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chown comand probloms.


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#1 ksharp117

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Posted 06 July 2018 - 02:18 AM

Hello all.

trying to go threw this tutorial https://www.bleepingcomputer.com/forums/t/598615/a-simple-beginners-guide-to-setting-up-a-samba-share/

I'm on the second step trying to change the ownership of the Shares file from root to user, I'm typing chown /home/Shares pi:pi but I keep getting "chown: invalid user: '/home/Shares'

not sure what I'm doing wrong, pretty new to linux. Thanks in advance for any help.



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#2 Al1000

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Posted 06 July 2018 - 04:18 AM

Hi, please post the output of this command:
echo $USER
EDIT: Nevermind, please see below.

Edited by Al1000, 06 July 2018 - 04:36 AM.


#3 rufwoof

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Posted 06 July 2018 - 04:22 AM

​Its more usual for 'nix to have the source of commands first, target last. I would have expected the command to be chown pi:pi /home/Shares


OpenBSD


#4 Al1000

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Posted 06 July 2018 - 04:35 AM

^ Good point. That will be the problem. I've edited the tutorial accordingly.

#5 Mike_Walsh

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Posted 06 July 2018 - 01:58 PM

​Its more usual for 'nix to have the source of commands first, target last. I would have expected the command to be chown pi:pi /home/Shares

 

Same with creating sym-links with

ln -s

....I believe. Original 'source' file first, then 'target'.

 

@ksharp117:-

 

Don't forget the '-R' (the 'recursive' argument) if you want the chown command to apply to any directories/files on the next level down.

chown -R pi:pi xxx/xxx/xxx

Capital 'R', not a small one. That gives a different meaning entirely.

 

The GNU/Linux 'man' page for chown might be useful to read...

 

https://linux.die.net/man/1/chown

 

 

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#6 rufwoof

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Posted 08 July 2018 - 06:22 AM

Just a word of caution. -R recursive setting of permissions has to be used with great care. 'nix file/folder ownerships and permissions typically have been carefully selected/set by developers such that they all pull together along with user/group settings to make a complete whole. Setting even just one files ownership/permissions incorrectly could invalidate the entire standard system security, little different to a potential exploitable bug in a system file that might open up privilege elevation (compromised system). The capitalised R option is a means to reduce the risk of unintended usage of recursion. And generally you should only ever look to perhaps use that when being applied to files/folders under /home (your own files/folders, none of the system files/folders).


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