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When I first got Windows 10 it was at the auto update stage, it was very buggy.


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#1 Dan50

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Posted 15 July 2018 - 08:51 PM

The OS froze up randomly, I put up with it for about a year or so, then downgraded back to 8.1, if I got the latest version would the chances of it freezing be a lot less with all the updates it with through? I want to try it out again on my laptop. 



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#2 JohnC_21

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Posted 15 July 2018 - 08:57 PM

I would ask if you are satisfied with the computer as it is currently running. If yes then stick with 8.1 which has an end of life date of 2023, almost a full 5 years. If you plan on getting a new computer before 2023 stick with 8.1 and avoid any headaches a new semi-annual Windows 10 upgrade would possibly give you. With 8.1 you know any hardware that is working now will continue to work until 2023. Because Windows 10 is classified as a service any hardware has a chance of not being supported. 



#3 britechguy

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Posted 16 July 2018 - 08:47 AM

And I'll be the flip side of the coin.

 

I can see no point in sticking with Windows 8.1 unless one has to.  The latest version of Windows is Windows 10 and putting off trying it again is just postponing the inevitable.  It also brings back quite a few things that quite a few of us missed from Windows 7 (and earlier).

 

There is also the strong possibility that you may be someone who either has to or wants to use a computer other than your own on occasion, and if that computer is newer than yours it will have Windows 10 on it.

 

Even if one encounters the occasional problem with the feature updates (and I have, twice, and have been updating 5 machines with Windows 10 since its debut) they do not prove catastrophic if you are carrying out routine full system image backups which take very little time to restore from.  Windows as a service is not going away, so learning to cope with this new delivery paradigm is part and parcel of being within the ongoing Windows ecosystem.

 

I'd say take a full system image backup of your system, plus a user data backup as a separate one, then first try upgrading (which I think you still should be able to do since a digital entitlement already exists for your machine).  If the upgrade doesn't work, or you still have odd problems, I'd consider Doing a Completely Clean Install of Windows 10 to see if that works better.  Doing upgrade on "well-used" but not necessarily assiduously updated and maintained systems tends to expose the flaws in the foundation upon which the upgrade was built.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

     . . . the presumption of innocence, while essential in the legal realm, does not mean the elimination of common sense outside it.  The willing suspension of disbelief has its limits, or should.

    ~ Ruth Marcus,  November 10, 2017, in Washington Post article, Bannon is right: It’s no coincidence The Post broke the Moore story


 

 

 

              

 


#4 JohnC_21

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Posted 16 July 2018 - 10:21 AM

I agree 100% on the clean install if upgrading to Windows 10 and since you already installed 10 the license is digital and your OS will auto activate.



#5 rp88

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Posted 16 July 2018 - 08:13 PM

If you really want to try something new, have a go at live booting a linux OS, linux mint is pretty suitable for someone with a windows background. You can live boot linux without altering your windows OS at all, if you don't like it you can format the live USB on which linux was installed and use it for data storage again. You might find it preferable to windows 10, which is still buggy according to some and ok according to others (there is a large luck element to Win 10 depending on your exact hardware and low level settings and configurations).

If you want to see what windows 10 is like britechguy has a good suggestion about seeing if someone you know has a win 10 machine, you can have a look and see if you like what it seems like to you. If you do feel after that that an upgrade is for you, and you're willing to take the risk of bugs, then make sure to do a fresh install rather than try to upgrade in place, this will reduce the bug risk quite a bit compared to the chance of bugs when MS was forcing in place upgrades down the unwilling throats of windows 8.1 and 7 users. Always make system image backups ( https://www.bleepingcomputer.com/tutorials/create-system-image-in-windows-7-8/ ) before doing any major fiddling with your OS, they are the best way to get yourself back to a system in a good state with the programs you want all installed and all the settings how you like them.

Edited by rp88, 16 July 2018 - 08:14 PM.

Back on this site, for a while anyway, been so busy the last year.

My systems:2 laptops, intel i3 processors, windows 8.1 installed on the hard-drive and linux mint 17.3 MATE installed to USB

#6 britechguy

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Posted 16 July 2018 - 08:35 PM

. . . then make sure to do a fresh install rather than try to upgrade in place, this will reduce the bug risk quite a bit compared to the chance of bugs when MS was forcing in place upgrades down the unwilling throats of windows 8.1 and 7 users. 

 

I will absolutely be the contrarian with regard to this assertion, which gets made repeatedly.  I have three machines, one in-place upgraded from Windows 7 and two from Windows 8.1, that have never given me a moment's trouble and never had any issues with feature updates, either.

 

If you are someone who doesn't ignore "odd issues" with your computer and made sure to assiduously apply updates as they became available then in-place upgrades were not generally problematic.   Virtually everyone I know or know of who has had problems after an in-place upgrade eventually says something like, "Oh, the system had been unstable under [insert prior version of Windows] for [insert any time period long enough to have noticed ongoing instability].  I hoped the upgrade would fix the system."  An in place upgrade is very much the building of a new house on an existing foundation.  If the foundation's unstable, the new house will be so as well.

 

But, all of the above being said, if you have the luxury of not needing to even try to preserve anything you had (other than by having taken a full system image backup and separate user data backup) then definitely do a completely clean install.  That even helps to eliminate all manufacturer-installed bloatware as part of the process, and that can be a huge blessing in and of itself.  Just make sure you've done an inventory of the software you will be wanting to reinstall under Windows 10 and have the installation media handy.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

     . . . the presumption of innocence, while essential in the legal realm, does not mean the elimination of common sense outside it.  The willing suspension of disbelief has its limits, or should.

    ~ Ruth Marcus,  November 10, 2017, in Washington Post article, Bannon is right: It’s no coincidence The Post broke the Moore story


 

 

 

              

 





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