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Equifax Security Breach


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#1 sikntired

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Posted 16 July 2018 - 09:42 AM

When the news broke about the Equifax breach and its impact on a potential 140+ million people, I immediately contacted the three Credit Reporting Agencies to freeze my accounts. Like I'm sure many of you did.

 

Now that the furor has somewhat subsided, do you feel it would be safe to unfreeze these accounts? I realize that it is a hassle to freeze then unfreeze accounts but in this day and age it may prove to be wise.

 

What do you think??



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#2 britechguy

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Posted 16 July 2018 - 10:21 AM

I'm not unfreezing mine.   Unless I have the need to have my credit line checked there is absolutely no reason for them to be open to anyone other than those entities that I am already doing business with.

 

I've had one small inconvenience, trying to open a T-Mobile account, because they ran a check against Transunion even though I was signing up for automatic payment.  All I had to do was lift the freeze (which can be done from one's mobile device if you have one and know your login/password), let them run the check, and restore it immediately thereafter.

 

In fact, I'd prefer that my accounts remain frozen.  I want no one to be able to check those records that I do not know about and authorize.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

     . . . the presumption of innocence, while essential in the legal realm, does not mean the elimination of common sense outside it.  The willing suspension of disbelief has its limits, or should.

    ~ Ruth Marcus,  November 10, 2017, in Washington Post article, Bannon is right: It’s no coincidence The Post broke the Moore story


 

 

 

              

 


#3 Replicator

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Posted 16 July 2018 - 10:38 AM

With a possible 143 million breaches, you have more chance of winning the lotto than having your personal information compromised!

 

You are not big fish.


Edited by Replicator, 16 July 2018 - 10:43 AM.

The quieter you become, the more you are able to hear!
CEH, CISSP @ WhiteHat Computers Pty Ltd

 


#4 sikntired

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Posted 16 July 2018 - 11:01 AM

With a possible 143 million breaches, you have more chance of winning the lotto than having your personal information compromised!

 

You are not big fish.

Granted, I am not a big fish. And your response suggests that  you are not concerned. Hmmm, interesting unless that supposed winner happens to be you.


Edited by sikntired, 16 July 2018 - 11:04 AM.


#5 britechguy

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Posted 16 July 2018 - 11:17 AM

Nor am I a big fish, but some subset of "the school" is likely to be compromised unless those who stole this data did so "just for the glory of it" (which is possible, there's a lot of one-upsmanship in the hacking community).

 

Nevertheless, I had (and have) no intention of leaving myself open to being one of the unlucky ones when the mechanisms exist for me to easily and painlessly ensure (or as close to it as I can get) that I will not be exist and I have access to them.


Edited by britechguy, 16 July 2018 - 11:19 AM.

Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

     . . . the presumption of innocence, while essential in the legal realm, does not mean the elimination of common sense outside it.  The willing suspension of disbelief has its limits, or should.

    ~ Ruth Marcus,  November 10, 2017, in Washington Post article, Bannon is right: It’s no coincidence The Post broke the Moore story


 

 

 

              

 


#6 Replicator

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Posted 16 July 2018 - 12:08 PM

 

With a possible 143 million breaches, you have more chance of winning the lotto than having your personal information compromised!

 

You are not big fish.

Granted, I am not a big fish. And your response suggests that  you are not concerned. Hmmm, interesting unless that supposed winner happens to be you.

 

No, Im not concerned at all, and neither should you be, however it makes practical sense to never leave yourself exposed, no matter what!

 

But many thanks, you have ignited my lost hope in winning......Im off to buy a ticket :thumbup2:


Edited by Replicator, 16 July 2018 - 12:21 PM.

The quieter you become, the more you are able to hear!
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#7 JohnC_21

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Posted 16 July 2018 - 12:59 PM

I'm not unfreezing mine.   Unless I have the need to have my credit line checked there is absolutely no reason for them to be open to anyone other than those entities that I am already doing business with.

 

I've had one small inconvenience, trying to open a T-Mobile account, because they ran a check against Transunion even though I was signing up for automatic payment.  All I had to do was lift the freeze (which can be done from one's mobile device if you have one and know your login/password), let them run the check, and restore it immediately thereafter.

 

In fact, I'd prefer that my accounts remain frozen.  I want no one to be able to check those records that I do not know about and authorize.

+1 on this. I also went further and did a credit freeze with the next smallest credit agency called Innovis.

 

http://www.post-gazette.com/business/money/2017/10/02/Innovis-Equifax-data-breach-security-freezes/stories/201709260134



#8 britechguy

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Posted 16 July 2018 - 01:49 PM

John,

 

            I did Equifax, Transunion, Experian, and Innovis.   I was part of the Anthem breach several years before the Equifax breach.

 

            Even though I strongly espouse the general principle, "Worry about the probable, not the remotely possible," I did not even want to chance getting "up close and personal" with identity theft or credit destruction.  I also took up Anthem and Equifax both on identity theft monitoring services for several years each.

 

            I sleep better simply because I've made the remotely possible virtually impossible now.  An ounce of prevention, and all that.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

     . . . the presumption of innocence, while essential in the legal realm, does not mean the elimination of common sense outside it.  The willing suspension of disbelief has its limits, or should.

    ~ Ruth Marcus,  November 10, 2017, in Washington Post article, Bannon is right: It’s no coincidence The Post broke the Moore story


 

 

 

              

 


#9 sikntired

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Posted 16 July 2018 - 05:10 PM

Thanks to all who have espoused their respective opinions. I do think that in the event I need to unfreeze my credit for whatever reason I shall in turn place a freeze back on at the conclusion for that reason.

 

I too believe in the adage "An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure".



#10 JohnC_21

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Posted 16 July 2018 - 05:27 PM

There was a law recently passed that will eliminate the fee for freezing and thawing your credit. It goes into effect  in September.

 

https://www.creditkarma.com/insights/i/new-law-free-credit-freezes/



#11 britechguy

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Posted 16 July 2018 - 05:57 PM

There was a law recently passed that will eliminate the fee for freezing and thawing your credit. It goes into effect  in September.

 

https://www.creditkarma.com/insights/i/new-law-free-credit-freezes/

 

And for several of the "big guys," I know Transunion and Equifax for certain, if you set up the ability to log in to their sites to manage your credit record you can already freeze and thaw without charge.  It's been a couple of weeks, so I am not 100% certain of this, but Transunion will also allow you to thaw your credit record, either for a set period or ongoing, for inquiries by specific entities.  I can't imagine why one would do that "ongoing" for specific entities, as anyone with whom you do business that provides you credit can always make inquiries against and additions to your credit record.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

     . . . the presumption of innocence, while essential in the legal realm, does not mean the elimination of common sense outside it.  The willing suspension of disbelief has its limits, or should.

    ~ Ruth Marcus,  November 10, 2017, in Washington Post article, Bannon is right: It’s no coincidence The Post broke the Moore story


 

 

 

              

 


#12 sikntired

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Posted 17 July 2018 - 07:12 AM

 

There was a law recently passed that will eliminate the fee for freezing and thawing your credit. It goes into effect  in September.

 

https://www.creditkarma.com/insights/i/new-law-free-credit-freezes/

 

And for several of the "big guys," I know Transunion and Equifax for certain, if you set up the ability to log in to their sites to manage your credit record you can already freeze and thaw without charge.  It's been a couple of weeks, so I am not 100% certain of this, but Transunion will also allow you to thaw your credit record, either for a set period or ongoing, for inquiries by specific entities.  I can't imagine why one would do that "ongoing" for specific entities, as anyone with whom you do business that provides you credit can always make inquiries against and additions to your credit record.

 

 

I was aware that you could unfreeze one's credit record temporarily but I was not sure about allowing a particular entity for that period of time. For instance, suppose my credit record is frozen and along comes XYZ company that is offering a really good deal. Could I contact the respective credit card reporting companies and tell them to allow XYZ company access for a specific period of time?



#13 britechguy

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Posted 17 July 2018 - 09:19 AM

I could have sworn that I found that feature at either the Equifax or Transunion "user control" websites, trustedidpremier.com and trueidentity.com, respectively.

 

I can't find it this morning on the Transunion site and don't feel like trying to do an unfreeze and freeze on either to see if the option pops up.

 

In the end, I really do not care all that much who might make an inquiry against the account if I open it for a brief period for an intended query.  The probability of some nefarious actor "just happening" to try to set up new credit in my name during the brief window I've lifted a freeze for a legitimate query is infinitesimally small.  Most checks can be made "while you wait," so if you use a mobile device to unlock and relock your report it can be completely done in under 30 minutes.

 

If one were doing this by phone it's doubtful that you could have any real precision, timing wise, anyway.  I have never handled any of this stuff via phone except for the initial parts where that was essentially a requirement as part of the process.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

     . . . the presumption of innocence, while essential in the legal realm, does not mean the elimination of common sense outside it.  The willing suspension of disbelief has its limits, or should.

    ~ Ruth Marcus,  November 10, 2017, in Washington Post article, Bannon is right: It’s no coincidence The Post broke the Moore story


 

 

 

              

 


#14 sikntired

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Posted 17 July 2018 - 11:09 AM

Thanks again for everyone's input. As for unfreezing and freezing for XYZ company, I guess one would have to see if that option was available in going through the steps in unfreezing a credit record.



#15 JohnC_21

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Posted 17 July 2018 - 11:17 AM

There is a difference between a lock and a freeze. A lock can be unlocked immediately over the web but a freeze requires a thaw which takes some time as a PIN is required. Some people say a thaw only takes moments so it may depend on the agency. Now that a freeze and thaw will be free of fees in September there may not be an advantage to the lock.

 

https://www.nasdaq.com/g00/article/credit-lock-vs-credit-freeze-how-these-security-options-stack-up-cm856592?i10c.encReferrer=aHR0cHM6Ly93d3cuZ29vZ2xlLmNvbS8%3D&i10c.ua=1&i10c.dv=14


Edited by JohnC_21, 17 July 2018 - 11:20 AM.





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