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Removed CMOS battery to rectify a monitor issue, now having boot issues.


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9 replies to this topic

#1 MovieMaker5087

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Posted 25 July 2018 - 01:27 AM

A computer that was given to me a few years ago lie dormant until I decided to power it up today. Its a Windows 7 custom built desktop. Well when I booted it up, there was no signal being sent from the computer to the monitor, so I opened up the case and popped out the CMOS battery from the motherboard and let it sit for a half hour before putting it back in. Turn the computer on, and a signal is sent to the monitor and I can finally see things.

However, I then start having boot issues.

First, I was getting a PXE-E61 Media Test Failure Error which I was quick to figure out why - its a boot environment that allows the Intel Desktop Board to boot up using a network interface, instead of booting from an installed hard drive. Well this desktop has been removed from the WiFi network it would have been used to logging onto, so I decide to enter Setup (its a HP setup screen) and when I go to Boot, I change the boot devices around to make sure the HDD Group is first... but it says its not installed. The CD-ROM and Network Group Boot Priorities are though. And its the same thing - either the CD-ROM boot asks for you to insert the boot disc (which I dont have) or if you let it go to the Network Group Boot, then I get the PXE-E61 Media Test Failure Error.

The setup defaults for this computers boot disc priorities are CD-ROM Group first, then HDD Group, Floppy Group, and finally Network Group Boot. Making the HDD Group the first boot device isnt solving this issue.

And when I go to the BIOS screen, only the CD-ROM and Network Groups are the only two options.

UPDATE:
So I went ahead and hit F9 to run diagnostics and the hard drive wasn’t connected/detected. Okay. So I open the rig again, make sure the connections are there, making note to not unplug anything else when I do. Close up rig, fire it up... and it says the fans aren’t working. But they were. And now the thing is just a black screen when I power it up.

So, in short, something is up with the HDD that I feel happpened after the BIOS was reset after the removal of the CMOS battery, and I dont know how to fix this issue or be privy to anymore tech specs about this custom built rig. Any and all help is appreciated. Thank you.

Edited by MovieMaker5087, 25 July 2018 - 01:41 AM.


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#2 OldPhil

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Posted 25 July 2018 - 08:02 AM

Did you put a new battery in?  The battery is important, it may or may not help with the boot issue but will keep the system in time.


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#3 Allan

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Posted 25 July 2018 - 08:32 AM

First, no signal to the monitor would not have anything to do with the cmos battery.

 

Second, optical drive first and hdd second in boot order is fine.

 

Third, I agree it sounds as though you have a hdd issue, but it certainly wasn't caused when you replaced the battery. I suggest you download and run a diagnostic on your hdd - or even better, replace it with a new one (if you have one you can try) and see what happens.

 

I typically don't get involved in "custom built" systems because there are too many unknown variables, but I thought I'd just jump in and offer my two cents :wink:



#4 hamluis

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Posted 25 July 2018 - 09:23 AM

In my llimited experience with my own personal systems...a weakening/failing CMOS battery can cause all sorts of false signals/errors regarding hardware, to include anything from RAM to motherboard hardware functions.. 

 

Your boot options don't hold...hard drive is not recognized...the PXE error is known to be connected to failing CMOS battery.

 

I would spend the less-than-$5 to replace the CMOS battery before I contemplated any other hardware changes/purchases.  After replacing the current one with a new one...I would then boot into the BIOS, reset date/time and boot settings...save and see if there is a difference in system behavior.

 

It's possible that the hard drive has problems, but it's also possible that any signals indicating hardware component situations...are false.

 

Louis


Edited by hamluis, 25 July 2018 - 09:23 AM.


#5 Allan

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Posted 25 July 2018 - 10:28 AM

hamluis - I agree the battery causes the PXE error and I thought he said he replaced it. Rereading the first post, it appears he may have only replaced the old one. Thanks for catching that.

 

MovieMaker - if you did NOT replace the battery with a new one, that's the first thing you have to do.


Edited by Allan, 25 July 2018 - 10:28 AM.


#6 joseibarra

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Posted 25 July 2018 - 11:23 AM

The battery does not cause a PXE error.

 

The PXE error is because either the boot order is set incorrectly and/or the system attempted to boot on the CD/DVD (failed), the HDD/SSD (failed), perhaps USB (failed) and the network boot is usually the last thing in the list.


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#7 Allan

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Posted 25 July 2018 - 12:10 PM

A failed cmos battery will often reset the bios boot order and put the network device first, causing the PXE error.



#8 ToasterHunter

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Posted 25 July 2018 - 01:03 PM

You should always go into BIOS and record settings before resetting or removing the CMOS battery, you'll need to go play with the settings to fix the issues.



#9 OldPhil

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Posted 27 July 2018 - 03:31 PM

Removing the battery for a few minutes will only clear the CMOS and set the BIOS back to default, the only time you need to record settings is if you have reset them from their default settings.  Most all users have no need to reset anything other than boot order when needed.


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#10 hamluis

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Posted 27 July 2018 - 05:25 PM

For new CMOS battery...check/adjust date...time...check to see if all drives connected are properly reflected...check/adjust boot settings...save.

 

Louis






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