attempts to fix Windows file corruption errors, Chkdsk attempts to fix hard drive problems.

 

Chris Cosgrove



#7 AeonWuLF

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Posted 28 July 2018 - 04:30 PM

I got the same error last night,i did a mistake on msconfig and selected only diagnostic startup.And it doesn't load graphich card drivers also other hardware stuff etc. so you can't see anything. today i fixed it with a simple step. I did a start up repair then it's fixed in a few mins. to reach the error recovery menu, i did ctrl+alt+del when i see the windows logo at start. then the menu appears after reset. You can choose "launc startup repair

(recommended)"

 

hope this will help you too

 

Windows-7-launch-recovery.png


Edited by AeonWuLF, 28 July 2018 - 04:32 PM.


#8 Tawidl

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Posted 29 July 2018 - 05:16 AM

okay, so turns out the drive had hopped to E:

 

So i've managed to boot of a new Win 7 install CD and get to the system repair options which has the command line.

 

CHKDSK /R found no bad files and didn't fix anything, and /SCANNOW continued to refuse to run on the faulty disk with it's "Windows Resource Protection could not start the repair service" roadblock.

 

Anyone know how I could progress from here? A couple of resources have suggested going into 'services' and enabling ;Windows Module Installer' but that seems to require Windows to be operational in order to do so.

 

Thanks



#9 dmccoyks

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Posted 08 August 2018 - 12:48 PM

If you still require help. Are you still able to get into safe mode? Have you considered performing a fresh clean install? If not, are you still experiencing the same error as posted or where are you now?






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