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In 2018 For Home Use, Cat5e Or Cat6?


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#1 Phabeon

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Posted 17 July 2018 - 07:55 PM

Seems like a no brainer to use cat6 these days right? 

 

 

Also if I want to run a POE AP or even a non POE AP on the 2nd floor of my 2 story colonial, I just need one cable run of cat6 from modem/router upstairs right?  Will be running 2 100ft cat6's from downstairs upstairs.. one for the future AP and the 2nd for a work required softphone that can ONLY run off direct lan connection from modem/router. 

 

 

Worse comes to worse in the future I can always use a switch upstairs if my needs grow right? 

 

 

please advise,

 

oNe



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#2 Replicator

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Posted 18 July 2018 - 09:37 AM

Wifi has great security features these days if you know what your doing......it beats a run of cables anytime, be they 5 or 6.

 

With ethernet, the larger the run, the greater the bottleneck on your speeds!


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#3 Kilroy

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Posted 18 July 2018 - 09:41 AM

CAT6 unless there is a significant savings running CAT5 and money is tight.

 

If you think you need two, you might want to run three or four.  Always better to have more than you need, rather than less.  When it comes to running extra lines you're just paying for materials, not labor.  Running three would allow for both the IP phone and AP to be on their own run and still leave you with another run that could be used for a switch or third device, work computer?

 

I used a wired connection for most of my devices and only go wireless when there isn't another option.



#4 Phabeon

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Posted 25 July 2018 - 08:28 PM

thanks all

 

I ran cat6(as cheap and easier to find and get as cat5e)

 

ran 3 100ft runs frm basement to attic even tho I only needed one..

 

Then ran another run from living room(1st floor) to basement, 10ft or less.  

 

So I'll be ready whenever I build my homelab downstairs and move my modem from main floor to basement. 

 

NOTE:  My current WiFi router, the mighty NIghthawk (r7000) covers the entire 2 story colonial fantastically with no issues. Thats easily 1700sq ft and includes FRONT yard, back yard, and garage. 
 

INTERESTING the DIFFERING opinions.. i.e., Replicator(wireless) v/s Kilroy(wired)

 

 

The reason I needed the cable run was two-fold..

 

#1 I've always wanted to run a dedicated AP up there, more for the learning experience of it all rather than actual need..  see r7000 note above

 

#2 due to a work requirement, stupid VOIP phone wont run without an ethernet/LAN connection...

 

However since I ran the line for that IMMEDIATE NEEd, aka #2, I figured might as well run 2 more for the future right? so NOW i have 3. 

 

 

oNe



#5 Replicator

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Posted 25 July 2018 - 09:44 PM

A couple of advantages to WiFi would be, rather than move the AP, you could simply put a repeater(wifi amp) in the basement should signal from the above floors become an issue.

Moving the AP simply to reduce your run of cat6 wouldn't be necessary, thus keeping your great coverage!

I run a dedicated router for VPN over WiFi no problem!

 

I agree with you that VOIP over wifi is currently only 'half duplex' which presents an issue of a direct conflict with Voice conversations which tend to be bi-directional.

Ethernet is 'full duplex' which relieves this problem somewhat, however issues can still exist.

 

VOIP over wifi can be resource hogging on the network, however this issue can be resolved today by using an AP that supports the 5ghz band allowing you to move 'high bandwidth' devices to this spectrum. Not only is the 5GHz band less cluttered, it also has many more channels to use for overlapping coverage, this ofcourse, differs from country to country but here in Australia we have 21 non-overlapping 20MHz channels (or 10 for channel-bonded 802.11n).

This allows us to reserve a dedicated channel just for VOIP which can also be done on the 2.4ghz band to improve performance by giving voip more bandwidth.

In my opinion, 5ghz would be the way to go as this would give you supreme data throughput and allow multiple AP's without restriction.

 

Its something to consider anyway!

 

https://www.ebay.com/itm/SNOM-SNO-870-BK-Wifi-Touch-Screen-SIP-VoIP-IP-Phone-PoE-Black-w-PS-/111994649610

 

Another disadvantage is that most voip wifi handsets only support very basic wifi encryption (namely WEP) so it is important to either use a unit that supports WPA2, or isolate your "Voice" network from everything else using appropriate security policies on your APs, and routers/firewalls etc which is not hard to do!

Naturally, protecting your 'voice' traffic over Ethernet is not necessary.

 

Good luck :thumbup2:


Edited by Replicator, 25 July 2018 - 09:59 PM.

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#6 Phabeon

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Posted 13 August 2018 - 05:55 PM

A couple of advantages to WiFi would be, rather than move the AP, you could simply put a repeater(wifi amp) in the basement should signal from the above floors become an issue.

Moving the AP simply to reduce your run of cat6 wouldn't be necessary, thus keeping your great coverage!

I run a dedicated router for VPN over WiFi no problem!

 

I agree with you that VOIP over wifi is currently only 'half duplex' which presents an issue of a direct conflict with Voice conversations which tend to be bi-directional.

Ethernet is 'full duplex' which relieves this problem somewhat, however issues can still exist.

 

VOIP over wifi can be resource hogging on the network, however this issue can be resolved today by using an AP that supports the 5ghz band allowing you to move 'high bandwidth' devices to this spectrum. Not only is the 5GHz band less cluttered, it also has many more channels to use for overlapping coverage, this ofcourse, differs from country to country but here in Australia we have 21 non-overlapping 20MHz channels (or 10 for channel-bonded 802.11n).

This allows us to reserve a dedicated channel just for VOIP which can also be done on the 2.4ghz band to improve performance by giving voip more bandwidth.

In my opinion, 5ghz would be the way to go as this would give you supreme data throughput and allow multiple AP's without restriction.

 

Its something to consider anyway!

 

https://www.ebay.com/itm/SNOM-SNO-870-BK-Wifi-Touch-Screen-SIP-VoIP-IP-Phone-PoE-Black-w-PS-/111994649610

 

Another disadvantage is that most voip wifi handsets only support very basic wifi encryption (namely WEP) so it is important to either use a unit that supports WPA2, or isolate your "Voice" network from everything else using appropriate security policies on your APs, and routers/firewalls etc which is not hard to do!

Naturally, protecting your 'voice' traffic over Ethernet is not necessary.

 

Good luck :thumbup2:

 

good info friend, way more than I bargained for.. 

 

haha but you have me set off on a good path!!

 

outta curiousity..

 

what kind of home network setup do you have at home? 

 

what do you do for a living? 

 

 

oNe






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