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Getting "Read Error" While Booting


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#1 MinterTheMaladroit

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Posted 16 July 2018 - 03:56 AM

Hi,

Currently, my notebook does not have a SATA Drive installed (the drive is faulty). I'd like to try Linux Mint (19) out, so I created a Live USB and installed the OS on a USB stick. However, I prefer the OS installed on a Hard Drive since their capacity is higher than USB sticks. I tried both partitioning the Hard Drive by myself (through GParted and the installaiton software) and letting the software do it, but I encountered a black screen with a text "Read Error" in both of the cases whilst booting (does not boot to grub). I already ran a boot-repair, so if it helps, you can check the result.

 

Any help is appreciated,

Thank you.

 

(By the way, I am aware of the topics addressing the same issue. However, since there are many factors to consider, every situation is unique on its own. That is why I opened a new thread.)

Attached Files


Edited by MinterTheMaladroit, 16 July 2018 - 04:02 AM.


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#2 Mike_Walsh

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Posted 16 July 2018 - 07:05 AM

Hi, MinterTheMaladroit. And :welcome: to the Linux & Unix forum here at BC.

 

Hm. Well, currently, your partition is showing as completely full. I've never, ever seen that before with a Linux install, so.....something's not quite right there somewhere.

 

Whether it's anything to do with your using LVM, I wouldn't know. It's not something I've ever bothered with; by all accounts, it's more trouble than it's worth (despite being a good idea).

 

Some of the others will be along soon. I don't use Mint, y'see ('Puppy' Linux fanatic); most of the regulars here, however, do use Mint (they seem to like it!!)

 

 

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#3 paul88ks

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Posted 16 July 2018 - 01:21 PM

Hello Minter- I am a little confused. If you say that your hard drive is faulty,then why are you trying to install on it?

 

Also, if  your USB stick is giving you a read error,there may be a problem with the USB stick itself. It's also possible that you got a corrupt .iso image that you installed on the USB stick.

 

Could you elaborate on this please?



#4 MinterTheMaladroit

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Posted 16 July 2018 - 02:15 PM

Hello Minter- I am a little confused. If you say that your hard drive is faulty,then why are you trying to install on it?
 
Also, if  your USB stick is giving you a read error,there may be a problem with the USB stick itself. It's also possible that you got a corrupt .iso image that you installed on the USB stick.
 
Could you elaborate on this please?


The USB stick succesfully boots to Linux Mint and I am installing the OS on another Hard Drive.

(The USB Stick has Linux 18.3 installed,
The Live USB stick has Linux 19 installation files,
The Hard Drive has Linux 19 installed)

#5 paul88ks

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Posted 16 July 2018 - 05:30 PM

I noticed one thing on your Gparted thumbnail that you posted. Your file system should be Ex4. Not Lvm2 Pv. I've never heard of that. Are you doing the install manually , or using the automated installer-

 

Also, are you using an external hard drive? The reason being, I don't think you can install to an external HDD unless you have an internal one hooked up. The MBR is usually on the Primary drive- or if it is UEFI the same thing! The boot sector is on the C:drive

 

Your Mount point is also incorrect - it should be ./

 

And your bootloader should be in the same partition as your install- if memory serves me correctly. It HAS been a while since I did a manual install,but I've done many,many multi-boot systems.

 

Anyway,I'm more than happy to walk you through it! Paul


Edited by paul88ks, 16 July 2018 - 05:50 PM.


#6 N_K

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Posted 16 July 2018 - 05:48 PM

LVM 2 PV means Logical Volume Manager 2 and PV stands for Physical Volume. 

 

The OP is using LVM to manage his secondary storage space.  If the OP has only one physical HDD/SDD, I would suggest the OP to use traditional partitioning instead. Take note that Windows will not boot from LVM-based partitions/drives. If the OP wants to run Linux and Windows side by side, traditional partitioning should be used instead.

 

LVM can be very confusing for newbies. Unless you need to take snapshots of system images regularly for backups (RAID will also do the job), or say you have more drives and need better control over how the files are shared between the 2 or more drives, go for traditional partitioning instead. 

 

Just my 2 cents.

 

Also: It is not suggested to have /boot partition on LVM2. Try isolating the /boot partition out of LVM.

 

According to the boot-repair log, it did not fix the MBR if the MBR is faulty. Maybe you want to have a look at that.

 

Helpful link: https://askubuntu.com/questions/397485/what-to-do-when-i-get-an-attempt-to-read-or-write-outside-of-disk-hd0-error


Edited by Nicholas_Kang, 16 July 2018 - 06:19 PM.


#7 paul88ks

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Posted 16 July 2018 - 06:18 PM

LVM 2 PV means Logical Volume Manager 2 and PV stands for Physical Volume. 

 

The OP is using LVM to manage his secondary storage space.  If the OP has only one physical HDD/SDD, I would suggest the OP to use traditional partitioning instead. Take note that Windows will not boot from LVM-based partitions/drives. If the OP wants to run Linux and Windows side by side, traditional partitioning should be used instead.

 

LVM can be very confusing for newbies. Unless you need to take snapshots of system images regularly for backups (RAID will also do the job), or say you have more drives and need better control over how the files are shared between the 2 or more drives, go for traditional partitioning instead. 

 

Just my 2 cents.

 

Also: It is not suggested to have /boot partition on LVM2. 

Thank You Nickolas_King LVM 2 PV  is something I've never heard of, and especially in a Linux install. I'm glad you knew what it was!



#8 N_K

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Posted 16 July 2018 - 06:34 PM

You're welcome. Actually, I am still learning about LVM. It's a more advanced way of managing your storage space and give you additional flexibility on moving files, but can be damging to a system as well, if incorrectly used. 

 

Unless one is running mission-critical systems or choose to backup his/her files regularly, I don't see any point tampering with LVM that early. After all, you can move to LVM easily even after you have installed Mint. You can easily create LVs and VGs from the PVs (wow, nice acronyms...) you have later after you have installed Mint using the traditional approach.

 

If you look at the pastebin that the OP posted in the first post, you will see that Grub successfully probed the VGs and found Linux Mint 19 installed on sdb1, which means that nothing seems to be wrong with the MBR. The OS-prober also found the OP's Mint 19 on the HDD. 

 

I am suspecting that the /boot partition in the LVM2 is what causes the read error.


Edited by Nicholas_Kang, 16 July 2018 - 07:13 PM.


#9 pcpunk

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Posted 16 July 2018 - 08:15 PM

Computer Model Number please.

 

Are you trying to boot and install in UEFI Mode with Secure Boot Enabled?

 

Next time I would be better to not choose LVM unless you know what why when and where about it all.

 

I would create Un-allocated Space on the whole drive and start over with some help from the members.

 

Please provide specs linux style.  Copy Paste this command into the Terminal and Post it into a Code Block or into your next post Body.

inxi -Fxz

Edited by pcpunk, 16 July 2018 - 08:23 PM.

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#10 MinterTheMaladroit

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Posted 17 July 2018 - 12:04 AM

I noticed one thing on your Gparted thumbnail that you posted. Your file system should be Ex4. Not Lvm2 Pv. I've never heard of that. Are you doing the install manually , or using the automated installer-

 

Also, are you using an external hard drive? The reason being, I don't think you can install to an external HDD unless you have an internal one hooked up. The MBR is usually on the Primary drive- or if it is UEFI the same thing! The boot sector is on the C:drive

 

Your Mount point is also incorrect - it should be ./

 

And your bootloader should be in the same partition as your install- if memory serves me correctly. It HAS been a while since I did a manual install,but I've done many,many multi-boot systems.

 

Anyway,I'm more than happy to walk you through it! Paul

 

I am using an external Hard Drive, but how did it install the OS with no problem on a USB stick that it does not on an external HD? What is the difference anyway? Also, I don't think that I get what you mean by my mount point is incorrect and my bootlodaer should be in the same partition as the install.

 

 

LVM 2 PV means Logical Volume Manager 2 and PV stands for Physical Volume. 

 

The OP is using LVM to manage his secondary storage space.  If the OP has only one physical HDD/SDD, I would suggest the OP to use traditional partitioning instead. Take note that Windows will not boot from LVM-based partitions/drives. If the OP wants to run Linux and Windows side by side, traditional partitioning should be used instead.

 

LVM can be very confusing for newbies. Unless you need to take snapshots of system images regularly for backups (RAID will also do the job), or say you have more drives and need better control over how the files are shared between the 2 or more drives, go for traditional partitioning instead. 

 

Just my 2 cents.

 

Also: It is not suggested to have /boot partition on LVM2. Try isolating the /boot partition out of LVM.

 

According to the boot-repair log, it did not fix the MBR if the MBR is faulty. Maybe you want to have a look at that.

 

Helpful link: https://askubuntu.com/questions/397485/what-to-do-when-i-get-an-attempt-to-read-or-write-outside-of-disk-hd0-error

 

LVM was just an option that I went for after two unsuccessful boots (the installations were successful though; one auto-partitioned, the other one by myself).

I will, again, install the OS and let Linux take care of everything.

 

By the way, I followed the instructions (by Andrew) in the link. However, it did not boot; instead, a black screen with a winking white horizontal line appeared.

 

 

 

Computer Model Number please.

 

Are you trying to boot and install in UEFI Mode with Secure Boot Enabled?

 

Next time I would be better to not choose LVM unless you know what why when and where about it all.

 

I would create Un-allocated Space on the whole drive and start over with some help from the members.

 

Please provide specs linux style.  Copy Paste this command into the Terminal and Post it into a Code Block or into your next post Body.

inxi -Fxz

 

Well, this notebook is 8 years old (HP Pavilion dv6 1235-et). Hence, it does not have options like Secure Boot in BIOS. inxi -Fxz

 

 

You're welcome. Actually, I am still learning about LVM. It's a more advanced way of managing your storage space and give you additional flexibility on moving files, but can be damging to a system as well, if incorrectly used. 

 

Unless one is running mission-critical systems or choose to backup his/her files regularly, I don't see any point tampering with LVM that early. After all, you can move to LVM easily even after you have installed Mint. You can easily create LVs and VGs from the PVs (wow, nice acronyms...) you have later after you have installed Mint using the traditional approach.

 

If you look at the pastebin that the OP posted in the first post, you will see that Grub successfully probed the VGs and found Linux Mint 19 installed on sdb1, which means that nothing seems to be wrong with the MBR. The OS-prober also found the OP's Mint 19 on the HDD. 

 

I am suspecting that the /boot partition in the LVM2 is what causes the read error.

 

As I said, I am also getting the error even though I use a ext4 partition. Anyway, I am going to try installing it again (formatted to ext4 of course).


Edited by MinterTheMaladroit, 17 July 2018 - 02:51 AM.


#11 N_K

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Posted 17 July 2018 - 05:22 AM

Drives: HDD Total Size: 515.5GB (2.3% used)
           ID-1: USB /dev/sda model: Ultra size: 15.4GB
           ID-2: USB /dev/sdb model: Elements_1042 size: 500.1GB

Partition: ID-1: / size: 11G used: 8.4G (84%) fs: ext4 dev: /dev/dm-0
           ID-2: /boot size: 472M used: 68M (16%) fs: ext2 dev: /dev/sda1
           ID-3: swap-1 size: 3.22GB used: 0.00GB (0%) fs: swap dev: /dev/dm-1

 

This is worth noting. So, / and swap-1 seems to belong to the external USB HDD, but it can be inferred that the size of the HDD is only (11 + 3.22) GB and not ~500.1 GB. 

 

The /boot partition seems to belong to /dev/sda1 which is the 15.4 GB USB stick with Mint 18.3 installed.

 

Just to confirm with you, you now have 2 USB flash drives with an external USB HDD?

 

In the very first log that you posted early in the thread, that 7.6 GB device with an iso9660 file system is the Live USB stick which has Mint 19's installation files?

 

Is that correct?

 

If this is true, it makes me wonder why your 16.4 GB USB stick with Mint 18.3 installed only has a /boot partition and not other file systems such as /, /usr, /tmp etc. How can you Mint 18.3 work without all other files except from those in /boot? Or is it because the / and swap-1 partition (referred to as /dev/dm-0 and /dev/dm-1) belong to the Mint 18.3 system.

 

Do you use LVM on your Mint 18.3 system? 


Edited by Nicholas_Kang, 17 July 2018 - 05:27 AM.


#12 MinterTheMaladroit

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Posted 17 July 2018 - 06:05 AM

 

Drives: HDD Total Size: 515.5GB (2.3% used)
           ID-1: USB /dev/sda model: Ultra size: 15.4GB
           ID-2: USB /dev/sdb model: Elements_1042 size: 500.1GB

Partition: ID-1: / size: 11G used: 8.4G (84%) fs: ext4 dev: /dev/dm-0
           ID-2: /boot size: 472M used: 68M (16%) fs: ext2 dev: /dev/sda1
           ID-3: swap-1 size: 3.22GB used: 0.00GB (0%) fs: swap dev: /dev/dm-1

 

This is worth noting. So, / and swap-1 seems to belong to the external USB HDD, but it can be inferred that the size of the HDD is only (11 + 3.22) GB and not ~500.1 GB. 

 

The /boot partition seems to belong to /dev/sda1 which is the 15.4 GB USB stick with Mint 18.3 installed.

 

Just to confirm with you, you now have 2 USB flash drives with an external USB HDD?

 

In the very first log that you posted early in the thread, that 7.6 GB device with an iso9660 file system is the Live USB stick which has Mint 19's installation files?

 

Is that correct?

 

If this is true, it makes me wonder why your 16.4 GB USB stick with Mint 18.3 installed only has a /boot partition and not other file systems such as /, /usr, /tmp etc. How can you Mint 18.3 work without all other files except from those in /boot? Or is it because the / and swap-1 partition (referred to as /dev/dm-0 and /dev/dm-1) belong to the Mint 18.3 system.

 

Do you use LVM on your Mint 18.3 system? 

 

 

Yes, the 8GB one is the Live USB stick which has Linux Mint 19 installation files. It used to have 18.3, but after installing that 18.3 on the 16 GB USB stick, I formatted it and copied Mint 19's installation files.

Yes, again, I have 2 USB flash drives (18.3 installed and and 19 Live USB) and an external Hard Drive (500 GB).

I have no idea how it can run Linux Mint without the files you mentioned (which I thought the drive had them all) and I do not use LVM on this USB stick.

 

By the way, I have another Hard Drive (the 3rd one this is) which I thought was faulty due to the fact that Linux never managed to complete installation on this drive (after that I could not get it formatted). Just to check it again, and maybe to repair it, I ran the software "TestDisk". It's running for hours and but still only 30% is completed. The reason of me mentioning this Hard Drive is the result of this test (even thought it's not finished yet). It just seemed absurd to me; but, you, more experienced users will surely analyze it better.

(Smart Test Info for the same Hard Drive)

 

Now, I also checked the smart test information for the SATA drive I mentioned in the first message (the faulty one) and it turns out that it passes the test altough it possesses 720914 reallocated sectors. I do not have the slightest idea why this Drive does not work, but I am going to find it out.

 

Update: I just installed Linux again (by letting it take care of everything) and I still get the Read Error.


Edited by MinterTheMaladroit, 17 July 2018 - 01:00 PM.


#13 N_K

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Posted 17 July 2018 - 06:46 AM

I can see that you have lots of bad sectors in your 3rd HDD (2047 sectors for "Relocated Sector Count" attribute). See for yourself the raw values in the SMART data and compare them with the optimum values posted here.

 

I won't be surprised if that HDD is performing badly.

 

As to why you can still run Mint 18.3 with just /boot and not the rest of the file systems on your USB drive, I will leave that to pcpunk and the rest of the Linux experts to answer.

 

I don't use Mint personally. (I'm from the Red Hat family. :P) I do have XenialPup 64 Puppy Linux installed on my 4GB USB drive, though I hardly use it due to security concerns.   

 

But one thing is clear though: since you also failed in the previous endeavors while using the traditional partitioning scheme, this certainly has nothing to do with initramfs not able to support LVM or other LVM-related issues.  

 

A few suggestions are: 

 

1. Perhaps check your external HDD and see if there is any bad sectors/other issues? The fact that / and swap size don't sum up to anywhere near 500.1 GB is deeply troubling (or did I misunderstand anything about LVM?)

 

2. Maybe you want to post screenshots of your installation process here so that others have a clearer picture of what really went wrong with the installations. Perhaps there's something not right with the partitioning scheme? 

 

That said, I am no expert on Linux stuff.

 

pcpunk and others will probably have more to say on this issue.    


Edited by Nicholas_Kang, 17 July 2018 - 07:31 AM.


#14 MinterTheMaladroit

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Posted 17 July 2018 - 01:16 PM

I can see that you have lots of bad sectors in your 3rd HDD (2047 sectors for "Relocated Sector Count" attribute). See for yourself the raw values in the SMART data and compare them with the optimum values posted here.

 

I won't be surprised if that HDD is performing badly.

 

As to why you can still run Mint 18.3 with just /boot and not the rest of the file systems on your USB drive, I will leave that to pcpunk and the rest of the Linux experts to answer.

 

I don't use Mint personally. (I'm from the Red Hat family. :P) I do have XenialPup 64 Puppy Linux installed on my 4GB USB drive, though I hardly use it due to security concerns.   

 

But one thing is clear though: since you also failed in the previous endeavors while using the traditional partitioning scheme, this certainly has nothing to do with initramfs not able to support LVM or other LVM-related issues.  

 

A few suggestions are: 

 

1. Perhaps check your external HDD and see if there is any bad sectors/other issues? The fact that / and swap size don't sum up to anywhere near 500.1 GB is deeply troubling (or did I misunderstand anything about LVM?)

 

2. Maybe you want to post screenshots of your installation process here so that others have a clearer picture of what really went wrong with the installations. Perhaps there's something not right with the partitioning scheme? 

 

That said, I am no expert on Linux stuff.

 

pcpunk and others will probably have more to say on this issue.    

 

I do not think that I do anything wrong whilst the installation, so I will just apply your first suggestion.

I ran the command below to check the health status of the Hard Drive I want to install the OS on. This is the command's output and this one is the TestDisk output.

sudo smartctl -a /dev/sdb

Edited by MinterTheMaladroit, 17 July 2018 - 01:51 PM.


#15 pcpunk

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Posted 17 July 2018 - 02:51 PM

Turn Off your Discrete Graphics Card in BIOS and reinstall to HDD, if possible, but I don't think it is.  That graphics card is not supported anymore.  You would have to install Ubuntu 14.04.1, or .2, but then don't let it go to .3 etc. 

 

EDIT: Or, Mint 17.2

 

Maybe this will work, or wait to see if anyone else here has done this:  TRY THIS

 

http://h10032.www1.hp.com/ctg/Manual/c01758220

 

I don't know what is going on with your partitions.  For me there are to many things going on.  If you want, run: sudo parted -l and paste it back in the Forum.  and: sudo blkid


Edited by pcpunk, 17 July 2018 - 03:04 PM.

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