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Windows 7 Frozen Black Screen With White Blinking Cursor


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#1 Marnel

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Posted 26 July 2018 - 06:15 PM

My computer was fine but a sudden black out occurred and now all I got is this:
RqVQxkA.png

 

I already tried pressing ESC and F8 and set the boot menu to my hard drive but nothing happens. My motherboard is ASUS.



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#2 Marnel

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Posted 27 July 2018 - 04:40 PM

Up



#3 JSntgRvr

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Posted 27 July 2018 - 05:15 PM

Hi and welcome.

Please download Farbar Recovery Scan Tool and save it to a flash drive.

Note: You need to run the version compatible with your system. If you are not sure which version applies to your system download both of them and try to run them. Only one of them will run on your system, that will be the right version.

Boot in the Recovery Environment

  • Plug your USB Flash Drive in the infected computer
  • To enter the Recovery Environment with Windows Vista and Windows 7, follow the instructions below:
    • Restart the computer
    • Once you've seen your BIOS splashscreen (the computer manufacturer logo), tap the F8 key repeatedly until the Advanced Boot Options menu appears
    • Use the arrow keys to select Repair your computer, and press on Enter
    • Select your keyboard layout (US, French, etc.) and click on Next
    • Click on Command Prompt to open the command prompt
      Note: If you can't access the Recovery Environment using the F8 method above, you'll need to create a Windows installation or repair media. It can be made on the computer itself or another one running the same version of Windows as the one you plan to use it on. For more information, check out this tutorial on SevenForums.
  • To enter the Recovery Environment with Windows 8 or Windows 8.1, follow the instructions in this tutorial on EightForums
    Note: If you can't access the Recovery Environment using the method above, you'll need to create a Windows installation or repair media. It can be made on the computer itself or another one running the same version of Windows as the one you plan to use it on. For more information, check out this tutorial.
  • To enter the Recovery Environment with Windows 10, follow the instructions in this tutorial on TenForums
    Note: If you can't access the Recovery Environment using the method above, you'll need to create a Windows installation or repair media. It can be made on the computer itself or another one running the same version of Windows as the one you plan to use it on. For more information, check out this tutorial on TenForums.

Once in the command prompt


  • In the command prompt, type notepad and press on Enter
  • Notepad will open. Click on the File menu and select Open
  • Click on Computer/This PC, find the letter for your USB Flash Drive, then close the window and Notepad
  • In the command prompt, type e:\frst.exe (for the x64 version, type e:\frst64.exe and press on Enter
  • Note: Replace the letter e with the drive letter of your USB Flash Drive
  • FRST will open
  • Click on Yes to accept the disclaimer
  • Click on the Scan button and wait for it to complete
  • A log called frst.txt will be saved on your USB Flash Drive. Post it in your next reply

 

 


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#4 Marnel

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Posted 28 July 2018 - 04:43 AM

Hi, thank you but somehow I've fixed it myself. It's working fine again. I just re-installed windows and it worked.



#5 JSntgRvr

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Posted 31 July 2018 - 12:30 PM

Thanks for the feedback.

 

Here is some advise:

 

 
Windows Updates
 
Keeping Windows up to date is one of the first steps in having a safe and secure system.

Keeping your programs up-to-date
 
As for safe browsing habits, you can find tons of guides, tutorials, articles, etc. online that will highlight the basics you need to follow (only visit websites you trust, do not click on ads, do not download files from untrusted sources, use a password manager, always verify the URL of a website and make sure it's correctly typed, etc.), and even what you can do if you want to take it a step further (create a fake email address for spam emails, browse the web in a privacy mode, etc.). Here are a few:


As you can see, there are plenty of resources out there. Simply Googling "good browsing habits" or "safe browsing habits" should allow you to find a lot of them.
 
Other recommendations
 
It's your job to be careful when browsing the web and downloading files if you don't want to get infected. Therefore, if you use your brain (common sense) when browsing the web, downloading programs and files, etc., you have far less chances to get infected by a malware. If for example you're not sure if a website is legitimate or not, or if a file is safe to download and execute, or if a program looks "too good" to be free, I suggest you to avoid going to that website, downloading that file or using that program.
Here are a few guides, tutorials, articles, etc. that you could read in order to learn more about computer protection and security to improve your current computer protection setup but also improve your good web browsing and computer usage practices :

Best regards. :)

 

 

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